Independence enterprise. (Independence, Or.) 1908-1969, August 13, 1920, Page PAGE FOUR, Image 4

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    Irage lour
3uiU pi itteur ,3E uttrjins
Published Every Friday by
Z. C KIMBALL.
Subscription Rates
One Year
Six Months ' Vj!L
MONMOUTH VIEW ON HIGHWAY
The Monmouth Herald has discovered "that sentiment
in the state at large is with the highway commission in
its plans 'for building the state roads in a systematic
plan." We are wondering if the Herald would have
been able to "discover" this sentiment had Monmouth
been left off the route of the highway.
There was likewise "sentiment" in Germany support
ing the Kaiser in his outrage of Belgium. So is there
Ken?f atSrinp the repell of the eighteenth amend
ment to the constitution and a sentiment can be ci eat ed
for many other things which may have been decreed un
lawful. This same sentiment may be created by inten
tional misrepresentation as has been the. case m this high-
Wa4eaEntrerprise still maintains that a very. large ma
jority of the people of Oregon are law abiding. That
hey believe in a strict enforcement of protons o
the statutes. If this- supposition is correct, then senti
ment is not in favor of the highway commission violating
a law any more than it would be for the individual.
The Herald is fullv aware that the highway comrms-.,if.-ii
of nf Vip Ipp-islature reces
sion WllllUliy ViUidLcu an "o" y tpfj
ing the endorsement of the people when it attempted
to build the Pacific highway through Polk county wi h-
out going through Dallas ana inaepenuwicc.
"ut AY':. n,ii i iinhnldintr the hiehway com
sLanainir mis, uic uciom , - n .
mission Why? Purely a selfish one. Monmoum
on the highway and will be on the highway even though
the highway commission be compelled to route the high
way as the law specifies. By going direct south from
4.u TdoTioo will hp eliminated, lo pre-
u.-uTo,r nj rna flip Tinrkiarrmte at tne pomi
pare uie iiigiiwa.y onvi v -rn,
selected by the highway commission will cost Polk coun
ty many additional thousands of dollars over what it
r--u -j. -u,, rov of TnHpnpTiflence. The bnter-
Drise wishes to remind the Herald that the rou e south
i - i t. t- V,nftoi. onrl in P irn lMrlLc
from independence is.suuilci, ucuu " " -
HiffiVnlt. river crossing. As tne
ilea. v v wauco aim "
county has to build the bridges and prepare the road for
paving, thousands ot dollars womt vcu w
county taxpayers.
Here's what the Herald says:
"That sentiment in the state at large is with the hig hway commis
sion in its Plan for building the state road on a systematic plan is
evident lo everyone who has taken the trouble to investigate . There
is a so reason to oe nopeiui wneie u; - - y ---- , - ,
the court in its decisions has shown a disposition to look at the wel
io It th tot broadlv and not stop at technicalities. Two opin
ions have been had of the road situation in Polk county one by At
torney General Brown and the other by Judge McCourt. Both
torney ut neidi . o . . . t option bv the commis-
were uasea on leciuiaamrca a& m ...... ---- -
. sion would satisfy the letter of the law. Judge Stapleton it is evi
dent, might have come to a still different conclusion. In the Kid
dle case the court ruled the commission must not be 1 mP b?
... . ii.. f nMmn pnni-ta Jnrio-o Mc Court WOU1U
coninct witn me opinions uj- .uu.. - ---1
substitute for county courts, circuit judges who would decide where
the road should be built. We gravely doubt if -the supreme court
having abolished the dictation of county courts, would hold the
commission subject to the dictation of circuit judges in laying out
the highways of the state."
The Herald is fully aware that the Riddle case was
'Tn the Riddle case Commis-
llVJt OllllllCtl -vj wiv - m . - -
sioner Benson made certain definite promises and then
repudiated them. The legislature did not provide the
trio Viicrhwav as it did in Polk county.
The Enterprise is unable to find any court decisions
i i. i .p,t.i,i "Pnib- onuTihr nti "fpfhnifalities.
wnicn iiavt; itvui cu j. um. u""uj "
There is nothing very technical about a law which says a
certain thing and in a language which 'the ordinary
school boy can comprehend. This was What Judge Mc
Court based his decision upon.
It's the highway commission which is endeavoring to
put "technicalities" into the law in order that it may be
disobeyed.
The Enterprise continues to maintain that unless the
state highway commissioners can folow the law in rout
ing this highway, or any other act for that matter, it is
up to Governor Olcott to remove them.
LEAGUE DEMOCRATIC ISSUE
HIMES IS MAKING
MM' OF POLK COUN
E. J. llimc. of PiUla was in Mon
mouth Wednesday surveying off t t
art of the Wm. "
v sold to E. Nison. Mr. H. "
pending his odd moment, pveps.
a road map of Polk county. 11.
devised a novel ppra us fo f
the work. With his wife he s '
1 ., ).. thn polllltV n
nir over tne ruaus v.i - - -Sf
car. Ahead of him in the car
he has a ship's compass for Kvmg
levels and spodometer for s;
With Mrs. Himes' help all oi w y
go along and with the infornm u,
r, n is nrenured which
inus given '""t- ,
will without doubt be in donun d
among people who travel u c .
of the county. Monmouth Herald.
POLK COUNTY BREVITIES
here To G
resident I. C. Towell of the Mon
mouth bank, is in Hood River recre
ating. .
New vault fixtures nre 10 w
stalled in the county clerk's office
V.io foil
Vina
Jacob Detong and Dick DeLon
of Ballston, are making prepara
tions for a visit to their native mm.
v M hl1Prt and family of Mon
mouth, are in Newport for a couple
of weeks. W. J. Hastings oi Asn
land, is running Mr. Ebbert's barber
shop during his absence.
M. B. Young has tenderer
resignation as a member of the city
council of Pallas from the second
ward. His successor has not yet
been named.
nnmntrpd bv fire in May, the wortc
of remodeling the Christian church
at Dallas has been completed ami
services have been resumed in the
building.
Triior.i TVifv will be accom-
nnnipd bv their families and expect
to be gone about four months. The
DeLongs came to Polk county in
1911, became citizens six years later,
and have prospered.
A. M. Esson has moved his family
from St. Helens to Monmouth in
order that his' children may have an
opportunity of attending the Nor
mal school. He has purchased tne
P. E. Chase property, the consider
ation being $1,000 ,
Attend the Bible Chautauqua
Th(o smmor .lays everyone is looking for a nice, cool
ftlaTpMSSSOF sixth
""'HE PLACE.
Interesting lectures, thrilling sermons and atoe-for
n !, v .! r ice everv night except Monday nijrht. for
NEXT TWO WEKS, beginning SUNDAY EVENING,
AUGUST 15, at Independence, Oregon, 8 p. m.
The Lecture Sunday night, "The Origin of Sin," gives
,,n n-il mwer to some of the hard questions that
aff I nr - m mU Did Cod Create a Devil? Why
Ev-angx'list J. A. Keibcr gives a Bible answer to all of
these.
Later in the series, B: J. Cody, for 20 yers a missl
o,r rv in the South Sea Islands, will give a steroopticon
lecture of his experiences and show s6me interesting
-m
ll
;icvs of the island life.
ATTEND EVERY NIGHT
SEATS FREE
. A. REIBEli
B. J. CODY
Evangelists
,; -rr-V."T"- ' ' .
CIOVEK KETUUN ESTIMATED
AT OVEK $150 l'EK ACKE
Fisher s.
(Seattle)
Fruit is not the only thing from
which the farmers make money in
this section, says the Dallas Ob
server. Clover, the wonderful fertilizer,
is a highly profitable crop. It not
only puts the soil into condition so
that it will grow a bumper crop or
two of wheat or outs, but first
gives a crop of hay and then fur
nishes a seed crop that makes fann
ing compare to gold mining.
H. B. Fanning, a rancher living
near Eallston, this county, has a
hundred acres in clover this yeir,
and has a stand that is simply su
perb. It is estimated that he will
Egg P
rooiscer
It is all that its name implies and
is being used by many successful
poultrymen. The price
Per hundred ..$4.35
Per ton $82.00
We have a good spray for your
cattle. It is worth while to use it.
.... .w.t tuua than Hix liUiiheU OI
1.1. '
t over sec! to the acre. This mrans
that v wi'.l harvest :!' pounds of
Med to the aire, and that for the
entire I'.'O acres he will thnwh 3),
to:i pounds of the valuable need.
U is considered certain that he will
receive from 1", to f.O cent per
pound for the product. At the lov
, r figure he will r. ll J.i clover need
crop for SI'"'.'-'""-
When it la considered that this
rewind is t come from one crop,
the farming po.-sd ,ilit ii-rt uf t'i"
section U-Khi t.. W"'i"ni' "Vuler'.t.
Mr. Fanning: i an up t-date raiu-h-V,
who ha made u hf? busines cf
pn. luciriK fr m th' oi, hut hin-
he not i-xtr:iorh:i--:.rd.
He, in comrn
insists 'hat farmer
fiom other (H-ctloin of tin
un do equally well here.
H suy in
a y ill thi-:
,v.th ' Miers,
l.iki ModM.
Kind Old Lmly-JWij e.
cryinir, my boy?"
Hu 'To fell down itairi'
Kin.l OS.l I-ady -ftVIl, e
He'll be all right mn
Hoy "Yes, 1 know. But t
ter miw dim full all the i
nevtrr aw nuthiii'." Arcerki
wers.
Marriaj;.- of Tnth m H
Newnniiner "colyumr
tear a 75 per cent tmk
a bridf' wedding rirg-
old, Koniethini; nt-w, Wimtl:,
rowedhut nothing "bine."
Transcript,
The Fall Shoes
Jtre
Here
Independence
Seed Sr Feed Store
"They Have It"
INDEPENDENCE, OREGON
Farmers,
Attention
In his speech accepting the democratic nomination for j
Ohio, has declared that the
acceptance of the league of nations as propounded by
President Wilson will be the paramount issue ill the
democratic campaign. He also urges the ratification
of the woman's suffrage movement and the adoption of
the budget system for handling government expendi
tures. ....
Governor Gox was silent on the voisteaa law, out
promises' dry enforcement, declaring, ."The public ofr
ficial who fails to enforce the law is an enemy both to
r the constitution and the American principle of majority
rule."
The deduction to be derived from Governor Cox's
speech is that he will endeavor to continue along the
same lines which have been so definite during Presi
dent Wilson's regime. ' L
In other words, Mr. Wilson's" declaration that the
league covenant would be submitted to a solemn refer
endum of the people is to be realized through Mr. Coxs
' eahtlidacy. . . - , . . . ,
.The league, issue is. an, important one.. The demo
o4tt la'mw snmrfilv committed in favor of its
adoption; and the republicans want it shorn of all pos
sible' foreign entanglements. Now it's up to the voters: I
, T 1 1 J DCii JfVMA ..... . . . ... . J -
for junk?
We can place it with the new
farmer.
Just think! We'll fix it up.
Livestock of all kinds handled.
Ranches, all sizete, for sale and
rent, with terms. ,
Some like this:
160 acres, $25 an acre, $700 down,
balance seven years. ,
Rents Collected. . Why worry?
We are under bond for you.
Why not list with us now.
Our service gets results.
We buy, sell and exchange.
0 rlowR. White & Co.
254 12th Street . .
- PORTLAND, OREGON
Temporarily at -
' - INEPENDENCE, OREGON :
Phone P 1404, Care Bert Hilke.
All of the latest styles are now read,
for vour insnerrion The men
look for the best in Shoes should
see the Fall Shoes.
Do you. feet Hebe?
IS IT YOUR SHOES. IT MAY BE THAT THEY
CROWD YOUR TOES AND PINCH UNTIL IT STOPS
THE BLOOD FLOW, THEN THE ACHE COMES.
YOU CAN GET REAL SHOE COMFORT, IF YOU LET
yJb rIT YOU.
Prices $7.50 to $16.5(y
You take no chance to lose if you purchase here.
Si!
CP RIQUno n . .
KVERY FAMILY IN MARION AND POLK COUNTY A. PATRON
00
er
I!
l
(Oil
id