Independence enterprise. (Independence, Or.) 1908-1969, August 04, 1922, Page PAGE FOUR, Image 4

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    Page Four
THE
(Bireat Caravan
At independence, Tuesday, Aug. 22
A vast spectacle. You've never seen anything
like it before.
EVERYTHING FREE
Interesting Educational Entertaining
Free Demonstrations. Lectures. Movies
Radio Concerts
INDUSTRIAL AND POWER FARMING
EXPOSITION ' .
z
I
Stewart Motor Co.
C. A. ELLIOTT, Owner and Manager
INDEPENDENCE, OREGON
WOOD SEPARATOR
STORAGE BATTERY
U"7
An Underpriced
Battery
Sim Heckle says his wife ought to be saving: money.
Bobbed hair less grief .with the hairdresser! Short
skirts less cloth to pay for! '
But where Sim gets bumped is in the extra bills
for silk stockings and little hats.
Some of the short-skirt, bobbed-hair batteries
we've met up with are just about as saving as Sim's
wife! Big economy on the surface big expense in
the long run.
The CW Battery (Wood Separator) is a battery
that wears a calico dress and old fashioned stockings.
But you can take our word for it the value's there!
Sizes for all cars; and we stand back of every one we
sell.
Price: for 6-volt, 11-plate $18.35
GROT H Electric Station
Representing
Willarcl Batteries
(THREADED RUBBER INSULATION) 5
and Batteries
(WOOD SEPARATORS)
HUiu,iiuMaiiu nauiui
Repairing
CYLINDER GRINDING, MACHINE WORK,
WELDING, FORGING OF ALL KINDS
BLACKSMITHING and WAGON WORK (
AUTO WHEEL REPAIRING, TIRES RESET
COMPLETE STOCK OF JAHN'S PISTONS,
RINGS AND WRIST PINS
for all makes of cars
MICHELEIN and SOUND TIRES and TUBES
Independence Iron Writs
Halladay, Justin & Wood
Independence, Oregon
Place Your Orders Now with
Enterprise r Hop Tickets
INDEPENDENCE ENTERPRISE
Friday, August 4, 1922
MONMOUTH BANK WILL
SOON OCCUPY NEW HOME
Monmouth, Aug. 2 Beginning as
a private concern in the eighties, the
First National bank of this city,
which is preparing to move into its
I new brick and stone structure on Main
and Knox streets, nas witnessed n
steady growth without a misfortune
to mar its career. The business wo
incorporated by D. T. Stanley while
he was president of the Oregon State
normal school. Due to the activity
of P. L. Campbell, who followea
Stanley as president of the normal
school, the business was reorganized
as the Polk county bank under state
laws, June 16, 1 1890. On the first
board of directors were P. L. Camp
bell, Frank S. Powell, J. B. V. Butler,
I. M. Simpson, A. B. Griggs, John
B. Stump, and I. A. Macrum ot
Portland. J. B. V. BuUer and 1.
M. Simpson are still serving in this
capacity. Frank S. Powell, A. B.
Griggs and 1. A. Macrum have
passed away. P. L. Campbell was
the first president and I. A. Macrum
was vice-president. The remaining
positions from cashier to janitor were
held by Ira C. Powell, the present
president of the institution.
J. H. Ilawley served as president
from 1903 until his death in 1911,
when he was succeeded by J. B. V.
Butler. In 1915 Ira C. Powell was
elected president and has since been
active manager of the business.
In 1911 the bank was reorganized
as the First National Bank.
During the panics of 1893 and 190T,
when many banking houses went un
der, the local bank came through witn
strong cash reserves and a minimum
of losses.
With the history of the banking
business in Monmouth is woven the
defeats and triumphs incident to the
establishment of the normal school
system in Oregon. When state aid
was withheld the bank supplied funds
to keep the normal school in opera
tion, and it became the headquarters
for the campaign that terminated lit
the re-establishment of the institution
by popular vote in 1910.
The policy of the bank since its
beginning has been to support the
business interests of the whole com
munity and at the same time keep
within the bounds of safety with
liquid interests.
The bank has occupied its present
location since 1896, when the two-1
story brick building, erected in 1890,'
was destroyed in the big fire that,
burned almost the entire business '
section of Monmouth. '
The new building is of brick and
cast stone construction. It is 52 by
41 feet in size, and 28 feet in height.
Four large stone pillars present an
imposing appearance at the entrance
on Main street The inside is finishes
in walnut with marble base and has
an eighteen-foot ceiling. In addition
to the commodious lobby there is a
community room with fireplace, a
private room for directors, and a
savings deposits room.
r. rowers DO TWO
MILLION DOLLAR BUSINESS
A report recently completed by the
Oregon Growers Cooperative assoc
iation in connection with the annual
audit shows thut during the past year
business through the sule of fruit
amounting to nearly $2,000,000. Seg
regate! into accounts for the differ
ent fruits the report is as follows:
Apples I522.4U.1I
p. ... 258,042.1
I Dried Prunes 843.577.9W
Cherries 83,40l.3
Beards 148,141.32
Nuts - 26,495.00
Vegetables 33,882.99
Plums and Green Prunes .. 23,882.10
Dried Apples J 322.50
Grapes 1.712.39
Apricots 19,212.33
Peaches - 19.516.00
It is believed that this year' busi
ness will total $3,000,000 or more.
The association is now actively opcr
ating in practically all of the prin
cipal fruit districts in Oregon and
controls over 3200 acres of fruit,
which acreage is steadily growing.
A partial closing of the 1921 pruno
pool and the mailing of checks to its
1300 prune grower members, total
ing over $91,000 was announced early
thia week bv the Oreeon Growers-
Cooperative association. This will be.
followed by another, and final pay
ment immediately after the disposal
of a small quantity of the larger sizes
which have been held for higher
prices.
The supply of the larger prunes is
limited and with a large crop coming
on with little prospect for large size
prunes, it is believed the unsold sup
ply will return very satisfactory
prices.
Prune harvest prices have been set
by the association as follows: Pick
ing, 8c per bushel, if the pickers
work throughout the season, other
wise the price will be 6c; drier help
and other labor $3 per day, and kiln
men, $5.
Aphis on cabbage and kale plant
are particularly bad this year in many
parts of Oregon. Black leaf-40 di
luted according to directions on the
package will clean them out when
properly applied. A good soap suds
rather than clear water will assist
in spreading the solution, making it
more effective and economical of
labor and material. O. A. C. Ex
periment Station.
FARM POINTERS
Silage U an Insurance against
long winter and short hay crop,
well as n economical feed for sheep
and cattle. The full value of the alio
was felt in the Into hard winter with
hay out of sight. The Union exper -ment
atatlon has found that a combi
nation of hay and silage produces
twice the daily gii t hlf th at
of glns on huy alone.O. A. C. Ex
tension Service.
When anta become troublesome
whole colonies may be destroyed by
i.inr m tnmxnoonf ui of tartar emetic
with a tablespoonful of honey, spread-
ing it on a piece of bread and placing
mi. t.it in the txtth of the ants.
They carry portions of the poisoned
honey to their young at well as eai
of it themselves. O. A. C. Experi
ment Station.
Land in the Willamette valley that
Is to be sown to fall crop can be
disced to advantage before the fall
rain. This puts the land in shape
so that it can be plowed earlier,
which is an essential thing for sue-
cessful fall sown grain. O. A. C.
Experiment Statton.
Shlpalffl Rubber.
A new case for shipping sheet rob
ber has been Introduced Into Hinge
pore shipping circles by an American
tlrm. These reach local exporters In
the form of sheets mad of 1 Pr
cent fiber, the riveting, packing and
-irln hKlnit ilnne bv the Milliliter.
The thinner of the sheets enables the
esses built from them to hold from 12
to 23 per cent more weight of rubber
than the old wooden boxes, snd the
new construction Is practically un
breakable, very cleanly and water
proof. Scientific American.
ONLY$2.7Q
INDEPENDENCE to
PORTLAND
and return
BALK DATES
I V LINES I I
RETURN LIMIT
Tuesday following sals fct,
ASK AGENT ABOUT
15 Day and Season tnt
Frequent Service at Convenient
Hours with all modern trim
cemforte.
For further particulars uk
gents
John m. scorr
General Passenger Agetn
Spsschs's Quickly Rsporttd.
When (ioveroor Miller of New York
wake a icech he take along three
of tils own stenographers, a type
writer, and a mimeographing machine.
The BtenogrHphers work In shifts, so
tint tuple of his upeech mode In New
York recently were available min
utes and 10 wvond after he bad
spoken the lust word. Kxcbange.
Changs of Subjsct.
"IH you think Mars Is InhubltedT
Tin looking the matter up." replied
Senator Sorghum, "along with evolu
tion. My wife says we men bnve made
such ii muddle as polltliiun that It's
time we took ip science or literature
or something."
The Enterprise is still fl.60 a year
HOOD IlIVEJt MECCA
FOR EDITORS NEXT YBAI
Hood River with a free trip to Hi
Hood will be the editorial YKn
next year, as that attraction hu Un
selected by the Oregon Editorial u
sociation. This la one of the clowl;
organised agricultural dMricti rf
Oregon with numerous community
centers lying near the countyMjt,
This makes ideal conditions for i
good rural news service, both ptpwj,
Hood River Glacier and Hood Eire
News, having featured largely in Qs
community news contest by wliwitj
a place In every entry made. 8ttit
the newspapers will be almoit u i
a treat as seeing the big orrhjirdt
and the big mountain.
A little knowledge l a dangnvu
thing, especially when it li a llttn
knowledge of driving an uUmt,tl.
Home is a place in which nxxttn
sons and daughters sleep when mrj
thing else Is closed.
Drs. Hewett A Knott. C!um
fitted, satisfaction guaranteed. fl7-tf
Minnesota Picnic
Minnesota picnic at the state fair
grounds, Salem, Tuesday,' Aug. 8.
Former Minnesotians invited. Bring
lunch baskets.
Privilege of Nobility.
Lord Denbigh, whose coat-of-arms
displays, appropriately enough, three
carving knives. Is nominally bead-carver
to the king of England. Similarly,
Lord Mount Edgecomb Is head butler;
Lord Abergravenny, grand steward of
the psntry; Lord Rothes, stirrup hold
er ; Lord Winchester, cup bearer ; while
the duke of Newcastle Is privileged to
give support to the sovereign's arm
when fatigued by the -burden of the
scepter.
To the bishop of Durham snd Bath
belongs the right of the bestowal of
the ryal person if the king succumb
to falntness. Custom, too, requires
that the archbishop of Canterbury
shall prepare a bowl of soup should
bis Britannic majesty require It.
an
WATCH
ON STANDARD MAKE TIRES
SO M ETHING
D O I.N'
What Is the Next Stop? '
In New Zealand there Is In use an
automatic device for telling railway
passengers . ue name or me nexi m
tlon. The names of the various sta
tions are printed on a roll, wnich Is
rotated by toothed wheels. A "tripper"
Is placed about on the track or by Its
side, between each stution. and tills Is
so adjusted as to strike a lever on the
passing car. The motion is communi
cated to the toothed wheels governing
the roll bearing the station names, and
the ringing of an automatic bell an
nounces to the passengers the fact that
the nunie of the next station Is on
view. '
Wonderful Imagination.
A bright boy was asked by bis gov
erness to write a description of his
liiiaginury) travels in Italy. She was
Tiither staggered, however, when she
read : "After sailing about Venice on
a gorgonzola and being disappointed
in the siuallness of the boasted
'Bridge of Size,' I went on to Home.
Again I was disappointed. The Coli
seum there compared unfavorably
with the one in London. The macu
ronl fields were white for harvest, but
the spaghetti w;ts i.aly Jiint In bloom,
Tuere was nothing on ut the Vatl
combs, as the pope no longer lives
underground."
The HOT SPOT STROMBERG CARBRUAT0U
Is a Winner
Ask those who are using them: Percy Dickinson
Ed. Wunder, Ernie Riddell, Armine Cooper.
Our second shipment has arrived.
BIG CUT IN STUDEBAKER PRICES
, Ranging from $70 to $200
We are having many inquiries about the New
, Starr. They will be ready for delivery here in
f a few weeks. They will have all of the desira
ble features of the new Durant, and will '
absolutely be the biggest car value on the
marker.
STROMBERG 7 Independence Garage
btKVlUt 5IAIIUN
G. C. Skinner
7J