Independence enterprise. (Independence, Or.) 1908-1969, November 14, 1919, Image 4

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PROFESSIONAL COLUMN.
R. ELLSWORTH
THE VTEERINARIAN
I 10th and H. Streets.
Phono M 3122.
SWOPE & SWOPE
) Lawyers
J. O. O. F. Building
Independence. ..." Ore.
,
IT HE PALACE
' Main Street
Open day and night we ser'e
meals and lunches atall hours
Try the famous Mt. Hood Ice
Cream. Also barber shop in
connection.
. i - ' '
FLETCHER & BARRICK,
. ATTORNEY'S
' Cooper Building
independence; .. Oregon
FEDERAL FARM LOANS
5"t4 Intrest 34 H years time
Prompt and efficient service..
Oregon National Farm Loan
Association
Largest in the Northwest
A. C. Bohrnstead, Secy-Treas
401 Masonic Temple, Salem,Or
TIME CARD OK VALLEY &
SELITZ RAILWAY.
Elective Sunday June 23th
The Valley & Sileu Railroad will
run a train leaving Independence at
7.45 a. m. going through to Camp One
arriving there 10 a. m. Leaving at
4.45 p. m. arriving' Independence at
7 p. m. leaving at 7.25 p. m. for Hos
kins. Sportsmen will have an op
portunity to whip the Luckimute.
Train will leave Iloskins Saturday
at 6.30 p. m. arrive in Independence
7.45 p. in.
ON OLD ACCOUNTS
WE GET RESULTS
WE REPORT RESULTS
WE REMIT RESULTS
WE PAY THE EXPENSE
WE TAKE THE BLAME.
KNIGHT ADJUSTMENT CO
McMinnville, Ore
Successor to
YAMOREG COLLECTION
AGENCY.
WILLARD
STORAGE BATTERY STATION
We sell, Rent and Repair Bat-
teries- OUR REPAIR WORY
GUARANTEED.
418 Court Street. Salem.
Phone 203
-
Vulcanized
tander. internal
pressure to in
sure even cord
strain distribu-
tioni
r -
jAnd locked
firmly to the!
rim by four
Xinstretchable
teel cables,
EDERAli GmTires
DOUBLE CABLE BASE
SLOPER BROS. & COCKLE
. ;
MURCH RUSSELL, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon..
Office and residence over Inde-
dependence National Bank
Try the Salem Studio for
PHOTOGRAPHS
884 State Street
ASK CHANGES IN
WAR RISK ACT
"X
Important Amendments in Bill
Are Asked of National
. , Lawmakers.
REVISE SCHEDULE UPWARD
Increased Compensation for Disabled
Ex-Servlce Men Is Urged Bureau
Seeks to Give Fullest Possible
Service to Those Affected.
Washington. "Our work In conduct
ing the affairs of the bureau must 'be
guided by the couusel of the soldiers,
BuIIors and marines themselves. Our
utni Is to be of the fullest possible serv
ice to those affected by the act."
Thus Colonel It. O. Cholmeley-Jones,
director of the bureau of war risk In
surance, In the course of a talk to
wounded soldiers at Walter Reed hos
pital, Washington, D. C, epitomized
the motives behind the action of the
bureau in requesting congress, through
the treasury department, to enact sev
eral Important amendments, to the war
risk Insurance act. These may be di
vided Into two general classes thoso
affecting the compensation features of
the act, and those concerning war
risk Insurance.
A very Important proposed amend
ment, and one which meets with wide
spread approval, Is the upward revi
sion of the schedule of compensation
payable to disabled ex-service men.
Under the present schedule a man to
tally disabled is entitled to $30 a
month. If single. The amendment
raises this by $50, making $S0 pay
able under these circumstances. If he
has a wife but no child living he gets
$45; the amendment provides $l0. If
he has a wife and one child, he draws
at present, $55; the amendmeot gives
him $95.
Extend the Provisions.
The law now provides that If a man
loses both hands, both feet, or the
sight of both eyes, or becomes helpless
and permanently bedridden, he shall
receive $100 a month compensation.
Experience has shown that many men
who have lost an arm and a leg, or one
limb and the sight of one eye, are Just
as badly crippled as men who have
lost both feet or both hands, and so
the bureau has recommended that In
addition to the Injuries at present en
titling a man to compensation at the
rate of $100 a month, the following
shall be Included : The loss of one foot
and one hand ; the loss of one foot and
the sight of one eye. These are deem
ed "total and permanent disability" by
the express wording of the amend
ment. There Is also a provision that
for a "double total permanent disabil
ity," meaning cases in which men are
maimed so seriously that their Injuries
Include two of these classifications, the
compensation shall be $200 a month.
The bureau has found a very wide
spread sentiment among ex-service
men in favor of having their policies
made payable In a lump sum, or In In
stallments covering a short period of
time, at their option. To meet this
demand Director Cholmeley-Jones has
urgently recommended a modification
of the war risk Insurance act to permit
making provision In the contract for
converted insurance for optional set
tlements on the part of the Insured,
making such Insurance payable either
In one sum or In Installments for thirty-six
months or more.
If the insured has not exercised his
right of election, under the proposed
amendment the beneficiary may eleot
to receive the Insurance In monthly
HE CUT RED TAPE
tf ' ;
Installments' covering a period of not
less thnu three years.
; Include Other Relatives.
Another very Important Item Is the
"proposed enlargement of the permitted
class of Insurance beneflclttrles (spouse,
child, grandchild, parent, brother or
sister) to Include, In addition to those
enumerated, uncles, aunts, nephews,
nieces,' brothers-in-law and slsters-ln-lawj
,
All of the amendments described
nboye, together with several other pro
posed measures of less general Inter
est, but of much Importance, are Incor
porated In the so-called "Sweet bill,"
Introduced by Congressman Sweet of
Iowa In the house of representatives
ou August 20, 101!).
The whole trend of the bureau's
recommendations manifest Its desire
to be of the greatest possible service
to those for whom It v. as created the
mod who served our country In the
Great War. Not only In recommending
the adoption of amendatory legislation,
but In every other possible way, the
bureau Is doing its best to expedite
its service, and to carry out the letter
and spirit of the act In behalf of the
men for whom It was prepared.
In the mutter of the settlement of in
surance claims the bureau Is practical
ly current. Of over 123,000 claims, nil
but 9,000 have been settled, and repu
lar payments are being made. The
9.000 unsettled cases consist of those
in which tho beneficiaries live In for
eign countries or for some other rea
son cannot be reached. A diligent 't
fort Is being made to get In touch with
this comparatively small residue.
Insurance Paid Promptly.
A great many people do not reallz
that there Is a wide difference between
the Insurance feature of the act and
the provision for compensation. An
Insurance claim Is paid Immediately
tc the beneficiary, but In tho case of a
claim for compensation a great many
features must, under the law, be con
sidered, such as the members of tho
family within the permitted class, tho
extent of their dependency, and tho
extent of the soldier's disability. ThU
accounts for the fact that claims for
compensation have not been settled as
promptly as Insurance claims. The
compensation and claims division of
the bureau Is bending every effort to
determine these cases as quickly as
thorough and -intelligent handling will
permit. A large staJY of examiners Is
working night and day In making com
pensation awards.
The medical division lias just com
pleted a very trying nnd dllllcult tnsk
the preparation of a schedule of dis
ability ratings for different Injuries
and combinations of injuries, based on
$100 per month as compensation for to
tal disability. If the Sweet bill (H. It.
8778) becomes law, all compensation
for disability will be based upon $100
per month as a maximum Instead of
upon $30 as at present. This schedule
Is necessarily very complicated, being
designed to cover all probable combina
tions and degrees of injuries, and
must be revised from time to time In
accordance with the bureau's experi
ence in order that full Justice may be
done In all, cases.
"Unquestionably, the government In
surance contracts will be constantly
Improved, as experience Indicates the
need for Improvements, and It Is de
cidedly to the advantage of. all of us
to hold the maximum amount of this
government Insurance," adds the di
rector. ,
Reinstatement of Insurance.
"A recent treasury decision has auth
orized the reinstatement of govern
ment Insurance within 18 months after
discharge by the payment of only two
OLDEST AND YOUNGEST IN HARVARD
It' t ' r i " (A &2
SX&ifMZ ft I
iVif fAWR' H' II
Col. George Lyon, seventy-one years of age, is Harvard university's oldest
student this year. He graduated In 1879, but has re-entered for a course In
public speaking. Jacob Shankman of Chelsea, thirteen years old, la the
youngest student. He is also attending the Hebrew Rabbinical college.
J
Col. Kdwln Jadwtn, now In command
of one of the engineer regiments lu
France, disregarded war department
red tape, formalities and regulations,
to get his troops over to France fully
equipped for work. The record made
by Colonel Judwln In getting bis men
speedily ready for service and the fill
clency of his work has already been
tho subject of widespread comment In
itrmy circles. It develops now that tho
reason for bis success was primarily
due to tho fact that he Ignored red
tape Incumbrances which are required
legally by the present system. It will
be for Secretary linker to d'cM.
whether Col. Judwln U to cscnpu the
remonstrance that attaches to his
course or whether he will bo com
mended for his Initiative und his success.
months premiums on the amount of In
surance to ho reinstated, oho covering
the month of grace during which the
policy was In force, and one for the
month In which reinstatement Is made.
Tills Is a very generous provision, nnd
will make it possible for all ex-servicemen
to retain their government Insur
ance after they have become adjusted
again in their normal civil life. Indeed.
I look for a very heavy reinstatement
and conversion as soon as the Sweet
bill passes the senate and becomes an
act and It Is made known to all thoso
who are affected.
"The bureau appreciates tremendous
ly the co-operation It has had from
the Insurance oH'icials nnd the men of
tho Insurance profession, ami It Is to
be regretted that there are some few
who disregarded their moral obligation
to assist the ex-service men by encour
aging the men to drop their govern
ment Insurance und take out Insurance
In private companies. It Is my per
sonal opinion that all ex-service men
in such instances should combine in
their disapproval of such action, and
should In some forceful way express
their utter disgust for those who are
found guilty of such practices. Indeed,
In the yenrs to come, I feel confident
that, hi such cases where ex-service
men have been advised in such way as
to allow them to lose their government
insurance, that there will bo at least
one man In the world whom the ex
scrvloo men will utterly despise, and
distrust, and that will he the un
scrupulous agent who In a time of test
was found wanting."
The G-E Range :
Saves Food"' L,
The i. comparison shown
here h not mere theory
it is bused on nctiml tests.
Figure this &aviiitf out in
money nt present ri(T9ot
moat. See wlmt Jt mown
to your pocket-book.
Ccxvltn)
liloctricity
D1
m JIGl
Ml
4 7 lbs Ooz.
: )
r - I, p ... i ! t
ill
CocluHibii?
i n i . I
7
MOUNTAIN STATES
POWER COMPANY
ii m
ill-'.i '
THE REASON WHY
Money i More Safe in
NATIONAL BANKS
"OVER 21 BILLION
RESOURCES"
(Each Under Supervi
sion of U. S Gov'nt
Of all the idneesi there nre to
Pepoait, HUle, nml Invent our
Money her U H'c reason
"Why" wo tihouhl prefer a
National Jinny.
THE INDEPENDENDENCE NATIONAL BANK. .
This Bank is Under Superviiion of United States
Government.
BRITISH BIRTH i RATE GPOWS
More Boys Are Born in Times of Hard
ships, Official Figures
, Show. .
Iondon. More babies were born In
England during Augu.st than In any
previous month since the beginning of
the war. Ofllclnl returns show tho
numher to be 6,390, equivalent to an
annual rate of 18 per 1,000, and 401
more babies than in the same month
of -1918.
, "I believe that during and after wars
more bny babies nre born than girls,"
said Dr. Mnry Scharlleb, a specialist,
discussing the report. "I think olllcinl
figures will proVe that more boys are
born during periods of .tress, hard
ship and food shortages and more elf's
during periods of wealth, ease and
luxury."
"A baby these days Is a very ex
pensive addition to the average Rrlt
IbIi family," said another doctor. "The
cost of everything, from blankets to
perambulators has practically doubled.
Milk is a shilling a quart nnd nurses
three guineas a week. - The infant's
extensive wardrobe is nlso a costly af
fair these' days, while his cot costs
twice as much as before the war. Only,
millionaires can afford twins, much as
we need them to repair the waste of
A Grocery That Never
Disappoints Customers
Groceries
f ChaaRSStTV) Not 'Best Because Bififiist'
"'' in-ivT-fei ) But Biggest' Because Best
LargeQuanJn?5
No Order Too Large To Fill
No Order Too Small To Fill
This Store Aims to Servo the Tublic Pleasantly and Well The
Goods We Sell are Just as Represented and When Drders are Given
We NEVER DUPLICATE. We Send You Just What You Order,
Never Send tho "Just aa Good" Kind.
Calbreath & Jones
war.
r
Strang Fish.
Venice, Cul. A strange fish, approx
imately nine feet In length and consist
ing mostly of mouth, head and toll, Is
arousing much Interest bore. The
freak monster was found on the beach
by Frank Benedict, a city official. In
the mouth of the fish were four rows
of teeth. The eyes are as large as
saucers. The creature resembles a
gigantic tadpole.
DO YOU READ
THE ENTERPRISE?
The Leading and Largest newspaper in
Independence as well as' most widly read