Cottage Grove sentinel. (Cottage Grove, Or.) 1909-current, August 12, 2015, Page 5A, Image 5

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    COTTAGE GROVE SENTINEL August 12, 2015
Cottage Grove Retrospective
A look back at Sentinel stories from 30 and 60 years ago
Aug. 7, 1985
Downtown to
Celebrate
Downtown Cottage Grove
merchants and shoppers are
gearing up once again for the
second annual Main Street Cel-
ebraion—a community festival
designed to promote downtown
as an attractive, progressive part
of the city.
Sponsored by the Downtown
Restoration Association, this
year’s affair will be held August
10, and will open with a fun run-
promenade and will end with an
old fashioned street dance.
A special 12-page pullout
section in this week’s edition
of The Sentinel has a complete
listing of scheduled events.
“The idea for all this was re-
ally just to celebrate the efforts
of the Downtown Restoration
Committee,” says Celebration
Chairwoman Diane O’Renick.
Last year the committee hung
fl ower baskets from various
locations along Main Street,
while this year colorful banners
were added to further spruce up
downtown.
O’Renick estimates the cel-
ebration attracted about 2,000
people last year and she hopes
this year’s event will draw at
least 2,500.
She places part of her big
crowd hopes with three new
events to this year’s slate of
activities. For the fi rst time a
combination fun run and walk-
dubbed “The Celebration Race
and Promenade,” – will be held.
Other new events include a tal-
ent contest and the street dance,
which will be headlined by the
rock band “Fat Chance.”
The talent show is open to
anyone interesting in entering
one of fi ve categories-individu-
al vocal, group vocal, individual
instrument, break dancing and
miscellaneous.
Applications are available at
KNND, Uptown Printing, and
Pen and Press. The entry fee is
$1, with a grand prize of $50 to
be awarded. Top three category
POLICE BLOTTER
and crafts show, face painting
and entertainment.
“The whole idea for the Main
Street Celebration is to have a
good turnout of people from
Cottage Grove and the surround-
ing area and for everone to see
what downtown Cottage Grove
has to offer,” says O’Renick.
“Hopefully out of all this, the
downtown area will continue to
grow."
Cottage Grove Police Department 24-Hour Anonymous Tip Line: 767-0504
Aug. 3
Aug. 4
Aug. 5
Theft
A large black leather purse
was stolen from a woman at the
highway 99N Goodwill store.
The purse contained two wal-
lets, credit and debit cards, so-
cial security info, car and house
keys, and a Samsung S5 phone,
estimated value: $200.
Burglary
Subjects broke into the Econo
Clean on E. Gibbs Ave the night
before through the back win-
dow. The offi cer reported that
nothing was missing from the
business.
Theft
The caller advised police that
someone had broken into a large
trailer parked in front of the Cot-
tage Grove Yamaha on Palmer
Ave. Tools and other items were
stolen. Fingerprints were lifted
from the trailer but came back
with negative results.
Domestic Assault
Caller reported that a wom-
an assaulted her and has been
stealing items from her and us-
ing drugs at an apartment off
of Highway 99. Both the caller
and suspect were taken into cus-
tody.
Please see BLOTTER, Page 11A
CITY BEAT
Scenic bikeway
rating
City Manager Richard Mey-
ers attended his fi rst meeting
of the Oregon Scenic Bikeway
Committee on Tuesday, Aug. 4.
The meeting involved about a
30-mile bike ride on a proposed
scenic bikeway. The committee
evaluated the ride based on cri-
teria for scenic bikeways. They
will be meeting again to review
the ratings and consider the pro-
posed bikeway. Meyers is the
offi cial representative on the
committee from the League of
Oregon Cities to represent the
interest and concerns of cities
around the state.
CLIP N' CARRY
GARAGE SALES
MULTI-FAMILY
COUNTRY SALE
76658 Blue Mtn. School Rd.,
off Mosby Creek Rd.
Thurs-Fri 9am-5pm
Old books, antiques, glass-
ware, household goods,
clothes, antique cream cans,
vinyl records, Danner boots,
electric power saw, bench
grinder, 1990 Travelite 5th
wheel trailer.
winners will walk away with
$15, $10, and $5 respectively.
Finals will be at 5 p.m. on a
stage set up downtown. Main
Stree from 5th through 8th
Streets will be barricaded from
traffi c throughout the Celebra-
tion from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m.
Other events will include var-
ious sidewalk merchant sales,
four showings of “Surpressed
Desires,” by the Cottage The-
atre, a chicken barbeque, an arts
Museum painting
now complete
The brick chimney that was
part of the Cottage Grove His-
torical Society Museum at Birch
and H Streets was removed last
year by Public Works staff. The
City says the chimney had be-
come unstable and was in dan-
ger of falling. The removal of
the chimney left a hole in the
side of the building, which was
repaired using siding identical
to the original siding. Because
the chimney removal occurred
late in the year, the siding un-
derneath the chimney was not
painted to match the rest of
the building. This week, the
unpainted section of the build-
ing was primed and painted to
match the rest of the museum
structure.
5A
ESTATE SALE by Roger's
Antiques
A MUST SEE!
164 Village Drive
Thur-Fri-Sat-Sun 9-4
Antique furniture, pottery,
tools, art work, patio furni-
ture.
MULTI-FAMILY SALE
32306 Cleveland St. (by
Hillcrest Market)
Thur-Fri 10am-6pm; **Sun.
25-cent Sale**
Furniture, trinkets, Jim Beam
collection, 17" tires, nice
back-to-school clothing,
costume jewelry.
YARD SALE
2135 Patrick Court
Fri 9a-2p; Sat 8a-2p
Household, toys, camping,
cupboards, clothes, more.
YARD SALE
34771 Shoreview Dr. (4
miles east near Dorena dam)
Fri-Sat 9am-4pm
Antique pump organ, 3-
wheeler, table saw, walker,
bike, and much more!
GARAGE SALE - TWO
FAMILY
31371 Kenady Lane
Fri-Sat 9am-5pm
Antique table, iron bed,
small yellow boat, jeans,
girl's clothing and lots more!
CLEANING OUT THE
ATTIC.
ESTATE SALE
1302 Girard Ave.
Fri 9a-4p; Sat 10a-4p
Furniture, household, tools, a
lot of everything! 67 YEARS
ACCUMULATION!
GARAGE/MULTI-
FAMILY SALE
1153 LaRae Dr.
(off Holly Ave.)
Fri 9a-5p; Sat 9a-2p
GARAGE SALE
1475 Whitman (close to CG
High School)
Fri 8a-4p; Sat 8a-1p
Kid's stuff, girl's clothes,
women's clothes, plus size
women's clothes, some
building supplies, something
for everyone.
GARAGE SALE
1765 Pritchett Place
Sat. only 9am-5pm
GARAGE SALE
A whole lot of a little bit of
everything! Priced to Sell!
All gotta go!
Sat-Sun 9am-5pm
76602 Blue Mtn. School Rd.
NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE
440 N. 16th St.
Fri-Sat 8am-4pm
Chest freezer, tools, TV,
stereo, baby stuff, clothes of
all sizes.
IN CRESWELL:
CRESWELL MASONIC
LODGE MEMBERS
SALE
73 West C St., Creswell
Fri-Sat 9am-5pm
Household, kitchenware,
collectables, linens, books,
puzzles, and more.
LIVING ESTATE SALE
For Georgia “Pete” Rychard
Fri-Sat 8am-4pm
1330 Harvey Lane
Antique Hutches, Dressers,
Clocks, Dishes, Jars & etc.
Vintage Costume Jewelry,
Chicken Collection, Bird
Houses, Craft Items, Tons
of Nice Clothes $1.00 each
(small to large), Lots of
Shoes and Boots size 7.5.
Everything Must Go!
ESTATE SALE
Creswell Court, 700 N. Mill
St. #25, Creswell.
Sat-Sun 9am-4pm
O FFBEAT
Continued from page 4A
things settled down. Not much
— but enough.
Hastily the three surviving
boats were launched with a little
over half the crew on board to
row for shore. They would come
www.andreasons.com
541- 485-6659
6
-day
weather forecast
THURSDAY Aug. 13
FRIDAY Aug. 14
53° | 74°
52° | 81°
Sunny
Sunny
SATURDAY Aug. 15
SUNDAY Aug. 16
52° | 83°
52° | 84°
Sunny
Sunny
MONDAY Aug. 17
TUESDAY Aug. 18
53° | 84°
53° | 84°
Sunny
Sunny
Cottage Grove
Sentinel
www.cgsentinel.com
back 12 hours later for the rest
of them…if they could survive.
They did. When the boats re-
turned to the Shark, they found
it battered and waterlogged but
with the several dozen shipmates
(and their captain) still clinging
to the wreckage, all of them tied
to the rigging with lifelines to
keep from being swept away.
Not a single sailor was lost, or
even badly hurt. Not one — out
of a crew of more than 70 men.
When the last members of the
crew reached the beach, soaked
through and exhausted from
their ordeal, they found a great
bonfi re blazing on the sand
and their comrades all gath-
ered around it. They’d found
a great deal of driftwood clus-
tered along the beach, which
had burned very nicely. It was,
they later learned, the wreck-
age of the sloop of war Peacock,
which had come to grief on the
opposite shore of the river just
fi ve years before.
The castaways ended up stuck
on that beach for months, al-
though their British rivals from
the Hudson’s Bay Company
hastened to bring them food and
supplies. They built a log house
at Point George, which they
dubbed Sharksville, and waited
in it for a vessel that they could
charter to take them home.
But while they were wait-
ing, the barque Toulon — re-
member the Toulon? The ship
that hired the only river pilot,
and then promptly stranded on
a sandbar below Fort Astoria?
It now returned from a journey
with the news that international
negotiations between Britain
and the U.S. had resulted in a
decision to set the boundary be-
tween them permanently at 49
e
v
i
t
o
m
o
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s
e
i
t
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a
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degrees — the modern border
with Canada.
So in the end, the castaways
of Sharksville ended up being
the fi rst to hear the news. And
upon hearing it, Howison ran the
Shark’s fl ag up a makeshift fl ag-
pole, and for the fi rst time ever,
Old Glory was fl ying above the
undisputed American territory
of Oregon.
Meanwhile, the ship had
broken up, and sections of the
deck with the ship’s carronades
attached had washed up on a
nearby beach — just north of
Arch Cape. Three pieces of ar-
tillery were found, and then an-
other; one of them was dragged
out of the sand and brought up
on shore, where it stood out-
doors exposed to the elements
for more than 100 years in a
little town that was named af-
ter it: Cannon Beach. Recently,
it was sent off to the Nautical
Archaeology program at Texas
A&M University for expert res-
toration work, and the Cannon
Beach History Center and Mu-
seum is currently in the midst of
a GoFundMe campaign to raise
the $30,000 it needs to provide
a proper climate-controlled ex-
hibit space for this 190-year-old
piece of Oregon history.
In 2008, two more cannons
from the Shark were found by
a beach walker, farther to the
north; these, also refurbished
by Texas A&M, were placed on
display at the Columbia River
Maritime Museum in Astoria
last year.
(Sources: Shine, Greg P. “A
Gallant Little Schooner,” Or-
egon Historical Quarterly, Dec.
2008; Tobias, Lori. “Cannons
from USS Shark Come Back
Home to Oregon’s Coast,” Port-
land Oregonian, 16 May 2014;
http://www.gofundme.com/
ourcannon)
Finn J.D. John teaches at Or-
egon State University and writes
about odd tidbits of Oregon his-
tory. For details, see http://fi nn-
john.com. To contact him or
suggest a topic: fi nn2@offbe-
atoregon.com or 541-357-2222.
Douglas G. Maddess, DMD
FAMILY AND GENERAL DENTISTRY
Brightening Lives One Smile at a Time
PRACTICING THE ART OF TRANSMISSION REPAIR SINCE 1991
Manual & Automatic Transmission Repair
Tune ups
30-60-90K Services
Brakes, belts, hoses and cooling system
services
Muffl ers & Custom Exhaust
Drive-train repair such as clutches, u joints
and differentials
All makes and models.
MAINTAINING YOUR VEHICLE AFFORDABLY
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