The Boardman mirror. (Boardman, Or.) 1921-1925, February 01, 1924, Image 1

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    SotsonE S
11 Feb 21
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VOLUME III.
BOARDMAN, MORROW COUNTY OREGON,
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1924.
NUMBER 50.
HERE IS ALL THE FACTS EXAMINATION FOR
ABOUT INCOME TAX COAST GUARD CADETS
HOW VOl CAN HELP
February 1, Every individual who
had a net income of $1,000 or mere
during 1923, if single, or if married
and not living with husband or wife,
must file an income tax return with
Clyde G. Huntley, Collector of Inter
nal Revenue, not later than March 15
The United States Coast Guard will
hold ahold a competitive examination
for appointment of cadets and cadet
engineers comencing April 7, 1924.
This is an exceptional opportunity
for young men of the right caliber
to complete their education at Gov-
ADJUSTED COM PENS ATIOX
DEMANDS LOCAL ACTION
The American Legion of Board man We notlcG several of the en.
will hold a maps meeting at 8 o'clock ldeuilc diseases are still prevalent in
Saturday evening. Feb. 9, U,94. in different parts of the state, vis..
the auditoriumol' the schoolhouse.
Don't forget that if unmarried and eminent expense and to become com
had a net income of $1,000 or mor
missioned officers in
during the year 1923 you are requir- s,tates Coast Guard, one of
edto file an income tax return in the !,;ll'-v, service, of the Unite
office of Clyde G. Huntley, Collector
of Internal Revenue, not later
than March 15. Failure to do so
makes the delinquent tax payer lia
ble to heavy penalties. This also ap
plies w wit l . ' 8 i cadets of the line are 18 and 24 years
emption as head of a family and- for appointment of cadet en-
Aiinougn me exemption ui a uicu
measles and diphtheria. Controll of
Public speakers will brin; ip im- aumum uepenas pri
marily upon tin- ei torts of the local
health authorities. Of coarse they
must have the co-operation of the
public. Every community eventually
gets about the kind of health service
It desires. If they are satisfied with
poor service they generally get poor
srvic; if they demand good service
they generally succeed in geting this
The State Tmard of Health
portant points of the adjusted com
pensation bill Everybody urged to
the United come and express their ideas on this
the mil- subject.
ted State
HOME POINTERS
(From O. A. C. Extension Service)
in which is offered service afloat and
ashore.
I Cadet and Cadet Engineers are
trained to become line officers and
engineer officers, respectively, and i ,m, ,ik
the age limits for appointment of i uj' A,u''tu un,A 0a ... ,, kind.
will r.ot settle to the bottom of the posseses broad power in the matter
ried person whose net income for , ... . Massed his twentv-
cu,p when the beverage is served.
1923 aggregated $2,000 and did not
exceed $5,000, is $2,500, every mar
ried person must file an income tax
return if his net income was only
$2,000. If the net income of a mar
ried person last year was in excess of
$5,000 he is allowed an exemption of
only $2,000. March J 5 to the last
day for filing these returns. The
law provides heavy penalties for
those who fail to file by that time.
The federal income tax law requir
es that a single person claiming e! -emption
as the head of a family must
fourth birthday on or prior to date
: of prevention and control of com
! municable diseases. This power,
however, la of little value without
; the knowledge of when, where and
how these diseases occur. This
: knowledge is necessary in order that
, infected persons may be properly
For variety, put apoached egg on
of appointment will be ineligible for each serving of spinach instead of
appointment as a cadet of the line, , chopped hard-boiled sggS.
and one who will have passed his !
twenty-third birthday on or prior to For the winter Sunday night tea,
the date of appointment will be in- serve an oyster short cake. Make
S r spire butt;;: a ssa ,,imaU"4- " 13 i,ocessarv a!so to
Cadets and cadet engineers are : oysters between the layers and on top. e. der to TJeierniine the source of In-j
fcerve very hot. j fection, :ind ah o in order to properly j
. j handle thoje v ho have been exposed
Lett-over muffins are delicious .in order to avoid the occurrence of
other cases.
trained and educated at the Coast
Guard Academy at New London, Con.
and each summer are taken on an
extended practice cruise.
Cadets and cadet engineers receiv
file a return if his net income ia n,,, m. .nil allowances as mM
$1,000, or more, not .withstanding ine Bhipmen in -the navy($780 per annum j fast or tea.
fact that as head of a family, he is
entitled to an exemption of $2,000
and one ration per day).
Upon graduation, after three year3
as well as $400 for each dependant a the Acadmy. a cadet is commit lion
under is years ot age. income tss
returns must be filed not later than
March 15.
Every unmarried man who Is In
If you need a sleeping portion,
.! an nnsicn, and a carl- f nmrlnwr. 4ahe cul' 01 1101 wit 11 a nine
Is commissioned an ensign (engineer) I salt and pepper in it just before go-
Conrmisftioned officers of the Coast
Guard rank with officers in the Army
head of a tamiiy ana wno mm a n.-i fofavy, and Marine Corps, and receive
income of $1,000, or more, during corresponding nay and allowances,
1923 must file a return in the office ,..ldp for grade,
of Clyde G. Huntley, Collector of In- The mental examination for cadets
ternal Revenue, although ue and cadrt engineers, which will fol-1
entitled to the same exemption of jow the physical, will consume two
$2,000 allowed married persons, pro- or three days. Applicants for cadet
T,rl,an r, ,1 i t nnc.A ., ,-. A Ki,tl.,p,l n .-. A
' No matter whether you are a health :
servea very not wiin jam lor oreaa- oin,,,r a physician, a school sup. ;
lintendent, or a laymen you can help
I in the controll and prevention of dla-1
1 c-asss in jour community. If you are j
a liealth officer see that all cases in 1
, your community are promptly and j
properly reported. See that all opt a
eases are promptly quarantined, flee
I that prophylaxis Is applied to the
contacts, and search for the foci of
! infection. Check up on your loci
wheat physicians and see that they report
their cases. If yon are a physician
report your cases promptly and pro
ing to bed.
baby.
You will sleep like a
A balanced meal
bread and milk.
whole
1 ,
CO-ope rule
Your oven is hot enough for bhv ' . . ":' p : u , ' ,
eiiert-vc trnai mint . t.';ieh tbeni toob-
viding his net income does not exc en ship of the required moral character " " - Berve th.e proper quarantine m
$5,000. The bead of a family under who present satisfactoy eetificates ; your hand in the oven while jrOtt uros and do not fail to
the law is defined as a person who that they have completed the equiv- count slowly from 101 to 110. with your health officer.
supports in one household one or alent of a four year high school! If you are a school superintendent
more relatives by blood, marriage, or course and received fourteen credits' inspect your schools frequently, keep
adoption. in subjects prescribed by Head-1 lry addlnS a tablespoon each of a close watch over jour pupils, ex-
quarters will be required to take a ; chopped mind and watercress to or- elude infectious eases promptly and
What Becomes of the Railroad Dollar wrlten examination in the following dinary mashed potatoes. Serve with co-operate with yourschoolnurse and
what hecomes of the railroad dol- t subjects only tmathmetics, (algebra i,,v. ,,,,, physician. If you are a layman see
lar is interestinelv explained in Pre1-- and geometry), history and English. I I that your doctor reports
ident C.R.Gray's monthly t;nk which Those who do not present certificates
appears elsewhere -in this issue of the snowing that they have the equiva
A nice filling for a sweet sand-
I that your doctor reports his cases
! promptly. If jcu have knowledge of
communicable diseases report it to
cream to spread easily.
health officer and ask him!
Where the Railroad
Dollar Goes
Boardman Mirror. Using round fig- lent of fourteen credits, as prescribed witch is made by combining chopped tlu! health officer. Observe all quar-
ures only, 4 cents goes tor wages win ue requirea to taae an exaiuina-, dateB and nut wlth , wnippod anune measures tauniuuy
nn1 salaries 9 cents for fuel, 26 tion in the following subjects:; ' ' 6 " p " If you have any doubt call up your
cents for other operating expenses, mathematics, (algebra and geometry)
5 cents for taxes, 1 cents' for j history, English, physics or chemistry
hire of equipment and joint facility j general science, Latin or German
rents 12 cents for interest on bonds or French or Spanish, and General
and other fixed charges and 1 hi Information. A high school gradu
cents for stockholders. ates snul f able to pass the ex-
In the five years between 1917 and amination either for cadet or cadet
... t tv, oii I engineer. Those who have not at-
1922 the gross earnings of the ruii-, tonded niKh s(hool jf DOSi.ible pre.
roads increased, according to the sent certificates showing what
statement, $1,567,000,000 but, says courses of study they have pursued
Mr.Gray, this amount and more too ' and their extent.
' , m e nnn nnn in Applications to take tnis examinat-
was paid out again, $918,000,000 i" I lon shonld be filed at onoo jn orde.
added wages to railroad employes, (nat eacn candjaate may be advised
$500,000,000 in added cost of fuel, whether or not he will be required
and $122 000,000 additional for , to take the qualified examination.
, ! A mark for general adaptability
taxes, leaving none of the increase be (o a, candtdJes
for the stock and bond holders. The examination is strictly com-
"The Union Pacific System" says petetive and is open to all young
Mr Gray "is one of the most im-.men who possess the qualifications
, , tVlQ MiD j governing age, education and charac
portant enterprises west of the Mls-tor
portant enterprises west of the Mis-, Exnminat'ons will be held at llos
soui River. Its nearly 50,000 em- ton, New London, New York, Phil
h their families, constitute adelphia. Washington, Norfolk,
I""'1" ."..' Savanna
a buying power wnicn is me mam
reliance of many businesses. The
purchases of the Union Pacific
Svstem from firms located
anna. Key West, Mobile, Galves-
tou, Buffalo, Petriot, Chicago, San
franeisco and Seattle, should suffi
cent applications be designated at
on the these cities to warrant holding such
. . nvlmantttnnc onH mini, ..'I,..,. ,. 1
System, or which have otlices on our 7" i a t.
' niav tin HaltnilM
lines, aggregate millions of dollars
each month." The statement quotes
Thosce candidates who pass the
examination and are tendered ap-
Secretary Hoover's recent announc-; pointments will be required to l e
nient that "one great contribution port to the Superintendent of the
to the business stability of the past j Coast Guard Academy about three
.... u weeks after the completion of the
year has been the fact that we have examlnfttl0B and eaf.h wiM be rt,(iuir-
had a free and regular and orderly j ed to deposit with the officer the sum
movement of transportation." I of $150, to be applied to the pur-
The railways are planing to spend ; chase of uniforms and I equipment.
All candidates will be informed of
hundreds of millions of new money . Uwir slatua &s soon af(pr exam.
during 1924 to better serve the.jnation as practiable. For further
public, sajs Mr. Gray. I particulars write to the Commandant
U. S. Coast Guard, Washington, D. C.
Oregon Agricultural College, Cor
vallis, Jan. The new style book just
put out by Sigma Delta Chi, pro
fessional journalistic fraternity, for
the O. A. C. Daily Barometer, is
receiving much comment. Copies
have been sent out to- newspaper
editors of the state. The handbooks
are not only used by all Barometer
staff workers but also by a large
number of industrial journalism
students. The book contains infor
mation about writing the news story,
copjTeading, proofreading, and head
line writing. Duties of members in
each of the staff positions on the Bar
ometer are also given.
SocMum Fluoride Remedy Controls
Poultry Lice
It is hard to imagine any treatment
which would be better than sodium
1 fluoride for lice on poultry, says Dr.
I B. T. SlmniB, veterinarian of the O.A.
C. Experiment station. It poseses
i the advantages of being inexpensive,
easily applied, very efficient and
harmless when properly used.
Many pouluymen have found that
birds can be treated more rapidly at
ni-iht as they can be caught moje
ei illy at that time. Treatment con
sists of rubing a small pinch of the
powdered drug into the fluffy feath-
ers around the vent, along the inside
ers around the vent, along the inside
Miss Helen Marourger of Ro3berg,
the only co-ed in the colleee enroll, d of th thighs, under the wings, and in
in commercial engineering, heads th? . some instances along the neck. A
list of upperclass students ju.)t pledg- pound is enough to treat 500 or more
ed to Chi Epsllon. local commercial en- j fowls.
gineerlng fraternity. Seven men The use of sodium fluoride is well
were taken into the honorary at : beyond the experimental stage. Var
the same time. They are Howard ious experiment stations, the federal
Lewis of Marshf leld. Arthur Salsbury department of agriculture, and thous
of Turner, George Schmlt of Portland ands of poultrymen have found by
and Edson Burch, Wayne Denman actual experience that this Is a most
and Darwin Phillips of Corvalis satisfactory treatment for poultry lice
-Practically all the money thp vnilrnarls fcnke in is
immediately put back into circulation. Railroads
do a large volume of business on a narrow margin
of net income. Out of every dollar earned from op
eration by the railways of tlje United States, there
was absorbed in 1922, by
Wages and Salaries 44.4 cents
Fuel 9.4 "
Other operating and maintenance expenses (In
cluding such items as rails and ties, loss and
damage) 25.6 "
Hire of equipment and joint facility rents 1.5 "
Taxes 5.4 "
Net Operating Income 13.7
100.0 "
Out of this 13.7 cents of net operating income, 12.2 cents went
for interest on bonds and other fixed charges, leaving 1.5 cents for
stockholders. Adding 6.9 cents of Income from outside sources,
net corporate income was S.4 cents, of which 4.9 cents was paid
in dividends, leaving 3.5 cents available for appropriations and
surpl us
Gross earnings of the railroads in 1922 were $1,567,000,000
more than In 1917. This $1,567,000,000 and more too, was im
mediately paid out again, as follows:
9918,000,000 in IDDKD uages to railroad employes
186,000,000 in ADDED coot of coal, mostly miners' wages
122,000,000 for ADDITIONAL (axes
500,000,000 VDDITIONAL lor materials ami supplies
hugely rcprwwmtmg wag's
The stockholders and bondholders of the railroads got none of
the increase.
It is significant that good times are always coincident with
heavy buy ng on th. part of the railroads and that bad times are
periods of light railway purchase.
The Union Pacific System Is one of the most Important enterprises
west of the Missouri Itlver. Its nearly 50,000 employes, and their
families, constitute a buying power which Is the main reliance of
many businesses. The purchases of the Union I'ncliic System from
firms located on the System, or which have office on our lines,
aggregate mtllloas of dollars each month.
The railways are planning to spend hundred! of millions or MW
money during 1924 to better serve the public..
"Our transportation movement during 1923 Is tie- outstanding
Industrial accomplishment ol the year. The waste of the year
1920 with Kb car shortage. Its derangement.; of price levels,
stoppage of industry, probably amounted te not less than a
bib'.on of dollars, and the American people and no economic
fabric could have stood that loss that did not have a total
Income in excess of sixty billions One great contribution to
th business stability of tin- past year has been the fact that
we have had a free and regular and orderly movement of
transportation. " From address by Sfretary of Commerce
Herbert C. Hoover, January 9, 1924.
C. R. GRAY,
Omaha, Nebraska President.
February l. 192:4.
I N I O N PACIFIC
SYSTEM
STATE MARKET AGEXT
TALKS TO FARMERS
Every eleventh farm house in the
United States is vacant so states the
Department of Agriculture ut V.'a: 1 -ington,
D. C. It stales further that
out of the total of 1,189,000 owners
and tenant farmers more than 108,
000 have lost their farms or other
property through foreclosure or bank
ruptcy; over 122.000 have lost their
property without legal proceedings,
and nearly 373,000 have retained
their property only through tho leg
ency of creditors. i
These figures fro'n this ssonrc
should moan something to the farm- j
em of Oregon, it should warn them I
that It these conditions confir.ue that ;
the value will drop out of their land
as it did out of the German mark.
The day is gone by for making
iv.onoy in farming by buying a pie to
of land and selling it ct a pro.'lt.
The buyer today US OS cold figures and
hard estimate-.. Can he make r,h; or
seven percent interest on the price
ashed for the farm? If he cannot,
the price asked is too high, and he
will not buy it.
it i-i moat Important for farmers to
realize that if they hope ;o have their I
land worth anywhere near what thljr
paid for It,' they must put a vahe. in
that land. It is up to them to make
farming profitable in order to maka
land dettreable, This i '.ft he (lane!
in the same way that a failing maft-l
ufacturtng industry is reorganized
and put on a paying basis. There I
;unl be an organization that can sell
th" products of the farm at a fair
margin of profit.
If this organisation never went fur-1
ther than handling its product! from
the producer to the retailer. It would
make farming profitable, If It never
got a cent higher prices for products
Btan now, but tould Itself take ovrj
a large part of the middle profit.;,
farming would be profitable.
rtctail prices are high enough row
to warrant prosperous agriculture
conditions, Tim trouble is the pro
ducer dons not get the profits be
tween he and the con-mmer. Any
army of middle Intrests IP'; off the
added cost between the farm and the
home. Products go through far too
many bands. II farmers received
fair profits for their products today,
and the middle intrests added their
present profits and expellees, food
products would go to consumers at
such high prices they i ould not buy.
So, In order that this middle toll ays
teni ivrvv continue, products must be
bought at. cot:ts, or less, from the
(armor.
What the farmer must do Is to or
gan Ise again t this middle profit syn
tem, by.enk it up nnd deliver tin It
own goods. They must be their own
middle men. They RttSt handle
their goods all (he way from the farm
to the retail store.
It looks like a big undertaking and
many nre discoarged before they
start. They declare that such a
movement must be national to he ef-'e'-tive;
that it will m odlargo financ
ing and farmers are not In a posit
ion to stand the expense.
They are looking at the Wrong end
of the movement. Su- h oiganit
tions must start locally. Let the
counties organize first and when they
are organized a slate union comes
naturally, And how long would it
take to have a powerful national or
ganization if each stale would walk
Into (he movement of Uniting the
farmers of each county into strong
selling ag ncles?
if brokers, commission Interests,
peculators, wholesalers and retailers
can organize strong enough to force
farmers to sell tin lr products for less
than their prodmtion OOStS, cannot
(he producers themselves organise
Strongly enough not to sell to tliee
middle profit takers?
IMOMi; TA X IX NUTSHELL
VII? Single persons who
had Del income of 1 1,000 or
more or grosB Income of $5,-
000 or more, and married
couples who had not Income of
$2,000 or more or gross Income
of $5,000 or more must file
returns.
WHKJf? The filing period Is
from January 1 io March 15,
1924.
WHERE? Collector of Inter
nal revenue for the district In
which the person lives or has
his principal place of business.
HOW? Instructions on Form
10I0A and Form 1 040; also the
law and regulations.
WHAT, Four per rent nor-
ma! tax on the first 4,000 of
net Income In excess of the per
sonal exemption and credits for
dependents Fight per cent nor
ma! tax on balance of net In-
come. Surtax from 1 per cent
to 50 per cent on not incomes
over $0,000 for the year 1923.
The number of visitors expected
on the campus for the educational
exposition February 2 2 and 23 Is
fast reaching to the thousands. For
no other event In college , history
has the college prepared for so great
a number of guestn With the com
bination of the agricultural show,
the engineering show, the school of
commerce business show, and exhibits
from every school anil department of
the college coming at the same time
In the same mammoth show it is
thought by the committee chairman
that campus capacity will be taxed.
FARM POINTERS
l From o a. '. Uxp.rimcui (station)
Range and exercise for (he breed
ing slock are especially important
factors in the production of eggs of
high fertility and hatehabiltty.
The best treatment for poultry dis
eases is prevention. Provide com
fortable, sanitary surroundings, keep
the houses free from drafts, whole
some feed and you have reduced the
disease problem to a minimum.
Caivle?s beekeepers la the state av
eraged 10 to 15 pounds of surplus
honey per colony this year . Com
mercial beekeepers averaged 75
pounds per colony. For the entire
United States the average honey pro
duction was 39.1 pounds of surplus
honey per colony.
Potatoes for seed purposes should
be kept from extreme chilling but
stored at as low a temperature as
possible to keep them dormant until
planting time. A temperature of 30
to 38 degrees is a satisfactory storage
temperature. Potatoes effected with
soft rot can be sorted out before the
trouble spreads to other tubers.
Hatchability of eggs is determined
to a large extent by the care given
hens at this time of the year, liood
hatching Sggl can not be pro IttCed
from hens that have their healih and
vitality run down by colds and roup.
It is well lo remember thnt the qual
ity of next year's flock depends lar re
ly on the health of the bird.i during
the breeding season.
Grass seed for fall na ture v.Fl be
wanted In about eight weeks or more,
samples should be k cured now so
that the test may be made in lime.
Two-ounce sampl are tested free of
charge at the O. A. C. seed
laboratory.
The tent caterpillars that caused
much loss last year will not be so
plentiful (his season according to the
entomological staff of the Ortitjoii ex
periment station. The constan.t,-fork
of parasites is responsible for keeping
tin' caterpillars in check.
Production of orchard grass seeds
on Oregon farms Is 4 50 pounds In
stead of 4600 as an extra"nothl;'".it
end of Hie number made the ":
Pouters"last week say. The Oregon
farm lands produce 700 pounds of
rye grass seed per acre. I tot h of
thest yields are unusually good. Un
(11 Oregon farmers grow enough to
stop the 4 minion pound Importation
of these seeds annually into the Un
ited Stales, her farmers have a share
in this 6500-acre, $350,000 opport un
ity, says the experiment station.
Watch the litter at this time or tho
year and change as often hh It becom
es damp and heavy. In route local
ities it is best to change l( every ten
days. Damp litter causes the house
to be clamp, anil Is the sourse of
lunch disease.
lioekeepers are urged lo see that
the entrance to the hives are open
so I he bees may come out on sunny
days. Ily lifting the bac k end of the
MVS one Is able to determine the
amount of store s the bees have by the
weight. Tin' spring rush may be les
soned by get i ing equipment ready for
use now.
Scaly legs is caused by a parasite
which erritates at first causing a
scab. The paraslle then works It i
way under the scab causing more er-
rltatlon. Boak the effected legs with
warm soap suds and then with S
small brush remove what scule and
erUStS 80AM off easily. Next scrap"
with a dull knife and apply an oint
ment. Are you planing on using clean
ground for the chicks and growing
slock this year? The poullrytnan
who rotates his brooding runs and
uses the same ground but once In
three or four years not only ellmlnat-
es chick disease such as DOCCldlOSlS,
j but to a great extent ov r comes
I trouble with c olds, roup and chicken-
I pos when the pullets go into their
laying quarters,
Xew Farm Program Nought
Hundred of Oregon farmers from
all parts of the state met at the state
Collage In Corvallls last week and
worked out a new piogrum of farm
production, based on marketing qital
Itles as well as crop tonage. Need
for such program was stressed by
Waller M. Pierce, governor, and Dr.
W J. Kerr, president of the college.
College and federal specialists hud
gathered a vast store of facts on sup
ply and demand, which the leading
farmers In many lines considered in
arranging their new farm manuge-
nient systems.