Independence enterprise. (Independence, Or.) 1908-1969, September 17, 1920, Page PAGE SIX, Image 6

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    INDEPENDENCE
ft Olvmrak tine
If You Can't Get 'Em Up
Try serving fluffy, brown hot cakes
made with 5?IM3B Flour' and
there'll be a merry scramble for the
breakfast table. Every one likes pan
cakes for breakfast :sort of bucks one
up for a good day. And with (EOSTbEOS
Pancake Flour they're so easy to make.
Just add equal parts water or milk.
M Other favorites with the folks are (HBEEtE
Wheat Hearts and the goodies made from
(D5Z5E03 Flour.
... -.
Wherever stock and poultry are raised for profit
and not pastime, they know some of the following
EZEHE Feeds:
SCRATCH FEED HORSE FEED HOG FEED
EGG MASH STOCK FEED DAIRY FEED
CRATE FATTENER MOLASSES FEED CALF MEAL.
(( j
i 1 - f -IL. i r 1 I
1ilr it'll
i ft i i m . mi v
FLOUR FEED - CEREALS
ENTERPRISE
LEAN G ERM AN HOUSEHOLPS
Berlin-How the erstwhile well-to-dX
in present day Con-y
the Allgcmeuio "
functionary.
T1MUER SUITLY GOES FAST,
T U. S. REl'ORT STATES
The timber of the United State
unod 'und uoHiroyeu iuur
now timber U grow-
SEPTEMBER 17 M
children
bcinsr
described in
a married man ilh '"'"
of living is reduced to inns .
Prussia, ' according
OREGON CANNERS FIRST
IN FAIR CONTESTS
The Oregon state champion can
ning' team defeated state champions
from Washington, Idaho, and Mon
tana at the Interstate fair, Spokane,
September 9 The team is made up
of Millie Nelson, 15, Amy Gustaf
son, 14, and Etta Anderson, 14, of
Multnomah county. They won at
the state fair last fall, and have
since taken special work at 0. A. C.
summer school. The club has can
ned 548 quarts of fruit this Jear, as
a club, and 275 each as individuals.
They were coached by Miss Helen
Cowgill, assistant state leader.
rector. A committee of three mem
bers was appointed for western Ore- j
gon and three for eastern Oregon to 1
prepare planssand submit them to a
general convention to be held later.
George A. Mansfield, president of the
Jackson county bureau, P. O. Powell,
president of the Polk county bu
reau, and 0. R.- Dougherty, presi
dent of the Clackamas county bu-
I roan nro t.Vif committee for western
Oregon. J. H. Dobbin, president of
the Wallowa county bureau, Albert
Hunter, president of the Union coun
ty bureau, and W. W. Harrah, mem
ber of the executive committee of
the Umatilla county bureau, are the
commttee for eastern Oregon.
eight tons already gathered there has
not been a box of No.2 pears in the
lot. Mr. Harding has sold $5500
worth to date and will have at least
$1000 worth more of pears this Rea
son, bringing his crop up to $6500
from the ten acres, or $G50 an acre.
This orchard has not missed produc
ing a good crop of pears since Mr.
Harding has taken it in hand, and
he says that he will place it against
any orchard large or small, in any
of the Western states, California included.
in a fah
ho writes
laborer.
"I own a fine mansion
Ri.rlin suburb,"
rooms furnished, and w. 1 ho" to
restrict our own apartments st.ll fui-
il. ...
"Before the war we breakfasted on
i , ...v.ifn irpnd and but-
ceres anu dhcuh,
to ... ..,,1 oiiirsir!
ter, and tea witn cream ....
with thin gruel, black bread, no but.
tor or sugar, ana uw
ficiar jam.
"Onlv once or twice
moot nnnear on the
-rr ,
wine nas o w
a week does
dinner table;
nm'nr a ioillt.
abolished. Supper consists of por
ridge, herrings or cheese. Before the
war, the family used seven pints of
milk daily; now a quarter of a pint
is the allowance.
"Clothes are worn threadbare; my
son mends my shoes and my (laughter
cuts my hair.
"Letter writing has become too ex
pensive. I tear off unused half
sheets of letters received and use old
envelopes, inside out. Baths are cut
down to one-half.
"We can no longer afford to enter
tain company to meals; we meet our
friends after supper.''
The present lean times, the writer
confesses, have not impaired his
health very much, although he says
he has become "somewhat spare in
body."
is
i ..a fust AS
mill's ., L ....I. ...I.
in and w timber mo nio
lo ami most needed part of the mid
is beintf M five and one-half times
ns fast a it i produced, nccordnjr to
a report of the forest service follow
in a complete study of the forrtit
situation of thin "ry '
Lumber from the Pacific Const,
which heretofore was shipped only
in small quantities into the Southern
iuuI Eastern markots on account of
tho .cost of transportation, In now
m a result of the depletion of timber
ivmrarop of these parti of the coun-
. . i M t...nu!1u tn a1in
try, ni'intr arawn um nr' ---
ply tlie needs of the
Huntera states.
h is estimated that at least 80,000
ooii acres of former timber land are
now unproductive waste and that
much more is only partly productive,
while firea are causing further de
terioration. ,'
Following the completion and atudy
of the report, a program has been
outlined to bring about a change in
the situation. This will be a perma
nent one and will greatly affect the
fundamentals of the present program
of the forest service and government.
Southern
i
and
THE COMMON RLESSINGS
OF COUNTRY LIFE
FARM BUREAUS TO FEDERATE
1 INTO STATE ORGANIZATION
The county farm bureaus of Ore
gon will federate into a state bu
reau if the recommendations' of the
farm bureau officials who recently
met in conventions are followed,
says Paul V. Maris, extension di-
PEAR CROP FROM TEN ACRES
"WILL AMOUNT TO $6500.
BEES NEED WINTER
PROTECTION 'FOR RESULTS
Roseburg One of the finest Bart
lett pear orchards in the entire West
is the ten acre tract belonging to
W. C. Harding. This year the crop
of pears all graded No. 1, fancy, and
brought $95 a ton. Out of the fifty-
Bees do not hibernate as most in
sects do, but keep the ' temperature
f the colony . above 5? degrees in
cold weather by forming a tight
duster and producing heat by the
movement of wings, legs and other
parts of the body. Good winter pro
tection feaves bee vitality and honey.
For description of a good winter
packing case send to Extension ser
vice, O. A. C, Corvallis.
It's a cinch
to figure why
s -zArti
IS
' LL- ,..J.I" - m
''
, t.J '
K ttiffiiasii&DOMEsncMi
I i BLEND W
11 f
n it I j j j
'
In order to be out daily in the open
air and stll make enough money for
his expenses a young countryman
took a position as a rural letter car
rier. During his ' term of service,
which was in a rich fruit region, he
was hardly ever asked to share the
bounties of the orchard. The farm
ers were not stingy and the young
people were his friends; they simply , union
under estimated the blessings of the
abundance of fruit, flowers and veg
etables. i
Young people in the country are
so used to the blessings and priv
ileges peculiar to farm life that they
often ignore them. A city girl who
sought to interest her country cousins
in the work of giving away wind-falls
and cull peaches to the poor of the
nearest city had a hard time to con
vince them that anyone could possib
ly want such things. On the farms
the pigs ate the windfalls, and it was
hard to believe that in cities there
were little children thankful even
for the waste things of the country.
A young girl from the country
who spent a summer in a city flat
and saw earth for window boxes sold
at fifty cents a bu;,hel went home
with more respect for her flower
bed than she had ever had before.
After that she shared with city
people the blossoms that once she
had thought too poor to give away.
If all the young men and the young
women in the land would only or
ganize themselves into a Waste Prod
ucts League, they could wonderfully
increase the sum of human happiness.
Without ever parting with any.
thing that they could sell on the
farms or that was needed at home,
they could furnish good cheer and
happiness to numbers of invalids, old
people and children in the cities
Youths Companion.
TOO MUCH BAD CREAM
USED TO MAKE BUTTER ;
EYES
-ItlKl ,t m .
Ut.lwi..!' ..,.. ..I. I .
your child's cyealght I,
cd.
lutitij
-Many a child ha,
possible to ntudy beca
trouble.
of
Many children are cro
You should know why Camels
are so unusual, so refreshing, so
satisfying. First, quality second,
Camels expert blend of choice Turkish
and choice Domestic tobaccos which
youll certainly prefer to either kind
smoked straight ! '
Camels blend ' makes possible that "
wonderful mellow mildness yet all the
desirable body is there 1 And, Camels
never tire your taste I
You'll appreciate Camels freedom
from any unpleasant cigaretty after-'
taste or unpleasant cigaretty odor 1
For your own satisfaction compare
Camels puff by puff with any ciga
rette in the world at any price 1
Cmmala an mold everywhere in scientifically sealed packages of HO ciVJa- -rette
for 20 centa ; or ten package ( 200 cigarettes) in a tlaaains'
paper -covered carton. . We strongly recommend this carton for the
boms or office supply or whan you travet t
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO, Wioiton-Salem, N. Cr
The main trouble with the butter
scored in the first educational scor
fiicr contest at O. A. C. in August was
"neutralizer." Much of the cream
had been delivered sour, and some of
it rather aged. The flavor is not
seriously objected to for storage, but
is too often associated with "stale
and musty" flavors. It indicates
lack of use of the acid tost, whieh
will help makers get away from the
"dump and taste" plan.
Industrial Review
of Oregon
Western yellow pine held by ex
perts to be the most perfect pine
lumber in the world and commands
highest price.
Movement started to build armory
at Medford.
Oregon road fund gets $589,094
motor fuel tax for roads.
North Bend working for county
ferry, community building and own-your-home
program.
Silvorton gets increased telephone
rates. ,
North Bend National Bank in
creases capital to $75,000.
Portland to build $6,000,000 bridge
in place of old Burnside span.
Sta.v p.iHo:i to undertake furnt
tire ntunufarturi.
Portlanu stock Jeer industry uses
million gallon cargo of molasses.
Florence-Five districts unite for
high school here.
Countrv banks report farmers
with few" debts and holding grain.
Higher prices will probably prevail
unless there is over-productidn.
Roseburg has housing famine.
Portland Vernon district to have
$100,000 standpipe erected.
Ladd & Tilton Bank gives em
ployes five per cent bonus on year'
salary.
Portland S. P. Co. will erect elec
tric power station on Fourth street.
Last link of 14-mile pavement to
Astoria being rushed.
Portland Goodrich Rubber Co.
to bulid large concrete warehouse.
The Dalles will erect a $125,000
auditorium.
The Dalles citizens took up sewer
bond issue at par.
Largest prune drier in state is be
ing built at West Salem capacity
2000 bushels per day.
Monroe Willamette valley pep
permint crop will net 10,000 pounds
oil worth $8 a pound. ,
Motor car registrations in Oregon
total ?1,927,439. ,
State highway expenditures n
August exceeded $2,000,000. , -
Salem Automotive building to be
erected for the state fair.
Gresham County fair will pro
mote milk goat industry.
Reedsport sawmills make large
lumber Shipments by water. '
Portland New Jersey railroad
orders 3,000,000 feet Douglas fir.
Wasc, county wheat yield one
million bushels. '
Myrtle Creek ha3 a million . pound
prune crop. ' . '
Newport grants franchise to Tort
land and West Coast railroad .'company.
Salem may be location of a
sulphide pulp industry. , ,
Roseburg Pear crop harvest
starts; quality of fruit exceptionally
good.
vttwtm-im 'ft-imtf fin an- .
(KEROSENE)
FOR OIL HEATERS
CQOKSTOVES
AND LAMPS
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
lit UHNIA)
big
GRADUATE OF ARMY
LANDS $3000 JOB
stewards' class
"rltable from
the
name
-Lack of glasse. at thint,,
oring life-time of
and expense.
-An wamlnntlon will detent
exact condition and needi of
All It- ... .
i-niiu b eyes ail youll b
know.
Morris&KeeneOptical
Eyndght SpeclalMi
Entrance 205
Salem Bank of Commcrtt El
Salem, Oregon.
We pay the expense!
We' sret results
We remit result
We take the blame
No Collection No Char?
Why Maintain a Morgue?
Send us your slow one
KNIGHT ADJUSTMENT CI
Mc Minnville, OregiJ
AMERICAN LEGION
SENDS HER ABRO
Vj-' :. .' a I.:'1, ", J
" ' I
Mrs. Wendell Phillip of
York, the only woman to b u
ed the Congressional Medal of
or, has born delegated by the
Leffi-m to thJ inter-allied
ference ot Brussels, Belgium, !
10 .iiMo Fnrone's method
habilitating her war-disabled.
Robert Dollar interests
Monarch lumber plant.
Harrisburg New ferry
Willamette being built.
Albany Work started oivne
co Wood Produces company muj
t.!..,,,, w.irk to start oq
IMJOVUUIg '
ler-Crater Lake cut-off roan.
Nyssa Excavation for ne 1
building begrun.
Washington "Our company ' will
be mighty glad to get some of. the
young men when they are discharged
from the army," remarked an officer
of the Schultz Baking company of
Chicago a few days ago, when ' he
wns inspecting the. army schools at
Camp Grant, 111., with a party of
Chicago business men, who wqre
guests of the recruiting officer of
the camp.
They had just been looking over
the school for bakers and cooks, and
nad seen the hotel
at work
Not long afterward Sergeant Rich
ard C. Ivo, who was taking the courao
was about to be discharged and the
Schultz Baking Company was not
ified, n As a result the young man
j went to the Chicago company as in-
r'uuur ,n evr brend making de
' partment at a salary of $3000 a year.
3pp 11
UNIVERSITY!
OREGON
-l.,.ininedbyhe
in order th-Mbeyoun
pie of Oregon nny" ,
a liberal education.
Literature. Science ond tM
Cr.du.te School. .h. SM(.(
cat Eduction. "nd,. tha,porlW
Arphltcct... Commerce, Jo"' .
Eduction .nd MuJ.
High ttndrd. of c o
md.po..ibl bY .n.ble l
. i i.:..,.(,,rips una
qulppe ibiw"
ncour"!
nearly 100,000 mhmco.
...l,l,iic ore "cl
uperv.eU tbA
and eiery ati.-r.tioi. . v' '
'.ndwellreoftl.eludent.
With hni-'"""1 ln'i
tninei by ih,
orpuMioHUI'P""1" , .r
(. wn.rl.. '" I
lartfedcrelo..!.'"" """
For a eclogue or for ..nr. j
address: