Cottage Grove sentinel. (Cottage Grove, Or.) 1909-current, October 21, 2015, Page 8A, Image 8

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    8A COTTAGE GROVE SENTINEL October 21, 2015
B OND
Continued from page 1A
Parent introduced the crowd
to Mike Gorman and Greg Mc-
Cracken of BLRB Architects,
the fi rm chosen to design the
new school. Gorman, a 1978
Cottage Grove High gradu-
ate, also attended the Harrison
School he’s hoping to replace.
The two walked the group
through the process they’ll un-
dergo to design the school, after
which a brainstorming session
was held to fl esh out the op-
portunities and challenges to
passing the bond, in addition to
what’s important in building a
new school.
The group stated that it prized
fl exible, comfortable and dura-
ble classrooms, spaces for early
learning groups, easy mainte-
nance and safety and security.
It listed opportunities to build a
sustainable structure, to cater to
community use of the building
and serve an at-risk population.
Challenges included the possi-
ble sentiment in the community
against the bond’s passage, the
plans for the current Harrison
property and how to deal with
requests to attend a brand-new
Harrison School.
The School Board plans an-
other community conversation
about the Harrison bond on
Wednesday, Nov. 18, a meeting
that will likely take place at the
CGHS cafetorium.
yesterday.’”
Later in the meeting, Coun-
cilor Mike Fleck asked if plans
couldn’t be changed so that
trick-or-treating and Art Walk
wouldn’t confl ict.
“We knew there would be
people who wouldn’t like the
decision, whichever decision
was made,” responded City
Manager Richard Meyers, who
pointed out that the City was
not part of the decision-making
process.
“The events were already not
on top of each other,” he said.
“The streets should be cleared
after trick-or-treating by 5:30.”
Meyers said that last year,
Halloween activities bled into
the time reserved for Art Walk,
which is not expected to hap-
pen this year, as a light parade
planned at dusk will not be
held.
“The opinion among the busi-
ness owners was almost 50/50,”
Meyers said. “But there were
a number of people who said
that if it was on Saturday, they
wouldn’t participate.”
From the audience, Chamber
of Commerce Director Travis
Palmer agreed.
H ALLOWEEN
Continued from page 1A
that having downtown trick-
or-treating and Art Walk togeth-
er is a “bad idea.”
“Art Walk draws a particular
kind of visitor,” she said. “Busi-
ness owners put out food for
them. Halloween should be on
Halloween. Families are going
to come downtown on Saturday,
and we’ll have to say ‘we did it
T&T
Continued from page 6A
dry their tummy. I then cradle
the cats in a dry cloth and walk
them around the house to dis-
tract them while the cloth ab-
sorbs more water. Then we put
the cats in a preheated bathroom
to blow them dry, along with a
treat for us all surviving the ex-
perience! Never use a hot set-
ting on a blow dryer! Cats’ skin
is tender and easily burns.
Place a litter box, drinking
water and food in the warm
bathroom to keep cats warm
until they dry. Soon your fl uffy-
soft cat will emerge. Once dry,
our cats walk with a pride as if
they feel clean and look elegant,
and they quickly forgive our
transgression against them.
Our cats are so used to baths
that they sit patiently waiting for
it to be over, making both our
lives easier. A humorous friend
once said, “It is easier to indulge
in my favorite pastime of rock
climbing out of the ‘Valley of
Fire’ than to bathe my cat!” So,
I am mailing her cat this helpful
article!
MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENT
BEGINS OCTOBER 15TH
Do you need to Review next years choice?
Call Paul to
help simplify
the complicated.
541-517-7362
Tree farm to host pumpkin,
chainsaw carving expo
A
t the Twin Timbers Tree
Farm, just south of Cre-
swell on Hwy. 99, there will
be a Chainsaw and Pumpkin
Carving Exposition and Auc-
tion with live demonstrations by
professional carvers on Friday,
Oct. 23 and Saturday, Oct. 24.
Admission is free. Hours on Fri-
day are 10 a.m. until dusk and
Saturday 10 a.m. with auction
of carvings starting at 4 p.m.
For more information, call 541-
214-8550.
NOTICE OF CITY OF COTTAGE
GROVE HISTORIC LANDMARK
COMMISSION VACANCIES
The City of Cottage Historic Landmark Commission
has two vacancies to this volunteer body. The
Commissioners are appointed by the City
Council. The Historic Landmark Commission
meets once a month on an as needed basis in the
evening. People interested in applying for this
position need to complete an Historic Landmark
Commission application available on line at: http://
cottagegrove.org/Historic%20Landmark%20
Commissioner%20Application.pdf or at the
Community Development Department at City
Hall. Applicants must have a demonstrated
positive interest, knowledge, or competence in
historic preservation. The deadline for receiving
applications is November 6 th by Noon. For
further information please contact the Community
Development Department at 942-3340.
Paul Henrichs ~ Independent Agent
coverage4oregon@gmail.com
O FFBEAT
Continued from page 4A
Southern Methodist Church
in Ashland.
Bell fi nally settled in Corvallis
in 1907, but he was no stranger
to the town. He was, by then, the
most well known pastor of any
denomination in Oregon. He’d
led Methodist and Presbyterian
congregations in Baker City,
Independence and Roseburg,
as well as at least one previous
stint in Corvallis. He’d deliv-
ered guest sermons at hundreds
of churches of various denomi-
nations. He’d also earned the
informal title of “the marrying
parson” — he’d presided over
more than 1,000 marriages and
had become a family tradition
for many families; the sons and
daughters of couples he’d mar-
ried would seek him out when
it was time for them to get mar-
ried in turn. He also had held the
offi ce of Grand Chaplain of the
Masons for longer than anyone
else in history.
And he’d made a name for
himself in a new kind of Civil
War: the one between the rival
football teams of Oregon Agri-
cultural College (now Oregon
State University) and the Uni-
versity of Oregon. Bell joined
the board of trustees of OAC in
1874 — six years after the col-
lege was founded, and the same
year the rival U. of O. was es-
tablished. He became one of the
founders of the athletic program
at OAC and was an enthusiastic
spectator at the very fi rst Civil
War football game in 1894 — a
game from which would spring
the oldest college football rival-
ry on the West Coast. Follow-
ing the 16-0 victory for OAC,
Bell got a little carried away; he
rushed down the hill to the bank
of the Marys River and threw
his top hat into the drink.
After that, every year the Bea-
vers beat the Ducks, Bell would
re-enact this historic hat-dunk-
ing. This became one of Corval-
lis’ biggest social events; thou-
sands of fellow Beavers fans
would make the journey with
him to the water’s edge and
cheer the hat on its slow, watery
way toward the Willamette. For-
tunately for Bell’s fi nances, the
Beavers didn’t win very often
at fi rst; after that fi rst year, they
won just four games in the fol-
lowing 30 years (although they
tied eight).
In 1921, the college named its
football stadium after Bell, and
from then until 1953, the Bea-
vers played in Bell Field.
J.R.N. Bell died in 1928, right
at the end of the Beavers’ fi rst
streak of back-to-back Civil War
wins (1925-1927). He was bur-
ied in Crystal Lake Cemetery,
near his old friend and former
wartime enemy Thorp, and al-
most within a hat’s toss of the
Marys River.
(Sources: Fletcher, Randol B.
Hidden History of Civil War Or-
egon. Charleston: History Press,
2011; Corvallis Gazette-Times,
27 July 1915)
hanks for looking
into our Advantage.
We’re a Medicare plan you can
trust, started by Oregon doctors.
Now offering a wide range of HMO
and PPO plans—including options
with $0 monthly premiums—as well
as great choices for prescription
drug coverage. Come to a free
seminar. We’ll help you put your
finger on the one that’s right for you.
Reservations & information:
Toll Free: 844-867-1156
Toll Free TTY: 711
8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
7 days a week
hink well. Be well. ™
www.trilliumchp.com
www.TrilliumAdvantage.com
J oin any of our free seminars.
COTTAGE GROVE
EUGENE
JUNCTION CITY
VENETA
Cottage Grove City Hall
400 E. Main St., Cottage Grove
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
Campbell Senior Center
Elsie’s Room
155 High St., Eugene
฀฀฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀฀฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
Junction City
Community Center
175 W. 7th Ave., Junction City
฀฀฀
฀ ฀ ฀฀฀
฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
City of Veneta
Community Center
25192 E. Broadway, Veneta
฀฀฀
฀ ฀ ฀฀฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀฀฀
฀ ฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀฀฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
Valley River Inn
1000 Valley River Way, Eugene
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
SPRINGFIELD
CRESWELL
City of Creswell
Community Center
99 S. 1st St., Creswell
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
FLORENCE
Florence Events Center
715 Quince St., Florence
฀฀฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
Papa’s Pizza
1577 Coburg Rd., Eugene
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
Petersen Barn
870 Berntzen Rd., Eugene
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
Veterans Memorial Assn.
1626 Willamette St., Eugene
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀฀฀
฀
Countryside Pizza & Grill
645 River Road, Eugene
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
Papa’s Pizza
4011 Main St., Springfield
฀฀฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀฀฀ ฀ ฀
฀
Willamalane Community
Recreation Center
250 S. 32nd St., Springfield
฀฀฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀฀฀
฀
OAKRIDGE
City of Oakridge
47674 School St., Oakridge
฀฀฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
฀ ฀ ฀
฀
EVENING
SEMINARS
Trillium Community
Health Plan
Cascade Rm.
1800 Millrace Dr., Eugene
฀฀฀
฀฀฀
฀
฀
฀฀฀
฀
฀
฀฀฀
฀
฀
฀ ฀
฀ ฀
฀ ฀
฀ ฀
฀ ฀
฀ ฀
฀ ฀
฀ ฀
฀
฀
฀
฀
฀
฀
฀
฀
฀
฀
Trillium Community Health Plan is a HMO & PPO plan with a Medicare contract. A sales person will be present with Trillium
Community Health Plan is a HMO & PPO plan with a Medicare contract. A sales person will be present with information and
applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 844-867-1156 or TTY 771. Enrollment
in Trillium Advantage depends on contract renewal. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. For full dual
members the part B premium is covered by the state.
H2174_AD212N Accepted 9/28/2013