Cottage Grove sentinel. (Cottage Grove, Or.) 1909-current, April 05, 2017, Page 4A, Image 4

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    4A COTTAGE GROVE SENTINEL APRIL 5, 2017
O PINION
Is the DASH diet the best diet for heart health?
The DASH
(Dietary Ap-
proaches
to
Stop
Hyper-
tension) diet was developed by scientists at
the National Institutes of Health specifi cally
to reduce blood pressure, and has been ex-
tensively studied. Many physicians and ex-
perts recommend the DASH diet for reducing
blood pressure and improving heart health. It
emphasizes vegetables, fruits, and whole grains; it is low in sat-
urated and trans fats; low in sodium; and rich in potassium, cal-
cium, magnesium, fi ber, and protein. While the DASH diet does
help to reduce blood pressure, there is much room for improve-
ment to make it a truly heart-healthy diet.
By Joel Fuhrman MD
For The Sentinel
DASH diet guidelines:
•
4-5 servings/day of vegetables
•
4-5 servings/day of fruit
•
Up to 6 ounces/day of meat, fi sh or poultry
•
2-3 servings/day of low-fat dairy
•
2-3 tablespoons/day of oil
•
4-5 servings/week of nuts, seeds and beans
•
Up to 5 servings/week of sweets
The DASH diet is typically recommended to patients with heart
disease or who have risk factors for heart disease. There is evi-
dence from randomized controlled dietary intervention trials that
the DASH diet helps to reduce blood pressure and LDL choles-
terol. But are these reductions enough to offer signifi cant protec-
tion against cardiovascular death? Compare the results of studies
on the DASH diet to those in a recent study, which document-
ed survey data and case histories the dramatic weight loss and
cardiovascular benefi ts possible with a nutrient-dense, plant rich
(Nutritarian) diet.
The DASH diet alone produced a weight loss of less than one
pound in a four-month study; combined with calorie restriction
and exercise, the average weight loss was 19 pounds.1 On a Nu-
tritarian diet, after two years, respondents who started out obese
had maintained an average weight loss of more than 50 pounds.3
In people with high blood pressure, the DASH diet reduced sys-
tolic (top number) blood pressure by 6.82 mmHg and diastolic
(bottom number) pressure by 3.59 mmHg. A lower sodium ver-
sion of the DASH diet (1500 mg/day sodium) reduced systolic
blood pressure by 11.5 mm Hg.4,5 Respondents with high blood
pressure who followed a Nutritarian diet reduced systolic blood
pressure by an average of 26 mm Hg and 14.7 mmHg in diastolic
blood pressure. These improvements in blood pressure on a Nutri-
tarian diet led to 60 percent reduction in the use of blood pressure
medications.3
The DASH diet reduced total cholesterol by up to 14 mg/dl, and
LDL by about 11 mg/dl, with no decrease in triglyceride levels.6,
7 In comparison, on a Nutritarian diet, the average decrease in
LDL cholesterol was 42 mg/dl, and there was an average 79.5 mg/
dl decrease in triglycerides.3
The DASH diet is an improvement for most Americans: more
vegetables and fruits, fewer sweets, more whole grains, and a
smaller amount of oil. However, the DASH diet does not empha-
size nuts, seeds, and beans, which have profound and extensively
researched benefi ts for cardiovascular health. In addition, it en-
courages consumption of too much animal products, including up
to 3 servings of dairy daily. Nor does the DASH encourage eating
leafy greens and cruciferous vegetables.
The DASH diet was designed to be acceptable to the average
American.and this usually results in an overreliance on animal
foods for a protein and fat source. The problem is – if you want
big changes in health, you have to make suffi cient changes in your
diet. The Nutritarian diet is designed to maximize results and
therefore utilizes green vegetables, beans, nuts, and other foods
with documented protective effects making the Nutritarian diet the
most effective, safest and healthiest way to eat.
There is now a signifi cant amount of research documenting that
heart disease is almost completely preventable (and reversible)
with a diet rich in whole plant foods and low in processed foods
and animal products.3,9-11 In my book The End of Heart Dis-
ease, I devote an entire chapter to comparing my high-nutrient
(Nutritarian) dietary guidelines to a number of diet plans, includ-
ing the DASH diet, that are typically recommended for improving
heart health. For those who desire reversal of high blood pressure,
high cholesterol and dramatic reduction in plaque burden and pro-
tection from premature death—there is no equal.
Dr. Fuhrman is a #1 New York Times best-selling author and
a board certifi ed family physician specializing in lifestyle and
nutritional medicine. The Eat To Live Cookbook offers over 200
unique disease-fi ghting delicious recipes and his newest book,
The End of Heart Disease, offers a detailed plan to prevent and re-
verse heart disease using a nutrient-dense, plant-rich eating style.
Visit his informative website at DrFuhrman.com. Submit your
questions and comments about this column directly to newsques-
tions@drfuhrman.com
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Swinging Bridge
We Want Your News!
The Cottage Grove Sentinel
wants to be your source
for all things Cottage Grove.
But we need your help!
If you’ve got a news tip,
we’d be glad to hear about it:
People in Cottage Grove are asking "What can I do to bring back
the Swinging Bridge?" As a representitive of Friends of Cottage
Grove Swinging Bridge, I met with City Manager Richard Meyers
the day after the City Council meeting and had a discussion of how
interested citizens can help move the bridge forward. The biggest
limitation is money. The city is planning on applying for a grant
but that will not cover all the expense. Indeed the costs are as yet
unknown for sure. With the unanimous decision to investigate the
Option Two, restore the bridge as near as possible to the current de-
sign, the City Council asked the City Engineer to inform the coun-
sulting engineering fi rm to pursue a detailed plan investigating that
option. There are some regulations and design concerns that need
to be addressed but they are going to see what is possible and come
up with as accurate estimate as possible.
Now this leads us back to what can I do? City Manager Meyers
suggested that we can raise money and place it in a special City
Trust Fund. These monies will be, by law, only available to be used
on the swinging bridge. I know that you might be thinking "Oh
yeah, right!" and the fi rst chance the city needs money they will raid
that fund. Richard Meyers not only clearly stated the impossibility
of this being legal, but also showed me the accounts of other special
trusts that the city maintains. One is the Ed Jenks trust fund which
is the oldest on the city's books and provides large print books for
the CG Library.
So you can go into City Hall and make a donation to the Swing-
ing Bridge fund. While they could not give me tax advice, it should
be tax deductable and they will give a receipt. You can also mail in
a donation and they will send a receipt if requested. So next time
you go in to pay your water bill or what have you consider making
a donation to the Swinging Bridge. It will also increase our chances
of getting our grant if the city can show that Cottage Grove citizens
are willing to put their money where their mouth is. Thank you,
Dana Merryday
Cottage Grove
$ PUUBHF ( SPWF 4 FOUJOFM
In person: 116 N. Sixth Street, Cottage Grove
Email: cgnews@cgsentinel.com
Office phone: 942-3325
C ottage G rove
S entinel
(541) 942
942-3325
3325 • 116 N.
N SIXTH ST.
ST
WWW.CGSENTINEL.COM
Administration
John Bartlett, Regional Publisher
Gary Manly, General Manager ................................................. Ext. 207
gmanly@cgsentinel.com
Aaron Ames, Marketing Specialist ........................................... Ext. 216
aames@cgsentinel.com
Tammy Sayre, Marketing Specialist ......................................... Ext. 213
tsayre@cgsentinel.com
Editorial
Caitlyn May, Editor. ................................................................. Ext. 212
cmay@cgsentinel.com
Sam Wright, Sport Editor ......................................................... Ext. 204
swright@cgsentinel.com
Customer Service
Carla Williams, Offi ce Manager .............................................. Ext. 200
Legals, Classifi eds .......................................... Ext. 200
cwilliams@cgsentinel.com
Production
Ron Annis, Production Supervisor ............................................. Ext.215
graphics@cgsentinel.com
Letters to the Editor policy
The Cottage Grove Sentinel receives many letters to the editor. In order to ensure that your letter will be
printed, letters must be under 300 words and submitted by Friday at 5 p.m. Letters must be signed and
must include an address, city and phone number or e-mail address for verifi cation purposes. No anony-
mous letters will be printed. Letters must be of interest to local readers. Personal attacks and name calling
in response to letters are uncalled for and unnecessary. If you would like to submit an opinion piece,
Another View must be no longer than 600 words. To avoid transcription errors, the Sentinel would prefer
editorial and news content be sent electronically via email or electronic media. Hand written submissions
will be accepted, but we may need to call to verify spelling, which could delay the publishing of the sub-
mission.
(USP 133880)
Subscription Mail Rates in Lane and Portions of Douglas Counties:
Ten Weeks..............................................................................................$9.10
One year ............................................................................................. $36.15
e-Edition year ...................................................................................... $36.00
ALL NEW WEBSITE
Rates in all other areas of United States: Ten Weeks $11.70; one year, $46.35, e-Edition $43.00.
In foreign countries, postage extra.
No subscription for less than Ten Weeks. Subscription rates are subject to change upon 30 days’ notice. All subscritptions must be paid
prior to beginning the subscription and are non-refundable.
Periodicals postage paid at Cottage Grove, Oregon.
LAUNCHING APRIL 10TH
Postmaster: Send address changes to P.O. Box 35, Cottage Grove, OR 97424.
Local Mail Service:
If you don’t receive your Cottage Grove Sentinel on the Wednesday of publication, please let us know.
Call 942-3325 between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Advertising Ownership:
All advertising copy and illustrations prepared by the Cottage Grove Sentinel become the property of the Cottage Grove Sentinel and
may not be reproduced for any other use without explicit written prior approval.
Copyright Notice: Entire contents ©2017 Cottage Grove Sentinel.
WWW.CGSENTINEL.COM