Independence enterprise. (Independence, Or.) 1908-1969, August 11, 1922, Page PAGE SIX, Image 6

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Page Six INDEPENDENCE ENTERPPTHR Friday. Al.gu.st
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! (f k Mother Meant W AM&Bl tL) rZLlf AX VO
i . L. CROSBY SSJ' y- A0f. 'MyS
NEW BUILDINGS
,ing were A. C. Dixon of Eugene,
i Charles II. Fisher of Eugene, Vernon
im inmirnnnirmr vawter or Medfor(1 and Mrs.
AT I N I V hK SI I Y T- Gerlinger of Portland. The
a UllIIUHUIIl action talcpn fnllmvH authnrirat!
by all absent members of the board.
University of Oregon, Eugene
University buildings destroyed by
fire July 29 will be replaced at once
by new structures to cost between
$60,000 and $70,000. The decision on
the size and general type of the con
struction was reached Saturday by
the executive committee of the board
of regents after consulting with Ellis
F. Lawrence, dean of the school of
architecture and the heads of the
other departments affected by the
fire.
The new structures will replace the
space lost by the department of fine
arts and will provide for the increase
in the enrollment of the school of
architecture. Thi3 will give the
school of journalism, which lost half
of its available floor space the most
convenient quarters of any school of
journalism in the west.
The plans also will take care of thi
vastly increased enrollment of the de
partment of chemistry.
The university health service,
whose offices were destroyed by the
fire, will take temporary offices in
the north end of Friendly Hall, for
merly occupied by the library. The
university is trying to obtain a gift of
$50,000, which would give the insti
tution a suitable infirmary.
The constructon authorized includes
the completion of the architecture
quadrangle on the north side of the
campus, with a building of fine arts
and normal arts. The part devoted to
the loan collections will be fireproof
In connection with the rebuilding
of the quarters for the fine and nor
mal arts is a movement to replace
the lost exhibit material with loans.
Not only are a large number of valu
able canvases expected as loans, but
there will be available from time to
time national art collections which
circle about the country for exhibit.
The enclosed court of the quad
rangle will be made harmonious and
beautiful. Floor space" available for
the department will be increased bv
one-third to provide for the increased
enrollment. The architecture school
with its departments of architecture,
fine and normal arts, last year
showed a gain of nearly 100 percent
in its number of students. Between
300 and 400 majors in these depart
ments are expected next year.
Provision for journalism and chem
istry will be made in the new annex
to the east side of McCIure Hall. The
new building will be 50x80 feet, three
stories in height and if brick constructon.
The space on the three floors has
EVANGELISTS HOLDING
MEETINGS AT MONMOUTH
Rev. G. F. Owen and Rev. Arthur
F. Ingler of Namoa. Idaho, assisted
by Rev. G. S. Hunt of Seattle, Rev.
and Mrs. Wells of Salem, and other
workers from Dallas, started a tent
meeting in Monmouth on Thursday
evening and are extending a cordial
invitaton to all Evangelists Owen
and Igler are ministers of wide ex-
been her egg production and tke later
she molts. Poor layers will have
more new wing primary feathers
in July and AuguBt than the good
layers.
EUG ENE FA RM ER SHOWS
BIG PROFIT WITH HOGS
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One of the farms Belected for hoar
feeding demonstrations in Lane
county is that of J. W. Maxwell.
Mr. Maxwell runs a dairy of eiirht
cows, farms some 160 acres of land
and utilizes the by-products on tha
farm with three O. I. C. brood sows
and a boar. The object of the demon
stration is to emphasize the value of
some of the farm wastes as a means
of raising hogs.
The sows farrowed September 10,
bringing 24 pigs after first losses
were counted out. All of the 24 were
kept up to weaning time. The sows
and boar together with the 24 pigs
were allowed free run of a grain
stubble pasture. They were fed 1000
pounds of gram in addition. Nov
ember 25 the weaner pigs worn
weighed up. There were at that timJ
20 pigs as four had been sold for
breeding atock. These 20 pigs
weighed 1194 Bounds. In other word
Mr. Maxwell had 1194 pounds of pork
with no outlay besides the 1000
pounds of grain. The sows and boar
are in excellent breeding condition
and are receiving, ample few! from
the droppings of the dairy cows which
are eating some twelve pounds of
grain daily. This lot of 20 pigs will
be continued oh test. The screening,
wheat and barley equal parts.
They weighed an averK of 59.7
lbs. on November 25, at 85 days old
The second demonstration wan
started at this time and at the enJ
of 119 days they averaged 220 pounds
in weight, at the average age of 6 V4
months.
This had been put on at the rate
of 1.35 pounds ner dav. The irrain
fed was Urley, wheat and corn, with
I
some screening. A total of 9300
I pounds of grain wan fed and 7200
I m ..111.
pounds oi mil.
The grain was charged for at farm
price and tho milk rated at 30 rent
per hundred. I-abor, interent on In
vestment, and depreciation on equip
ment were charged for beside the
grain and milk fed.
The 20 piers brought $5 1 3.5H. The;
tnhil i.xnenHo was $219.63, The
nrofit was $203.96. or $13.20 per
hoir. The selling price for the pigs
was on the buitia of $11.10 per cwt.
nt Eucene.
This demonstration howed clearly
tho value of skim milk for hog feed
ing. It also showed what good
thrifty pigs will do. Mr. Maxwell I
an excellent feeder, had good hogs,
and made a profit out of one of the
farm wantes. Hogs, a few on evrjr
farm, will go a long way toward
making the farm pay.
FOKMKK DALLAS WO.Mav
DI V$ IN A LIU NY mtttn
Albany Mrs. Anna My Kirk
Portland died at ths hoipluj
aunuay louowing a urirf MUt
had ben vlaltlng at the homi.
niater, .Mrs. I. U. A re hart, it gmg
Ore., following s recent
Suturdsy he wat brought hers ft,
treatment. Mrs. Kirk wai bon K
Pallas, ure., July 17. 1872. St,.-
the daughter of Mr. and Mn. Lu
Clow. Her mother, three dsujtaa
three aUters and a brother tw,
The body was taken to Kufrene when
the funeral wit held Thurndiy
2 o'clock.
Audacity U the utrpfathrr of tv
ce.
New York man wooed and won b
bride by mall, which U the mott .
pensive correspondence school fur
known.
n&xsssmh
1 SSS) (I SSI I
HOP GROWERS!
ATTENTION
Let us supply your pickers with
all needed articles of groceries,
clothing and shoes, etc. at
SPECIAL LOW PRICES
in some instances way below
wholesale cost.
SHOP WHERE THE CROWDS BUY p-
Rev. Arthur F. Ingler
perience in evangelism having trav
elled in nearly all the states and in
parts of the Canadian provinces.
They have held meetings in different
churches and in large campmeetings
in the south and central states with
gratifying results.
Rev. Owen is a preacher of marked
ability and Rev. Ingler a singer of
national reputation, having composed
many useful hymns and edited four
hymn books, and is a writer for sev
eral weekly journals of the middle
west. Services will be held in tho
tent every day at 2:30 and 7:30 p. m.
until further notices.
PREMIUM COUPONS
given with all puirhie of 50c
or more
MAIL ORDERS
promptly filled and returned the
unme day as received
FREE FARE
one way to all purthaer of fl'i
r over (augar purrhs'e nut in
eluded) 20 mile radiun limit.
SATISFACTION C.UAR
AKTEEI) OK MONEY
BACK
LL-Jl I LJ -J LJJLy LJ -
$5.50 JERSEY QO ( cS S fSf S Oj S O J S O J S C ( 1 cJ
SPORT JACKETS $2.98 ) Uj
. I .
BULLETIN TELLS HOW
TO CULL WEAK
SISTERS
Poultrymen must continue keeping
at a loss low Droducinc hens, or enll
their flock 'either by trapnest or ex
ternal characteristics. A hen's abil
ity to produce profitably is indicated
by her vigor, shape of body, temper
ament. Color of skin. wirltiS nf uAr
Leen divided equally between these depth and pliability of abdomen, and
vwo ucpanmems, wun tne provision-1 time or year for molting. (Extension
LADIES' EARLY FALL STYLES CI QQ
FELT HATS Special Prices Jl.O
UP
Ladies' 25c Ribbed Vests, Special ... 9c
Lalies' $2 Pure Silk guaranteed Hose .. 98c
New Flannels in all colors, Special... 11c
Beautiful Flowered and Striped
Dress Goods, Special at yd 19c
Ladies' 75c Silk Lisle Hose
All colors, Special at 35c
Children's Cotton Ribbed Hose
Black only, Special at 7c
42x36 inch Muslin Pillow Cases Special 19c
that as soon as a new chemistry
tuilding is obtained McCIure and its
annex will be devoted entirely to
journalism. The old journalism
"shack" will be moved southward
and still will be used by the jouma'-
Bulletin 347, Suggestive Points in !
culling the Poultry Flock, H. E. Cos- j
by, tells the particulars.) i
Culling for good layers begins I
with selection of eggs for hatching; j
chicks are culled when fist hatched, '
72x90 Heavy
BED SHEET1S
69c
"t.v J JUU1 llOi" ' v"iv
ism scnooi, giving that school ade- and again when transferred to !
quate housing-, for the present, fjr brooder: whenever weak or mntv
what is now one of the best equipped
schools of journalism in the country.
Authority to add another member
to the teaching: faculty in journalism
was granted by the regent.a The
school had 142 major students Ia3i
' year, having- shown remarkable
growth.
The expansion in the space for
chemistry already had been decided
before the fire and plans had been
completed for a ?15,000 annex to
McCIure hall for chemistry alone.
This department, which forms a basis
for the work of the medical school
as well as for science, was using last
year no more space than was gran
ted it when the entire university en.
rollment was no more than its enroll
ment now is, approximately 400.
The administration's plan, Presi
dent Campbell said, is to rush con
struction on the building to be ready
for the fall enrollment in October.
In any event this date will not be
missed far, it is expected, and pro
vision will be made for temporary
housing should construction be de
layed. Members of the board at the meet-
chicks are discovered they are culled
out; and pullets that are a few
months later starting to lay than the
average are discarded. Culling is a
365-day watching for unprofitable
hens, but it pays.
Hens that are large and coarse and
have small sunken eyes are big
eaters, poor layers, and belong
rightly to the beef class.
In yellow-skinned breeds the same
pigment that gives certain parts of
the skin their yellow color also colors
the yolk of the ee-sr. As the hen
starts laying this pigment breaks up
and disappears vent, eye-ring, beak,
skin and shanks. When she quits
laying the color returns in the same
order but more rapidly. Hence the
presence or absence of color give3
the skilled poultryman an indication
of whether or not each hen is laviner.
Lack of color mav be produced bv
sickness, or lack of yellow corn and
green feed. Good judgment does not
cull on color alone.
Since hens begin moltiner when
they stop laying, the late molters are
likely to be the best layers. The
later the hen lavs the creater has
Ladies' 75c Mercerized Unionsuits. 3 dif
ferent styles to select from Special 27c
" One Big lot Silk or Kid Gloves,
Values t o$2 to close out at 29c
Heavy Crepe de Chine, yd. Special 95c
$1.98 Silk Messalinp and Taffetas
All colors, Special ...$1.19
"rleavy Canton Crepe, 5 different shades
Special at .: $2.49
New Dress Gingham, Special per yd. 15c
i , J
HEAVY GRANITE STEW aa
KETTLES large sizes, regular fi
!.l"!LtQ 25c"ther bi i)iecc3 in
SURPRISE SAVINGS ON
GROCERSES
Blue Ribbon Flour, guaranteed for good
bread or money back, 1 sack . 1.. $1.59
100 pounds Cane Sugar 7.14
5 pounds Coffee 1.00
5 pounds Cocoa in bulk ..45
5 Cans Milk, tall ... 45c
5 Cans Milk, small ... . " 25c
5 Cans Corn " . .60
5 Cans Standard Tomatoes . .63
5 Cans Peas ,63
5 Cans Salmon .60
C Cans Fresh Red Salmon 80
5 pounds Hard Rice .40
0 pounds White Beans ...40
5 pounds Lard v ... .78
5 pounds Peanut Butter" in bulk." .70
Meat, Breakfast Bacon .. .28
Bacon Backs. -.24,1
uaiogna or Weiners . ....19
100 pounds New Spuds .... 2.40
Watermelons per pound -.02
Canning Supply of all kinds "below the
isenijwnoljsale price
THE OESQRK CAN AND DOEs'sil
- ww.ii iiuto Tor j litiV
32 piece dinner sets
We have received from a
large importer 250 sets of
this fine lot of porcelain
ware. Handsomely decorat
ed, gold and colored band
dinner sets. Regular price
is $7.50 reduced for Satur
day to
At $4.98
Men s jji.bu JJress Shirts .... 89c
Heavy Blue Work Shirts .... 49c
Men's $4 Corduroy Pants 2.98
Men's 25c Heavy Cotton Sox lie
$2.50 Khaki Riding Pants.. 1.69
Khaki and Outing Clothes at at
tractive price reductions
100
MEN'S AND YOUNG
MEN'S SUITS
Good anappy style, fine woolen ma-
J? 8,i!e8 for men and young
rheSe are advance shipment of
Many values to $25,
terial,
men
Fall styles.
Will j?o at $11.75
No. 2 Galvanized
WASH TUBS
Special at
83c
25c CUPS AND SAUCERS
Reduced to 15c
Urge size WASH BOILERS
Regular price $2.75
Special at $1.98
SHOP WHERE THE CROWDS BUY-PEOPLES CASH
rturLtb CASH STORE SALEM AND EUGENE