Bohemia nugget. (Cottage Grove, Or.) 1899-1907, May 08, 1907, Image 1

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II WI LI II Fl "II u m t
VOL. IX
LATEST RESERVES
MAY HE INVALID
An Effort to be Made to Have
the Courts so Decide.
Many Legal Lights Retained and an
Interesting Legal Fight is Expect
ed to he Developed Tilt Between
tlit President ind Congress.
An organied clToit im to !n made
to ti;ivi 1 hi 'i(clatii:itioiiM ol I'Msi
dent l!i Kihi-vflt creating vM forest
riKci vntimis during I lif closing
IkmHm of the HeHHititis n the last
coiigresM declai nd invalid C n j -tent
:iiul highly int. I ntf riH-ya have
I K-i 11 letninid ami Ilif !. val li.'lit im
CXpeited to le One ( till IliOht fu-
ti-H'stin; tii 1 1 : 1 vliip'-il in
many veats.
The tight over f iKht rev 1 vatums
and tho nllced l.md fiiinds in tlie
wrM is 1 1 1 fn--.li in the mind of
tllK K'Ih-h1 I'lllill''. Stil;'lllg II II -
der 1 ft t-itt in.iii 1 mid the altitude of
the 1 i .- i'lriii 111 i K)Hiti'u ol their
wishes K-lativi' in (lie management
of f lit I t i. H Hi iW h, I lit i-na t iii-
Hitil 11 I'Iovim-mi 111 the agiicnlt
ural ..,r..pu.,iion bill providing j '-mi t whm mah by' County Inspce
that lh.. iiesidcnt sh-uil I no liiRerjtor Beebe, who said that the visits
Ik-einpewt in I to eieiite f.iieHt ie- lie had niHtle to outlying districts
serves without tin consent of con
gri'HK. Six staKw me named In
this piolnhii ion, including Wash
ington. Wyoming. Idaho, I 'tub,
Monlniia and Colorado, Tin pro
hibition was embodied dec) into
the agricultural appropriation bill,
ho that tin' president co-ibi not veto
it' without vetoing the whole mens
ure and thus stripping the ngrhul
ural ilepHitmeiit of every cent of
appropriation lor a year.
Th picsiiicnt b it the action of
tho congress keenly. He deter
mined however, to go them one
better. The bill was not. passed
until within the last few days of
the Hession. Ho issued a proclama
tion which converted into tho toreHt
reserves of the country no leHS Mian
17,000,(1(10 am-s. This was practi
cally every acre of timber land that
amounts to anything in ho nix
stutca which vcro mentioned in th
lull, coverir-; Mieno vast acrea of
land were issued two days befoie
the president ngned the agricult
ural appto'iiatiou bill. If this was
so it in now true that no one has
ever been able to get hold of the
original of the big blanket piocla
ninlioti nor of the o. iginala of the
proclamations which aio now being
tinned out by the public printer
covering each of tho different reser
vations. It is hinted Htiongly that
tho proehunatioiis were not in fact
IHdUed holorc the president signed
tho agricultural appropriation bill.
If this could be established there
is no wan ant In law nor authority
for the creation of the reserves.
Always in the past in creating
forest reserves, the proclamation
baa set forth distinctly tho exact
boundaries of the proposed reserves
by metes and bounds. In the proc
lamations now I cing printed the
boundaries are referred to simply
"us shown in the accompanying
diagram." Then accompanying
the proclamations is a diagram.
This is hehl not to be legal by the
men who are fighiug the creation
of tho resorves and they, propose to
test the matter in the courts.
Although they are not saying
much about this feature of the case,
there is reason for believing that
the same attorneys who have been
preparing for t lie test of the action
(Con tinned to eighth page)
COTTAGE GROVE, LANE COUNTY
BERRY CROC INJURED. .
Large and Interesting Meeting ot
Fruit Grower Discuss Matters.
The Kngcuo Register says. A
large and enthusiastic meeting of
the fruit growers of thin district
wan held at the circuit court room
Saturday bh the mom was ho largo
the county court loom hud nut
seat fur all of them. Tho meeting
was an inforniHl on', although I lie
president presided with his iiHiial
dignity, it wan a h jrt of a good old
fashioned experience, nutting wheie
each one spoke as tho spirit moved
him. I'iuiii what was brought out
it is certain that the strawberry
I cioji has been Horiounly injured by
! the cold weal her that wc have ex
perienced the liiHt week. Most of
tho growMn rt'poit not over one
half u nop i.t lust. A largo per
cent ot tho bion-onis hhow black
ami ba been seriously injured hy
the frost--.
It was the intention of the Ilor
ticultiuid Hocioty to buy berry
crates and boxes in car lots and
thus secme benefit of betti piii-uj
but on account ol I ho poor piospect
for a crop it was derided that it
would be impossible, to unit a car-1
load.
After the berry question had
beeu liwustted, tlai uiiriiug took
Hit flit tin liift fif klttuvitur und fl
was very encouraging and in aonio
sections they had done better work
than tbosH closer in.
The subject of tho next meeting
will be "Cherries" ami this will no
doubt be very interesting, as it is
hard to gt away frm the subject
at each meeting, but the next meet
ing will be given up entirely to tho
subject.
The interest in these horticultur
al meetings is growing rapidly and
whilo it ia a Very busy time, the
fruit growers realize that it is prof
itable to take a little time off aud
attend these meetings.
To Be or Not to Be"
Tho baseball season is at hand,
but Cottage Grove so fur does not
Heem diaposed to become celebrated
through that channel. AH around
ua we read of the live, rustling
towna, having burned or forming a
club and each one is going around
with a chip on its shoulders labeled
the "champion club of Southern
Oregon." Cottage Grove could lay
claim to this title once upon a time
and could do it again, but v up
pear to lie ,oo busy, while whittling
fence rails and dry goods boxes,
growling aliout how dull it is since
we became dry, to put forth energy
enough to get np a club. There
are plenty of pla.yeia here, and
good ones too, and we have many
enthusiasts, but noue seem to en
thuso enough to take the lead in
this matter. A good base ball team
gives life to a community as does a
brass band and ho does an O. N. (J.
company, it also brings money to
the town iu various ways which
perhaps could not be designated.
By all means let us shake oil' our
lethargy, and mako tho name of
Cottage Grove boom from north to
south and east and west of the
state of Oregon, as a live, go-ahead
bustling city for busiuoss or any
thing else.
Wonderful Eczema Cure.
"Our littlo hoy had eczema for live
years," wrltcu N. A. Adams, Henri
etta, Pa. "Two of our homo doe Lorn
said the ease whs liopolt'dH, hU lung
being affected. We then employed
other doctors, but no benefit resulted.
Hy chance we read about Kleetric
Hitters' bought a hotllo and hooii no
ticed Improvement. Wo continued
this medicine until several bottles
wore used, when our hoy waa com
pletely cured." best ot all blood
medicines and body building' health
tonics, (luarunteed at Benson's Phar
macy. 5(o.
Devoted to the Mining, Lumbering and
SELECTION OF -SCHOOL
TEACHERS
Cottage Grove Public School!
Directors Hold Meeting.. !
1
And Elect Teachers for Next Term '
Prof. C. L. Strange and His As
sistant W. Harvey Retained, and
Also Most of the Present Teachers.
At a meeting of the directors of
the Cottage Grove Public schools
held lust wefk, the following teach
ers were elected for the next year.
Prof. C. L. Strange, principal.
Worth Harvey, assietaot.
MiHs Mary Mundy, High school.
Miss Luln Currin, High school,
(tertrudo Palmer, west aide lut
and 2nd grades.
Neva Perkina, east side 1st and
'2d grades.
Illla Anderson, west side 3d and
4th gi tides.
I,ura Hefty, east side .'id and 4th
grades.
KHa Dickson, west side 4th and
.rth grades.
Norn IJeebe, east side 4th and 5th
giai'es.
Jessie Wilson, (5th grade.
Mary Buxton, 7th grade.
Miss Vena powers and Miss Cor-
delia Grant, whose places are taken
Ijy Misses Buxton and Dickson, did
uot make application. Miss Grant
will teach in Ashland 'and Miss
Powers will lake a much deserved
reHt.
The year jiiBt closing has been
an exceptionally good one for the
schools under the efficient principal
ehip of Prof. StraDge who has
worked hard to bring them up to
their present standard. Prof, Har-1
vey, principal of the Eighth grade,
iw said by the County School Su
perintendent to be one of the best
Kighth grade teachers in the state,
and our schools ore certainly in
good hands for the coming year.
Absent Mindedness.
Two young men, whose nam?s
we withhold, one from Eugene and
one from Cottage Grove, were of
the same mind to attend the dance
at Creswell last Saturday evening.
They each hired a team in their re
spective towns and hied them to
the ball, where it is presumed they
had a good time. When they got
rendy to return home th livery
man at Creswell got out their rigs
and snugly tucked the rugs around
them and they started towards their
homes. After going some miles
the young man from Eugene be
came wise to the fact that either his
team had shed their coat while
standing iu the stable, or had been
transformed in some remarkable
way, but on close examination came
to the conclusion that he was driv
ing away with some one's else rig.
He immediately put back to Cres
well aud learning that the other
rig was well on its way to Cottage
Grove mado all haste to overtake it.
This he succeeded in doing just a
shott distance from towu. Expla
nations followed and tho exchange
made and each one swore secrecy to
each other, but somehow the story
leaked out and they have to endure
many jokes levied at them. Some
say that the drivers attention was
bo entirely taken up holding their
companions from falling out of the
buggy that they really did not
know whether the buggy was being
pulled by a horse or un elephant,
and cared less. Under these oir-
cumbtances the young men are ex
cusable, for most of us have beeu
there ourselves aud know bow
bliud we are at suob times.
Forming Interests of this Community.
OREGON, WEDNESDAY,
SAWMILLS MAY
CLOSE DOWN
Many Rumors Arc Floating
Around to that Effect.
Millions of Feet of Lumber Waiting to
be Removed to Market but Cars
Cannot be Secured-Logging Camps
Wfll Probably Follow Suit.
Rutflors are plentiful that mnny
of the nawmilis in this hcetion are
to be nhut down in the near future,
in consequence of the inability of
the railroads to furnish cars lor the
transportation of the lumber o the
markets. If this u done, it will
probably be followed in a tdiort
time by the shutting down of the
logging camps, thus thiowing hun
dreds out of employment, and
causing a stagnation in all linos of
business. This state of affairs cer
tainly presents a most extraordinary
spectacle; one that has never been
witnessed before in this or any oth
er country. In tho most prosper
ous times ever kuowu in the his-
'tory ot the country; when work is
plentiful and labor scarce, we are
threatened in 0119 way to face the
result of a panic.
Hard timea and panics have here
jtofore been the result of overpro
duction and lack of confidence. At
this time, however, we are facing
just the reverse, the demand is
greater than the supply, or is made
that way by the inability to get
the product lrom the producer to
the consumer. Although we more
particularly allude to our lumber
industry, the same stale of ofTuirs
in everything else seems to exist
more or lesa, from tUe Atlantic to
the Pacific. The cry for cirs is
continually beiug made to the rail
road companies which they cannot
furnish, because they simply have
not got them, if the officials are to
believed.
We are informed that tho mill
in Cottage Grove alone, could
shut down, aud yet load ten cars
of lumber a day for three weeks,
and have a market for every foot.
Other mills in the vicinity can do
the same according to their capaci
ty. The market everywhere is good
and is not confined to the United
States.
Unlike the panicky times of '93,
however, the laboring :mxn will not
feel its effects first, if ,it all, as the
demand for labor in the various
branches of industry is far greater
than the supply, and they will turn
their hands to other lines. The mill
owners and the log coniractors are
the losers, even if they are only
compelled to shut down for a short
time, and leaving out of the con
sideration, the fact, that while shut
down the plant is earning nothing,
the crew is scattered and g ne, and
a new one has to be secured, bo
that perhaps the mill and camp can
be only run it half its capacity for
somo time.
What will be the ultimate out
come of this car difficulty it is hard
to conjecture. Probably the peo
ple are as much to blame as the
railroads, as cases are not rare
whoro cars have beeu received and
not unloaded for days, or uutil the
agent gets after them with a sharp
stick. Then the railroad compa
nie may also be guilty of what
tbey are accused. They may dis
criminate in some cases, and iu
many other ways not do as well
us they might, but from what has
leaked out as coming from officials,
and from what can bo lead in all
the leading papers in the country, 1
the1 great trouble is that they have-1
not got the curs.
MAY 8, 1907.
SHEEP MUST BE DIPPED.
The Law Passed by Last Legislature
Makes it Compulsory.
Tho law passed by the la.t legis
lature with reference to sheep in
spection and requiring them to be
dipped under the supervision of the
board of sheep commissioners is to
be strictly enforced this year. There
has been more or less scabies
among the sheep in Oregon, and
the st tin has lost much money and
much creuit ior tack 01 legal au
thority to stamp it out.
Dr. J. Christi", the d -pr.ty state
sheep inspec tor for this county will
have a lare portaUo tank or dip
ping tunk constructed and will go
fiom place to place ovr the coun
try dipping fbeep. The law makes
it obligatory on c-vry idieep grow
er to have them dipped, and tbey
are required to dip with solutions
prepared according to formulas pre
paied by the general government.
The law says:
"The board will refuse to rerog
nize any sheep not dipped under
the supervision of the government
or state inspector or his deputies
and in accordance wi'h the
rules
and regulations of this boaid. Mix. j work can be supplied by the or
ing of all dip must be supervised by j gani.ation of coast artiflery com pa -the
federal or state sheep inspector j nies in the various states of the
or his deputy." Union, which organizatio s, duriDg
The portable vat will be hauled j tbe time otlie than when they are
from place to place for the conven-
i;nce of owners of sheep. Those
who have Bmall bands may drive
them to some central place in a lo
cality where a good butch can be
dipped and thus lessen the expense
greatly, as the cost is paid by the
owners. After the dipping a cer
tificate of health will be issued to
the owner of the sheep and the law
provides for quarantining any band
not so dipped. Work will com
mence just after sheaiing has been
done.
Along the 0. & S. E. Railroad.
Although thcro are many goi -natured
jokes made at the expense
of the Oregon & S mth Eastern
railroad, a trip from one end t ; the
other should couvince the most
skeptical that the road was not
built lor a summer jaunt. It is
there for business aud we would
wager that not a joker or anyone
else living along its roilfe, would
have it abandoned if they could
prevent it. The roa 1 bed itself is
excellent and equal to ninny and
surpasses seme of tho more preten
tious roads in the e.ist. It is well
ballasted ard is smooth riding.
Certainly the passenger cars are
not Pullman or refliniug chair af
fairs, but one can make himself
very comfortable nevertheless, and
they probabiy have seen the day
when they were considered rtylish.
The route of the Oregou & South
Eastern was built for business. Its
principle object to bring out the
logs from the timber belts and the
finished products of the numerous
mills uow located along its lines. It
probably also is headed for tho rich
mining country of the Bohemia
section, but at present is only about
half way from Cottage Grove.
Its course roiiows trie now river
and runs through a number of
beautiful and productive ranches
for eight or ten miles, after which
the valley closes in and the train
winds its way through rocks and
magnificent timber until it reaches
Disaton, the present terminus and
where a large mill is located. The
scenery is really delightful along
the route, not so wild and pictur
esque as through the Siskiyous but
well worth taking the trip to see.
We are sorry wo chose a wrong day
to make the trip, as the train time
did not allow us opportunity than
more to see the different places as
wo passed through. We extend
our thanks however to Superintend
ent Protzman and other officials for
the courtesy extended us and will
certainly tima o r-Vlv e1 k
the future wheu wc again vi.t wa,
section.
NO. 14
0. N. 0. TO HAVE
AN OUTING
Will Probably Be Held From
July I, to 12.
The Camp of Instruction to be Held at
the Coast Defense Forts, ar Experi
ment by the War Department Sug
gested by Ex-Secretary Root.
The camp of instruction of the
infantry regiments of the National
Guard will be held this year at the
coast defense forts. It is the in
tention to hold this camp between
the 1st and 15th of July for a per
iod o ten days. The exact dates
will probably be from July 'A, to 12,
inclusive.
This plan was originally suggest
ed by Secretary Root when he was
secretary of war. The object of
this amp is to determine whether
or not the present deficiency in the
; number of men for coast defense
i sti'ioned m the forts for instruc-
tion, will be maintained and used
as infantry organizations. The
work this year will be in the na
ture ot an experiment of the war
department to determrne, if possi
ble, the feasibility of the plan. The
order f 10 en the war department cov
ering this tour of duty prescribes
that officers of the militia shnll be
assigned to duty with officers of
like grade in the coast artillery or
ganizations. Officers Appointed Co. E.
At the drill and business meet
ing held by Company E Thursday
evening Captain Johnson named
the following non-commissioned of
ficers: rt
First Sergeant, Frank P. Snod
grass. Second Sergeant, Harley II.
Petrie.
Third Sergeant, Elmer E. Doo
little. Fourth Sergeant, Frank Wood
ruff.
Fifth Sergeant, Andrew Brund.
Quarter Master Sergeant, Wm.
II. Ostrander.
First Corporal, Natty II. Martin.
Second Corporal, Lester G.
Hutchinson,
Third Corporal, Albert Rich
mond. Fourth Corporal, Albert Zurull.
The office of 5th Cth and 7th
Corporal was left vacant for com
petition. Musicians, L. P. Santord and Al
bert Griffin.
Company Clerk, L. W. Baker.
Artificer, Jacob Fladager.
The company will meet for drill
every Tuesday night in the Pacific
Timber Company's building until
the new armory to be built by
Lieutenant Lawsou is completed.
My Best Friend.
Alexander Henton, who Uvea on
itural llouto 1, Port Kdwurd, N. Y.
says: "Dr. Klnjr'H New Discovery is
my tiest earthly friend. It cured me
of asthma six years ago. It has also
performed a wonderful cure of Incip
ient consumption for my son'u wife.
The first bottle ended the terrible
cough, aud this accomplished, the
other symptoms left one by one,
until she was perfectly well. Or.
Kinir'H New Discovery's now er over
coughs and colds U simply marvel
ous." No other remedy has ever
equaled It. Fully guaranteed by Hen
pon'n IMiarmncv. COo and tl. Trial
For legal blanks Nugget office