Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, December 31, 1915, Image 1

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(THE HOME PAPER)
DALLAS, FOLK COUNTY. OREGON. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1915.
(TWIOE-A-WEEK)
KO. ?7
;r better job
RIGKREALL P.O. ROBBED HOTEL GAIL CHANGES
HAS PROMINENT PLACE
BUDGET GETS APPROVAL
DALLAS NOT TO SUFFER
KES TO POSITION AT
LTURAL COLLEGE.
THIEVES ENTER LUCAS PRICE MR. THOMPSON, FORMEE OPER-
POLK CONSPICUOUS IN FARM
TAXPAYERS ENDORSE WORK
PREPARATIONS FOR DRY DAYS
HAVE BEEN MADE.
STORE IN UNKNOWN WAY. ATOR, BECOMES OWNER. ,
EES' WEEK PROGRAM.
OF THE COUNTY COURT.
lerintendency of Polk Book Containing Stamps Carried
Henry Sen Leaves Dallas to Seek
Higher Altitude for Benefit of
Mrs. Serr't Health.
Stockmen and Dairymen Will Discuss
Proposed Levy of Twenty Mills Re
Shipments of Intoxicants Into Baili
wick Numerous During Last Days
of Dying Year.
ILfter Four Yean of
irked Success.
Away Gold Watch Stolen From
Leading Questions at Coming
Corvallis Meet.
mains Unaltered Voting Pre
cincts Are Changed..
Eakin Home.
Seymour, superintendent
ty schools, has been elect
ard of regents of the Ore
tural college to succeed
Griffin as state leaden
& girls' club work, under
.1 of the extension depart-
i college. Prof. Griffin has
. a similar position with the
1 (" apartment of Cornell Uni
' it l.hica, N. Y., and is expectt-
i ,va for that institution eariy
t. y, when Mr. Seymour will
t duties at the 0. A. C.
s three terms as county
nt, with headquarters in
Seymour has won not only
t national distinction as
f school work, and under
Polk county schools have
arful progress. Especially
Ork in connection wilth
trial club work become
gnized, and the federal
Jucation was not the last
s excellence. As county
nt of schools, Mr. Sey
been a diligent worker,
tie greatest energy and
me at his duties. His ideas
d work have combined to
'oik county school system
icle upon which it rests to
g spent most of his life in
: Dallas and in that time
iany hundreds of friends,
rough his personality, but
sneral appreciation of his
las been an advocate and
.' the home credit plan that
a successfully worked in
ts of the county, and be
t about a marked improve-
,ie teaching force of the
n the boys' and girls' club
Seymour's efforts were re-
it a great extent tor the
f the school department of
- fair, and for the winning
ors at the state fair,
recognition of these many
lalities, as well as in ap
of t'he man himself, that
W has been selected to the
position with the agncul-
9. lit is a position requir
adaptability and special
and these the college
r. Seymour better than in
person. His selection was
n the part of the board of
here were several other ap-
' the place. He is to work
ider Prof. R. I). Hetzel,
extension department, bull
11 be distinct from that of
xtension workers. He will
ati ox assistants, lamong
two well-known in Dallas
equent visits, Miss Helen
1 Leonard J. Allen. Mr.
served (t hree terms as su
t of Polk county schools
prith genuine regret that
f people see him leave,
ty court is in a quandary
ipointment. of a successor,
robably bring the matter
ttlementj at the January
the court. There are nu
Hcants, both among repub-democrats-
Absolutely no
8 been made upon any one
n fast, several women ap
ve been given preliminary
Mi by the court. There are
men or women eligible to
a and qualified to hold t.
requiring great energy and
as well as education and
wig the men whose names
mentioned are H. H. Par-
l school supervisor, B. A.
odependence, H. L. Keezcl
rth, Mr. Johnson of McCoy
ford, among republicans,
ley is an avowed democrat
tit. Mr. Crowley had al
ared himself a candidate
mination at the democratic
next spring.
The Rickreall postoffice, located in
the Lucas & Price store, was entered
by thieves on Tuesday night, or early
Wednesday morning, and tyw or $;u
in stomps taken. The theft was dis
covered by the proprietors when they
opened the store on Wednesday, and
in the meantime the robbers had so
well covered their tracks t hat no trace
of them has been found. Although
much of value was handy in the store
those who broke in did not molest
anything with the exception of the
stamps, which were in a large book.
The key to the registered mail bags
was within reach of anyone in the of
fice and . the registered mail sacks
contained approximately $100 in mon
ey and orders. The stock or tills in
the store of Lucas & Price were .un
touched, the thieves evidently being
satisfied with the haul they made on
the stamps. Wednesday morning the
cover to the large stamp book was
found on the Nesnuth place near
Riclcreall, where the robbers had dis
carded it after tearing out its con
sents. Sheriff Orr went to Rickreall early
on Wednesday to investigate the rob
bery, but found no clew of value in
his search for the culprits. The doors
of ithe store were all securely fasten
ed when the place was opened by the
'proprietors ithe morning after Itlhe
robbery, and it is a mystery how the
thieves gained entrance unless tney
had pass keys, and were well ac
quainted with the store. Several Rick
reall people are sure that the robbery
was committed by two men who pass
ed along the road toward Dallas
about eleven o'clock Tuesday night.
The finding of the stamp book coven
indicated the route they took in mak
ing their escape.
It may possibly have been the same
person, or persons, who entered the
postoffice, who later entered Horfc C.
Eakin 's home the same evening and
took Mrs. Eakin 's purse containing a
valuable watch and some money. This
theft was not discovered until late
Wednesday morning, and it is attrib
utted to the earae thieves as those who
entered the postoffice. Nothing In
the Eakin house was disturbed with
the exception of the writing desk,
whOTe Mrs. fcakin's purse was. Mr.
Eakin 'a sister heard unusual noises
in the early hours of the moraine,
but attributed them rather to the
wind than to robbers. The watch,
which Mrs. Eakin valued greatly, had
her full name engraved on the inner
back case and would be very hard to
dispose of dishonestly on that ac
count.
HIGH SCHOOL TEAM WINS.
; ARE MADE HAPPY.
ice People Provide Food
Jiothinj, at Christmas.
pen purses and willing
people of Independence ral
ristma time to the support
a need. More than (120 in
ell as-donations of clothing,
i potatoes were provided,
lilies supplied. Committees
i these families previously,
lined hat was most needed
Christmas comfortable and
Chen filling the orders, the
rere not forgotten, and a
: of eandy and But and a
for each child in the fam
;luded. .
Student Basketball Flayers Clean Up
at Smithfield.
The Dallas high school basketball
team showed a fast team of Smitht-
Jfield' youths the rudiments of the
game on Wednesday evening when it
defeated them on their own floor by a
score of 48 to 9. Both teams played
good basketball throughout the game,
bust coaching and practice and know
ledge ot the game were i favor 01 the
Dallas beys and they went on the floor
like a whirlwind, taking everything
in their rushes. For Dallas Ray Scott
was the chief point winner, and to his
credit are marked 11 Held baskets and
(two free throws, or just half of the
total number of points scored. Floyd
Ellis' made five field goals, four of
which were in the last period of play.
At the end of the first period the score
was 20 to 6, and in the second period
Dallas made 28 points while the
Smithfield team could only score a
single goal. For Dallas the game was
played by Cutler, Bennett, Scott,
Hart, Ellis and Berg. For Smithfield
the following five played the entire
game: Diehm, Myers, McCrow, Trent
and Zumwalt. The next game on the
schedule of the local team is that at
Silverton with the high school of that
city on Saturday evening, January L
Thrown From Buggy.
While returning home from a neigh
bor's on Christmas dav, Mrs. E. 1 .
Rogers of the Oakdale district was
thrown from the buggy in which she
was riding alone at the time, but es
caped serious injury. Mr. Kogers had
left her with the rig while be opened
m gate when the horse made a quick
start, overturning the bnggy and
throwing its occupant to the ground.
One wheel of the vehicle passed over
ber body, but it being light her in
jury was slight
Show Give Promise.
The Marion County Poultry associ
ation b offering much greater cash
inducements, than ever before, to tie
poultry fancier to exhibit some of
After a successful career of nearly
four years under the capable manage
ment of Henry Serr Wie uau noiei nas
been purchased by its former and
original proprietors, Mr. and Mr.
J. B. Thompson of Albany, owners of
the building. Mr. and Mrs. Thomp
son operated the Gail for eleven years,
and under their management tne nos
telry gained widespread fame among
(travelers and among! local paopjiei
Three and a half years ago the
Thompsons sold to Henry Serr, who
has continued to run the business
along the lines set down during the
Thompson ownership. Some years
ago Mr. Thompson built a brick an
nex to the hotel and equipped tnat
part in a thoroughly modern way,
making the hotel one of the best ui
the valley. It has outlived several
other establishments in the city and
enjoys the majority of the first class
trade that comes into the city.
Mr. Serr has been successful in
the management of the hotel ana
leaves only because of his wife's
health. The family will leave here
early next week for Spokane, where
the several members thereof will en-,
joy a well-earned rest until Mr. Serr
locates in a similar business in some
of the inland towns, where a higher
altitude will benefit his wife. Mr.
Serr enjoys Wie close friendship of
every Itnavehng man who makes lal
las and this trade is an important
item to the Gail. He expects to en
ter the hotel business somewhere in
Idaho when he finds the proper loca
tion. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson havo been
living in Albany since they sold to
Mr. Serr, and there are heavily in
terested in the Hotel Albany. Under
ithe new management the Gail will be
operated as it was when Mr, Thomp
son was in charge before. No ex
tensive improvements are planned for
the immediate future, but Mr. Thomp
son has in mind several things which
will he changed when the proper tiina
comes. He was an active factor in
the civic and commercial life of the
city when he had the hotel before,
and in this Mr. Serr has been like
him, closely identified with the wonk
of the Commercial club, and commer
cial and civic undertakings. Mr. and
Mrs. Thompson are spending today
at Portland and will assume charge
of the hotel tomorrow morning, start
ing the new month and year.
SPAN PLANS ARE SORTED.
0 19 Submitted for Salem Bridge,
Only Few Are Considered:
All except five of the nineteen plans
submitted for the proposed Marion-
Polk county Willamette river bridge
at Salem were eliminated from con
sideration on Tuesday by the board
of viewers and the state highwf y de
partment, because they did not con
form to the specifications imposed by
the state highway department. From
the five plans left the viewers will
recommend the two deemed best. The
courts of the two counties will then
select the type desired.
McMinnville Citizen Dead.
At the age of 70 years, Royal G ro
ver, one of the best-known McMinn
ville citizens, passed away. He is sur
vived by his widow and the following
children: Mrs. Mande Kirk of Rose
burg; Mrs. H. L. Toney of McMinn
ville; Principal Carl Grover of Oren
co, and Professor Isabel Grover of
McMinnville college. The funeral was
held Wednesday.
' Farmers' week at the O. A. C, be
ginning on Monday morning, will be
one of especial interest to Polk coun
ty residents because of the fact that
so many Polk county people will be
speakers at the various meetings and
conferences to be held during the
week. On Monday J. Waldo Finn,
county roadmaster, will deliver a thir
ty minute talk on "Oiling Roads,
Methods and Costs." This is to be in
connection with the Road Builders'
conference. On Tuesday, January 4,
"Leading Guernsey Families of
America," will be the subject used by
Mr. Chase of Independence before a
meeting of the Guernsey Breeders' as
sociation. On the same day the Ore
gon Jersey Cattle club will meet at
tne college and one of the subjects
discussed will be "Raising the Jersey
Heifer." Guy Hewett of Monmouth
will lead the discussion of that sub
ject.! Wednesday will be given over
to various meetings, among the most
important of which will be the. con
ference of the State Dairy association.
Mrs. F. E. Lynn of Perrydale is ad
dressing that gathering on the sub
ject of "The Dairy Farmer's Home."
At the same meeting Frank Loughary
of Monmouth, president of the Polk
County Cow Testing association, will
deliver a five-minute talk. A confer
ence of officials of county fail's of
the Btate will be held on Wednesday
and a number of Polk county people
win oe present, a. u. oeymoutr, coun
ty superintendent of schools, will ad
dress the meeting on "School Indus
trial Exhibits," a subject with which
he is very familiar, as shown by his
work Here. " Women s Work in Con
nection wimi tne county fair, is
the subject that has been assigned to
Mrs. Winnie Jiraden tor treatment.
Farmers ' week will be a busy one for
all who are present at the agricul
tural college, and a number or rolk
county people in addition to those on
the program will attend. There will
be evening social features for the
pleasure of the hundreds of farmers
and. othejs, who will, be in Con cllis,
and the business meetings of the var
ious organizations will be another in
teresting feature.
POLK COUNTY IS FINANCIER.
November Payments From County
Treasury Amount to ? 82,295.62.
Polk county deals in sums of money
each month 111 the transaction ot rou
tine business that would seem to in
dicate high finance. For the month
of November County Treasurer Hoi
man's report is interesting in this
connection.' During that month 82,-
295.62 were paid out of his office.
The largest part of this was in pay
ment of warrants called in, amount
ing to $31,750.35. In addition to
that heavy expenditure the last halt
of the state tax was paid, amounting
to $28,000.04. Other expenditures thut
helped moke the total a large one
were: General fund, $5,025.58; gen
eral road lund, fl4V!l; common
school fund; $5,703.75; high school
fund, $849.12; special school tund,
$7862.78, and special city fund, fi,-956.79.
Fruit Growers to Meet. .
The Polk County Fruit Growers'
association will convene on Saturday,
January 8, for the purpose of elect
ing officers for the coming year and
for the transaction of such other bus
iness as may come before the meeting.
President Eakin is desirous that there
be a full attendance on this occasion.
lawley Attends Meeting.
awley of McCoy, represent
Jregon" Purebred Livestock
a. has been attending the their poultry at tbe show to be held
f the Oregon Irrigation eon
Portland this week. Irriga
rom all parts of the state
as far away at Texas have
esioa wit the congress in
from January 11 to the 14th, inela-
nve. This will be the only winter
show held in the Willamette valley
this season and will therefore draw
from a maea greater territory than
ever before.
GOOD BYE, OLD YEAR.
GOODBY, OLD YEAR, GO0DBY!
YOU HAVE BROUGHT MUCH PAIN AND SADNESS;
YOU HAVE BROUGHT MUCH JOY AND GLADNESS.
MANY A PATHWAY YOU HAVE BRIGHTENED;
MANY A SOREOW YOU HAVE LIGHTENED.
GOODBY, OLD YEAR, GOODBY I
COME IN, NEW YEAR, COME INI
WE ARE MUCH REJOICED TO MEET YOU.
WITH WORDS OF WELCOME WE DO GREET YOU.
FOR YOU THE MIDNIGHT BELLS ARE RINGING;
FOE YOU THE CHORISTERS ARB SINGING.
COME IN, NEW YEAR, COME INI
. COME IN, NEW YEAR, COME INI
LIGHTEN THE FOOTSTEP IN THE FURROW;
SOFTEN EVERY PANG Or SORROW;
SOOTHE THE BROW THAT IS EVER ACHING;
COMFORT THE HEAET THAT WITH PAIN IS BREAKING.
COME IN, NEW YEAR, COME IN!
Without a single change and by
practically unanimous vote the assem
blage ot taxpayers at the public bud
get hearing yesterday adopted the
1916 budget as prepared by the coun
ty court. There was a large number
ot prominent 1 01k county people at
the meeting, and the discussion enter
ed into was to the point and effective.
Contrary to many expressed predic
tions the meeting did not cut the
county fair appropriation. The var
ious items on the budget were taken
separately and studied, but the levy
of 20 mills remained unaltered after
a session lasting throughout most of
the day.
Several matters of importance to
voters in several parts of the county
were brought to the attention of the
meeting. A new voting precinct was
created in the Rock Creek district by
cutting off the major portion, includ
ing all the west end of the Pedee pre
cinct. The new precinct is larger, as
it was created than the Pedee pre-
cmot, which was formerly one or the
largest in the county. Some of the
prominent voters in the new district
are H. Lt. Hayes, Frank Heyden, Joe
Sampson, E. Wright, J. L. Chamber
lain and t . L. Fatland.
The County Boundary board, con
sisting of tbe county court and the
school superintendent, reviewed Ithe
special school tax levy of the Black
Rook district from five mills to three
mills. A petition asking for the re
view was presented by C. L. Starr,
representing timber interests in the
district, while the district itself was
(represented by Mr. Ross of the school
board. The reduction was caused be
cause the school board computed its
tax levy on a lower assessed valua
tion than that shown by the tax as
sessment rolls.
Among those who attended the pub
lic hearing were : Senator C. L. Haw-
ley of McCoy, I. L. Patterson and
Frank Gibson of Eola, C. A. Park of
Salem, J. Imlah of West Salem, J.
K. Sears of McCoy, S. L. McElmurray
of Independence, L M. Simpson of
Airlie, H. M. hdgar and Jesse Wil
liamson of Crowley, A. R. Southwich
of West Salem, A. Lrvuigtoree of
West Salem, C. L. Starr ot Portland,
G. W. Gibson .and Charles Pierce of
West Salem.
MASS MEETING NEXT SUNDAY.
The Other Side of Sunday Laws to
Be Argued by Wm. Healey.
The anti side of the Sunday clos
ing law will be discussed at a general
mass meeting on Sunday afternoon at
the Grand theater by the Hon. Wil
liam Mayhew Healey, an authority on
that particular subject. A wave of
so-called reform is sweeping the coun
try and the lid is constantly being
clamped tighter on Sunday activities
of any kind. There are innumerable
arguments pro and con, but the ma
jority of those presented are in fa
vor of closing everything on Sunday.
Mr. Healey and those Who are asso
ciated with him in the anti-Sunday
law movement have different ideas on
the subject and his presentation at
the Sunday mass meeting will be in
teresting. Some of the question, he
will deal with and attempt to answer
satisfactorily are: Are Sunday Laws
Religious f Who Made the First Sun
day LawT Civil Rest Day Law Ex
ploded. Shall Majorities Rule in !!e
ligious Matters t The meeting will be
open and free to the public.
MR. SOEHREN WOULD RESIGN.
COME IN. NEW YEAR, COME INI
DEAL GENTLY WITH THOSE THAT WANDER
FROM THE FOLD OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD.
WITH THE BEEAD OF LIFE, OH, FEED THEM,
AND IN THE LIGHT, OH, KINDLY LEAD THEM!
COME IK, NEW YEAR, COME INI
V
Believes Fair Management Should B
Vested in Farmers.
Giving as his reason that the coun
ty fair should be under the manage
ment of the farmers of the county,
Mr. Soehren has declared that be will
tender his resignation as president of
the fair board, and uus being toe
case there is a vacancy to fill. Who
will be elected to succeed to the pres
idency has not been discussed by the
other members of the board, but if
it is the wish of Mr. Soehren that our
rural neighbors hare tbe management
of this institution, and resigns with
this end in view, it would be only
fair to him to elect bis successor from
among the farmer member of tbe di
Postoffice Inspector Here.
C. W. Linebangh, United States
posioffiee inspector, was in Dallas yes
terday in connection with the Rick
reall postoffice robbery. Mr. Line
bangh found nothing that will mater
ially aid in finding the culprits, but
has subject matter for a -complete re
port to the government.
Brophy Will Probated.
The will of the hue H. B. Brophy,
who aeeidentiy shot and killed him
self in West Salem early in j the
month, has been admitted to probate
in Marion county. The estate is val
ued at (16,500, and eoasuU efaiesly
at real estate.
By means both fair and foul The
Observer has compiled the approxi
mate total of intoxicating liquors
shipped into Dallas Bince the first day
of December. And the total is as
tounding to those who had a belief
that the city, as well as the remain
der of the state, would be tee-totally
dry beginning with the first of the
new year. Perhaps never during the
palmy days of the saloon in Dallas
was so much liquor consigned to the
'city as 'has been shipped in this1
month. Throughout the state cellars
are taking on a hospitable appearance
with the approaching dry days. In
fact today is the last on which in
toxicants in various forms can be re
ceived without the prescribed permit,
and from the figures here presented it
is not at all likely that County Clerk
Robinson will be called upon to issue
a permit in Dallas for some time. A
significant fact put forth by a metro
politan contemporary, and borne out
in the case of Dallas people, is that
the "tipplers," the habitual drink
ers, and those who go miles out of
their way to patronize a saloon, are
not those to whom liquors are con
signed. The shipments coming into
Dallas from Portland, Independence,
and other wet towns, in addition to
northern California points, are deliv
ered in a majority of cases to people
who have not been known to even
take their "morning's morning," on
"evening's evening." They are the
folks who staunchly supported prohi
bition, and who shunned even the
thought of having intoxicants in their
homes. They are the class that will
be but lightly affected by the enforce
ment of the prohibition measure;
those who did not want liquor enough
to warrant the saloon evil, but who,
now that the saloon is singing the
last sad notes of its swan' song, sea
that their homes must be as oases in
the desert of prohibition and are
stocking up their buffets and basement
lockers. Wholesale liquor dealers, es
pecially those of Portland, have done
a land-office business in Dallas with
in the past month, but tonight at 12 :
30 o'clock the crape of prohibition
will be tied to the door knob, heavy
shipments .will cease and when the
available supply is used the shipment
of 24 quarts of beer and 2 quarts of
whisky or vinous liquors to each four
weeks will start.
But getting down to figures in the
matter of liquor shipment to the
"dry" city of Dallas, we find that
through two. sources, and not includ
ing the great amount of "booze" that
has been brought into the city in suit
cases and packages from Falls City
and Independence, there have been .'
delivered to Dallas people, during the -
month of December alone, approxi
mately 47 barrels and 25 cases of
beer, or, roughly figured, 3580 quarts,
enough that a quart of beer could be
allowed almost every man, woman and
child in the city. During the same
penod barrels, 11 kegs, 4 cases and
318 quarts of whisky have been de
livered to Dallas people, in addition
to what has been carried in. r lguring
roughly again it may be seen that tie
total amount of whisky shipped into
Dallas in the monph of December
would allow a full quart to 2185 peo- .
pie. Not only has whisky and beer
been shipped in large quantities, but
wines have been popular. Of different
kinds of wine Dallas people have re
ceived 1 barrel, 5 kegs and 8 cases
in December, or the approximate
equivalent of 980 quarts. In addition
to beer, whisky and wins the ship
ment of 1 keg of gin and 2 kegs of
alcohol has been recorded. It is, in
view of these figures, not difficult to
estimate that during the month just
closing there were delivered to Dallas
people almost 7200 quarts of liquor.
These figures do not include all that
came in yesterday or any of to-day
consignments.
Verily the new year will be a wet
one.
FREIGHT TRAIN IS DITCHED.
Shipments Into Dallas Delayed by Ao
ddent Near Oregon City.
The regular daily freight shipment
from Portland to Dallas was delayed
yesterday because train number 221
went into the ditch between Oregon
City and Pulp, a station just beyond
Oregon City. Tbe derailment delayed
the freight into Dallas nearly an en
tire day aa the ear did not arrive un
til late in tbe evening, when it was
dns early yesterday morning. Train
221 brings tbe daily freight shipments
down the main line, and at Whiteson
leaves Dallas ears for the local train
to pick up. The derailment resulted
in no aerioos damage.
1 Retnxm From California,
Ed. Jaeobson and family returned
yesterday morning from California,
whither they went several months ars
to reside permanently, and will agaia
take up their rem deuce in Dallas.
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