Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, November 09, 1915, Image 5

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    THE POLE COUNTY OBSERVER, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1915.
TELL HOW THEY DID IT
PRIZE-WINNING WORKERS ARE
ENTHUSIASTS.
Folk County Students Making Pro
nounced Successes of Their Sev
eral Undertakings.
That school industrial -work is eaiii
ing greatly throughout the state, and
that .Folk county leads all others in
this particular, is acknowledged by
all persons interested in this branch
of educational work. And the Oregon
way of doing things is meeting with
the approval of educators of other
states, a statement proven by the in-
. terest maluxested in the industrial
display from this state at the Pana
ma exposition. The public press has
devoted much space to the work, evi
dently believing it worth while. The
Sunday Oregonian this week had a
full page pertaining thereto, in which
is included the following about Polk
county workers:
Girl Wins Poultry Prize.
Hazel Bursell of Monmouth was
one of the poultry club winners last
year who came back and won the
first prize in the state contest again
this year. In addition to making more
than $35 net profit from her small
flock, she won a grand prize offered
by the Hicks-Chatten Engraving com
pany, Portland, Oregon, for the best
record made in egg production by
poultry club members. MisB Bursell
tells the secret of her success as fol
lows:
"The object of this work is to show
the value and importance of the pom
try industry, and the marketing of
only first-class, unitorm products and
to teach us how to take better care
of our flocks, which means more and
better eggs, better hatches, more and
better chicks and incidentally better
boys and girls.
"In 1913 I won one and bought an
other setting of White Wyandotte
ecrtrs from Archie McLauley of Tort-
land, who had the best chickens in the
juvenile work at the 1912 state fair,
winning thereby a Shetland pony
This boy is making all his own college
money "right in the city of Portland,
at the same time attending high
school. I raised all the chicks from
these two settings excepting one, and
it fell in a post hole and died before
I found it. The next year I raised
another nice bunch of chicks and this
year am raising more .chicks for next
year. There are always a few Brown
Leghorns at the house, as they are
about the hardest .fowl to keep where
one wants them, and I use them in
my club work also. My folks have
raised pure-bred Brown Leghorns for
16 years, and we have some splendid
layers. We get a dozen or so eggs
when many people.do not get a single
one. Ours do not have very good care
either.
"Durins January and February I
fed my chickens wheat at night and
oats one morning and oat screenings
the next. My chickens like the screen
ings better than the large oats. I fed
my chickens between 6:30 and 7 in
the morning, but in the evening it was
necessary to feed them at different
times during the six months because
of the different times at which it oe
gaii to get dark. During March, April
and May I fed oats in the morning
and wheat at night, with a potato
peeling mash at noon in March and
April, but in May I did not think they
needed it. In June oats predominat
ed in my rations. In the latter part
of June I fed a mash of milk, bran
and shorts. I fed drv bran and shorts,
also erit and shell in a hopper. I
kent mv 'train in a barrel so that
chickens could not tear the sacks and
spill the grain, and also some few
chickens would get too much to eat.
I measured all grains, etc., in a quart
measure, for I knew just how much a
quart of each variety of grain, bran
or shorts weighed, and kept it in the
grain barrel. I cleaned the houses on
Saturday, also put in clean litter,
cleaned nests, etc.
"My method of managing disease
is by applying the old proverb, 'An
ounce of prevention is worth a pound
of cure,' and. by applying a 'stitch
in time saves nine,' and a few simple
remedies. I do not have any trouble
not pay as much in cash as the stores
do in trade and was more trouble for
us to take them there, so after that
I sold most of them at the Dallas
grocery stores, using some at home
and using and selling some for sib
ting purposes. I have not had White
Wyandottes long, so do not sell many
sittings of eggs, but each year I sell
more."
Dallas Boy Wins Prize.
L. M. Bowles of Dallas specialized
in seed oats and won the grand prize
dffered by J. N. Teal, chairman Ore
gon Conservation commission, for the
best record made in the seed grain
production project, Mr. Bowles tells
how he raised his crop as follows
"The land on which my oats were
praised had been set to strawberries
and plowed about March 1. The soil
is a clay loam. It has been used as
a garden for years. It has been heav
ily manured several times. The ground
was plowed about March 1 to a depth
of seven inches. Three weeks after
plowjng it was cultivated twice with
a rolling harrow. After this the
ground was not cultivated until about
April 1, when it was harrowed with a
heavy harrow, commony called a gc-
devil. Atter this, about April I, it
was cultivated twice with a spring-
tooth harrow. Then came a thorough
harrowing with the go-"devil. '
"The name of the oats which
planted is Corn Belt No. 5. Last
spring (1914) I sent to the Garton-
Cooper Seed company of Sugar Grove',
111., for one-half pound of seed. This
seed I planted and saved the seed
from it for 1915. The Corn Belt oat
is supposed to be a cross between the
Swedish Select and the Senator. The
kernel is of medium length, plump and
with a moderate hull. Before plant
ing I soaked the seed in a solution of
40 parts water to one part iormalin.
I planted the seed April 14. X don t
know the weight of the seed planted.
In sowing I made a row about six
inches wide and two inches deep with
wheel hoe. I then scattered the
seed in the row by hand. I tried to
sow at the rate of three , bushels to
the acre. After scattering the seed in
the row I covered it with a hand rake.
After this the ground received no cul
tivation. 1
"On August 10 I cut the grain with
a hand sickle. I then tied it up with
binding twine in bundles the size of
binder bundles. I then set the bun
dles ud to dry. The grain was all
hard when I cut it. It was ripe sev
eral days before 'I had, time to cut
it. On August 17 1 had the grain
hauled to the threshing machine for
threshine.
I had tour rows tub teet long and
six inches wide and one row 52 feet
long and six inches wide. The length
of the rows is 542 feet. Reduced to
nches, this, makes 6504 inches by six
inches. This makes 39,024 square
inches. Dividing this by 144-271
square feet, the 271 square feet yield
ed by weight 44 pounds of clean oats.
This would make 7084 pounds of oats
to the acre, or 221 bushels to the acre.
This yield seems too large to be true.
"I am computing the cost and prof
it on an acre of ground! at wages that
are paid in this vicinity. I have not
sold my oats, as I want to keep them
for seed. Our local warehouse lis
paying 32 cents a bushel for oats at
present (September IS)."
Starts Right as Dairyman.
Earl R. Cooley of Independence is
a Polk county boy who is getting
started right in the .dairy business.
His milk, feed and butterfat records
on the cows in his father s herd won
him the grand prize offered by C. C.
Colt, president of the Union Meat
company. Portland.
1 first got interested m dairy
herd record keeping' when Professor
W. A. Barr ot the Oregon Agricul
tural college, came to Bethel school
and explained to us about the record
keeping, he writes. He also explain
ed Babcock testing. "I entered for
the record-keeping project.
"We have two different breeds of
dairy cows, registered Ayrshires and
grade Jerseys. We have found a great
deal of difference between the two
breeds. The Ayrshires are hardy eat
ers and will eat what you give them,
while the Jersey will mince away and
look for something a little better. The
Ayrshire is more of a rustler. They
will browse from trees and bushes
and are always hunting for something
to eat, while the Jerseys will be up to
the gate waiting to get rsto the barn
AUTO SMASHES BUGGY
BERT NEWMAN BADLY DAMAG
ED IN MAIN ST. COLLISION.
Driver of Auto Says Rain on Wind
shield Responsible for Sunday
. ; Smashup Youth Injured.
Eleven stitches were necessary to
patch up, the injuries sustained by
Bert Newman, a Salt Creek youth, on
Sunday evening when an automobile
driven by Thomas Roberts of Salem
collided with Newman's rig. The ac
cident occurred on Main street, imme
diately in front of Brown's earaee.
'about eight-thirlty Sunday ievening1,
Newman was coming into the city
from Salt Creek and Roberts, with
friends, was returning to Salem. The
latter say's that rain on the wind
shield of his automobile obscured his
vision and that he did not see the
approaching vehicle. Newman and
a companion were thrown from their
buggy, which was practically demol
ished, and Newman's forehead was
so severely cut that Dr. Bollman had
to make eight stitches. The young
man's upper lip was cut and three
stitches were made to rpeair the in
jury. In addition to the cuts New
man's face was terribly bruised. His
companion in the buggy was injured
internally and was confined to his
bed for some time after the smashup.
The automobile and its occupants es
caped with no more serious damage
than the destruction of the headlights
of the machine.
When Roberts realized what had
occurred he took the injured man, to
Brown's garage and called a doctor.
He has offered to settle the bills in
cident to the accident and yesterday
morning sent his car to Salt. Creek to
bring the injured man to town, where
his wounds could be redressed. 1
S5 FOR A I1AT.1E
In other words, five dollars in your
choice of merchandise from the stocks
of the Crlder store, formerly the Dal
las Mercantile company, for a mo
ment s thought on the subject of
new name for the store. Since the
contest was announced In The Ob
server on Friday a number of names
have been submitted and are fast
piling up in the contest box. Surely
it wiu take someone but a second or
so to pick the winning name, and
that someone may be you as well as
anyone else. The Dallas Mercantile
company name must be replaced, and
a suitable name must come from this
contest. The name will be selected by
a committee, composed of persons who
have no concern in the matter, and
will be absolutely fair and impartial
in their selection. Send youf selec
tion to The Observer office in a seal
ed envelope, labeled "Name Con
test." CRIDER'S STORE,
SUCCESSOR TO THE DALLAS
MERCANTILE COMPANY
Fl
DR SALE OR TRAD
E
SOCIETY
with diseases. About once in so often to see ;f vou hav.n't got something
I scald the milk and water dishes better for them. When the cattle are
thoroughly and then put a tiny grainin tlie (,arn you cannot help noticing
Good Times Club Mrs. R. L. Chap
man charmingly entertained the mem
bers of the Good Times club at her
home last Thursday. The rooms were
artistically decorated in dahlias and
cut flowers. The afternoon was spent
in fancy work. A delightful lunch
eon was served by the hostess. The
invited guests were Mesdames C. L.
Barnes, Riley Craven, Oscar Hayter,
E. A. Hamilton, Willis Simonton, U.
S. Loughary, I. F. Yoakum, V. C.
Staats, H. McDaniels, J. C. Uglow,
George L. Hawkins, Harry WToods.
Play Five Hundred Miss. Muriel
Grant delightfully entertained a few
members of the younger set with a
I'ive Hundred card party Thursday
evening. The evening was spent in
cards and dancing. The invited guests
were Misses Halhe Smith, Helen
Loughary, Ruth Barrett, Helen Casey,
Maud isames, Marjone rlolmau,
Gladys Loughary, Muriel Grant,
Messrs. Ray Boydston, Edward Cutler,
Herman Hawkins, Walter Kalian
tyne, Frank Barrett, Newman Den
nis, Ted Berg.
WELL IMPROVED 20 ACRES, 2
MILES FROM COTTAGE GROVE.
LEVEL ROAD TO TOWN, FINE
SPRING WATER PIPED INTO
HOUSE, CAN BE PIPED INTO
BARN; 3 ACRES BEARING ITAL
IAN PRUNES, FAMILY ORCHARD
IN BEARING.' WILL SELL, TRADE
FOR RESIDENCE, OR LAND CLOS
ER TO WHERE I LIVE.
H. G. CAMPBELL
DALLAS, ORE.
Dinner Party Miss Irene Barrett
delightfully entertained a number of
her young friends Saturday evening
with a dinner party. A very dainty
dinner was served, which was enjoy
ed by all. After the dinner, MisB
Barrett entertained her guests at the
Grand theater. The invited guests
were: Misses Lucile Loughary, Clau
dia Plank, Irene Barrett, Messrs. Er
nest McCallon, Charles Hayter, Wal
ter Cravens.
Recital Miss Bertha Serr of Dal
las will be presented in a vocal re
cital at the Lincoln high school audi
torium next Tuesday evening by her
instructor, Hartridge G. Whipp. Miss
Serr has been studying under Mr.
Whipp for several seasons and is con
sidered one of the most accomplished
contraltos in Portland.
HENinJneedof
Athletic Sup
plies, Flash
lights and Batteries, Pock
et Cutlery, Bicycles, Mo
torcycles, Sundries, Blast
ing Powder, Gun Repair
ing, Umbrella Repairing,
Bicycle and Motorcycle Re
dairing, or in fact any light
Mechanical Repairing, call
on
L B. HIXSOII, Jr.
PHONE 1072.
316 MAIN ST.
of eopieras in the water. By seeing
that the fowls do not get diseases 1
do not have to waste time treating.
Once in a irreat while a hen gets some
Kimnle disease. One hen started to
have the cholera, but the first day
I forced here to eat coals and in a
day or two she was as sound as ever.
When my chickens begin to have
looseness of the bowels I empty the
ash box in their yard, where they can
get all the coals' they want and thus
they ture themselves.
"1 know that interest in your work
help yon to do it well and this club
work is the sort of a school for the
practical fide of life.
"When one works alone the task is
not nearly so
how nervous the Jersey is beside the
Avrshire."
SHOULD BEAR WITH UNCLE SAM
Shipowners Want Compensation for
Delays At Panama Canal.
The Dallas Commercial club has re
ceived a communition from the Cham
ber of Commerce of the United States
inquiring if the local organization be
lieves that shipowners and charters
whose vessels have been delayed by
reason of slides at the Panama canal
should receive compensation from the
government for time spent in idleness
at the canal, the subject having been
; presented to tbe National chamber by
nteresting as if they the San Francisco chamber. Secre
tive a club and meet to discuss mat- tary Loughary interviewed a number
ten every so often. Besides this, the i of members of the Dallas club, and
instruction and the experience we re- the concensus of opinion appears to
reive now will belp as greatly in our! be that shipowners should stand their
work in the years to come. own loss. The national government
' I f?nt eee to town about once a drives no absolute guarantee that the
week, sometimes more often, some- canal shall be open to traffic of the
times not so often. One cannot do, character named at all times, and this
evervthing jnst so or O. K. on theunfoneen accident, which will prob
farni. for there always seems to be I ably keep the channel closed for sev
oroethinp else to be done when yon j eral weeks to come, is in no way at
want to do one thine. For a month tributable to carelessness or negli
I sold ecr to tbe Monmouth domri-lttenre, and hence the delay should be
tory, bat after a while they would, borne with patience. I
Much Interest Shown.
The offer made by C. L. Crider of
live dollars in merchandise for a name
for the store recently purchased from
the Dallas Mercantile company, is
meeting with many responses, from
people throughout the county, and be
fore the contest comes to a close next
Tuesday, when a committee will open
the sealed letters, Mr. Crider will
have titles galore. Up to this time
about thirty persons have entered the
contest.
WE CAN PROVE IT
SOME GROCERIES FXTJCTtT
ATE IN PRICE WITH THE MAR.
KETj BUT, NO MATTER WHAT
THE MARKET, OUR PRICE IS
THE LOWEST.
SHREWD BUYING AND A BIG
TRADE THE ANSWER.
YOUR PATRONAGE ON TRIAL
IS SOLICITED.
PUT US TO THE PROOF.
simonton & scon
Phone 18. 625 Court street.
J. A. BARHAM
E. V. BARHAM
Arranging Club Booms.
The local Woodmen of the World
are arranging, in the basement of the
building owned by the order rooms for
club purposes, and will eventually in
stall pool and billiard tables therein.
In the meantime the members who
desire may here assemble and enjoy
a social game of cards, peruse current
literature, or spend an evening spin
ning yarns with their fellow lodge-men.
BARHAM BROTHERS
General
Contractors and Builders
REPAIRING AND REMODELING,
CEMENT WORK A SPECIALTY.
LET US FIGURE ON YOUR
FOUNDATIONS AND SIDE
WALKS. Phones 661 and 1012
Dallas, Oregon
Notice.
Notice is hereby given to whom it
may concern that the firm of Burge ft
Evans has been dissolved by mutual
consent. All claims against said firm
should be presented for payment to
D. F. Burge. H. E. EVANS, j
New Jersey will employ goldfish to
fight mosquitoes. The matter of pro-i
viding the goldfish with an excuse
seems -finally to have enlisted atten
n
BLACK S GROCERY
We can please
youifyouwant
the best
SECOND MONTHLY
lav
DALLAS
SATURDAY, NOV. 27
Every farmer in Polk County is urged to par
ticipate in this monthly event by bringing in
anything he may have on his place for sale or
exchange. Everyone has something for which
he has no use, while it is just the thing some
one else wants
Watch This Space Next Week for Fur
ther Particulars.
It pays to attend these sales
Everything is Done
Electrically Now'
"Yes, boy, in my day we had long lines of overhead shafting
with flapping belts right at our elbows. We had to watch close
or get hurt. There were lots of accidents. Then too, every
time we wanted to change speed we had to throw a running
belt. There were only three or four speeds at that."
"You can't realize how easy we have it here with these
G-E motors that will give you any speed you want by simply
turning a crank that can't go wrong."
' G-E motors will help you avoid accidents and in
crease production. Ask .
THE
OREGON POWER CO.
LET US EXPLAIN OUR NEW COOKING BATE TO YOU
W. E. Greenwood, Mgr.
a. Stolti Company, Props.
Dallas Soda Works
Manufacturers of Soft Drinks
Telephone) 701. 411 E11U Street
Star Transfer Co.
WE MOVE ANYTHING
THAT IS MOVEABLE
. PROMPT SERVICE
C. A. & L C. MUSCOTT & A. P. STARR, Props.
Phone SUwb:-Webster's CmfwtiMery Ml Ellis' CMfectiooerj 1K1
Bui 1974