Cottage Grove sentinel. (Cottage Grove, Or.) 1909-current, May 08, 2019, Image 1

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    CGSENTINEL.COM
3
Est. 1889
WEDNESDAY EDITION | MAY 8, 2019 | $1.00
S entinel
C ottage G rove
VOL. 131, NO. 19
S ERVING
THE COMMUNITIES OF
C OTTAGE G ROVE ,
D ORENA , D RAIN , E LKTON
AND Y ONCALLA
Your Local News Delivered Your Way: In Print. Online. On the Go!
PERSONAL | COMMERCIAL
BENEFITS | SURETY
Living history coming to The Grove
By Cindy Weeldreyer
Special to The Sentinel
(541) 942-0555
PayneWest.com/Cottage-Grove
WEATHER
Partly cloudy with a
high of 78 and a low
tonight of 52.
Full forecast on A5
COMMUNITY
Surrounded by children
and steeped in 19th century
history, Karen Rainsong is a
happy and fulfilled woman.
Beginning this month, she
continues her lifelong dream
of offering workshops and
summer camps focused on
pioneer living from Singing
Creek Educational Center’s
new home in the historic Dr.
Snapp House at 360 South
River Road.
Rainsong is the founder
and volunteer executive di-
rector of the Singing Creek
Educational Center (SCEC),
a nonprofit organization
she created in 2015. She is
an artist and educator who
grew up in Southern Cali-
fornia and moved to Oregon
27 years ago to raise her fam-
ily in “a smaller town with a
strong and creative commu-
nity vibe.”
thing unique.”
Her fascination with the
culture of the Old West
led to a surprising genea-
logical discovery that she
and Opal Whitely share a
common ancestor: Daniel
Boone.
To honor her kinship
with Opal, she named
her nonprofit after Opal’s
childhood diary, “The
Singing Creek Where the
Willows Grow,” first pub-
lished in the 1920s. She
said she is delighted to
now have her organization
located in Opal’s home-
town.
The mission of SCEC
is to inspire children and
families toward an appre-
CINDY WHEELDRYER/FOR THE SENTINEL
Summer workshops and camps will be offered this ciation of local history
summer by Singing Creek Educational Center, through hands-on learn-
ing. Its interactive history
offering hand-on history experiences.
programs include school
field trips, classes, pioneer
“I’ve always loved kids and community for living histo-
summer camps and
nature,” Rainsong said. “I ry programs for kids and I
See HISTORY 11A
saw there was a need in the knew we could offer some-
Cottage Theatre to undergo dramatic transformation
Memorial bench for
local icon is installed.
A3
SPORTS — B
Warriors continue
winning ways.
B1
• RECORDS
Obituaries
Police Log
Grad News
A2
• LORANE NEWS
A5
• CLASSIFIEDS
Listings and public
notices
B7-B9
By Damien Sherwood
dsherwood@cgsentinel.com
Cottage Theatre has closed
its doors for the summer as
extensive construction is set
to expand the building and
refurbish the house.
“It’s going to look and feel
very different,” said the the-
ater’s executive director Su-
san Goes. “The colors will
be different; the sound of the
space will be different.”
Dubbed “ACT III,” the re-
modeling will improve and
increase seating, upgrade
technical abilities and rede-
sign the lobby for improved
flow. One of the most nota-
ble changes in the theater’s
house will be the seating ar-
rangements.
Currently, about 150 seats
wrap 180 degrees around the
stage, most of them installed
when the building was built
in 1998 — and even then,
these were bought used from
a church in Portland.
With age, some of them
have become prone to
squeak and distract from
performances.
“And we’re spending a lot
more time than we’re enjoy-
ing replacing broken bolts
and things that go wrong
with the seats,” Goes said.
DAMIEN SHERWOOD/COTTAGE GROVE SENTINEL
Among the changes will be a new seating arrangment for theater goers a better,
deeper view of the stage from any seat in the house.
“So we knew that these seats
were really approaching the
end of their useful life span.”
In choosing replacements,
Cottage Theatre invited
members of the communi-
ty to try nominee seats and
vote for their favorites. The
new seats were picked for
their comfort and one-size-
fits-all appeal.
With new seats also comes
a new view of the stage. Since
1998, the theater has gradu-
ally seen the production of
more large-scale musicals.
“So this idea of wrapping
around 180 degrees doesn’t
really make sense with our
current repertoire,” said
Goes. “When you have a big
set on stage, it’s just really
difficult for those people in
those far side seats to see all
of it.”
To address this, the project
will bring seating in about
15 degrees on each side, en-
abling a deeper view of each
production for all audience
members.
“In the new arrangement,
we’ll be able to have an actor
at the back wall and
See THEATRE 7A
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Cascade Chorus to croon for Carousel Project
By Damien Sherwood
dsherwood@cgsentinel.com
541- 942-3325 ph • 541-942-3328 fax
P.O. Box 35, Cottage Grove, OR 97424
With several years sep-
arating its last local per-
formance, the barbershop
performance group Cascade
Chorus is returning to Cot-
tage Grove on Sunday, May
19, to perform at the Calva-
ry Chapel as part of a fund-
raising effort for the Cottage
Grove Carousel project.
“Barbershop harmony is
very unique,” said Bob Mar-
tindale, lead section leader
of the chorus. “There are
things required in arranging
to make it ‘barbershop har-
mony.’”
The group performs reg-
ularly in Eugene and other
Oregon cities, seeking to
preserve the musical insti-
tutions of a cappella and
four-part harmonies while
delivering
entertainment
Emerald Valley Armory, LLC
Handguns • Long Rifles
Concealed Carry Classes
Tues. - Sat. 10-6
147 E. Oregon Ave. Creswell, OR 97426
541-895-2666
and charitable services to
communities.
It was through the Cot-
tage Theatre that Martin-
dale joined the barbershop
chorus in 2000. As a stand-
in for barbershop singers in
the production of “The Mu-
sic Man,” Martindale caught
the attention of the Cascade
Chorus.
“One of the guys came to
me and said, ‘Do you sing
with anybody?’” Martindale
recalled. “I said, ‘not really.’
He said, ‘You do now. You’re
coming with us.’”
Cascade Chorus rep-
resents a division of the larg-
er Barbershop Harmony So-
ciety which covers swathes
of the United States and
Canada. Oregon’s local divi-
sion was established in 1946
and has seen past member-
ship at times number more
See CHORUS 7A
May 2019
Special Election
overview
By Damien Sherwood
dsherwood@cgsentinel.com
With ballots mailed and
offi cial drop sites opened
for Lane County voters as
of May 2, the county’s 2019
Special Election has en-
tered full swing.
Most ballots and voter
pamphlets should be re-
ceived by today for those
who made the April 30
cut-off for voter registra-
tion.
For residents of Cottage
Grove and the surround-
ing areas in Lane Coun-
ty, the following is a brief
breakdown of ballot items
of interest. In the week
preceding Election Day,
Th e Sentinel will provide a
deeper dive into the South
Lane School District race
and Lane County mea-
sures 20-299 and 20-300.
South Lane School
District #45J3
Of four seats available
on the South Lane School
District board of directors,
three are running unop-
posed. Incumbents Tam-
my Hodgkinson and Jerry
Settelmeyer are running
for positions 1 and 6, re-
spectively.
Merlene Martin, who
currently holds the third
unopposed
seat,
an-
nounced last year that she
was not going to run for
re-election; she was elected
to the board in 2011.
For that position, Dustin
Bengtson will be running
unopposed.
Bengtson’s
candidate fi ling form notes
that he currently works as
a federal employee for the
U.S. Army Corps of En-
gineers. A graduate from
the University of Iowa, he
holds a Bachelor of Arts in
communications.
Th e remaining seat be-
ing contested this year
is position 7. Incumbent
Gary Mort has held the
position since 2015. Mort,
who has a doctorate degree
in chemistry from the Uni-
versity of California-Davis,
is a faculty instructor in
the science department at
Lane Community College.
Challenging the seat is
Demian Schwartz, a for-
mer school administrator
with a Master of Arts in
education from Goddard
College. Schwartz lists ex-
perience with several local
non-profi t boards in her
fi ling.
“I believe strongly in civ-
ic responsibility and com-
munity service,” Schwartz
states in the voters’ pam-
phlet. “As an educator my
primary work is with chil-
dren and families; this is
the population I feel
See ELECTION 9A
Michele Monroe, LCSW
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541-255-8822 • 1450 Birch Ave • Cottage Grove, OR 97424
• Individual and Family Counseling
• Insurance and Sliding Scale
• Accepting New Clients
• Weekend and Weekday Appointments Available