The daily morning Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1883-1899, November 07, 1893, Image 1

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EXCLUSIVE TELEGRAPHIC PREfes REPORT.
VOL. XL, NO. 254.
ASTORIA, OREGON, TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 7, 1893.
PRICE, FIVE CENTS,
BY SAVING TIME;
YOU SAVE MONEY.
I. L. OSGOOD,
The One Price
ter and Furnisher,
Cor. Third and West 9th Sts., opp. Foard & Stokes.
WE HAVE A
School Books
To be sold at the American Book Company's price list.
-:- A Bid REDUCTION FROM LAST YEAR'S PRICES. -:-
GRIFFIN & lEED.
A CALIFORNIA JVVINE HOUSE.
fine Wines and Mqaors.
I have made arrangements for supplying any brand of wines
in quantities to suit at the lowest cash figures. The trade
and families supplied. All orders delivered free in Astoria.
JL.W. UTZIflGEl?,
Str. R. P.
Olill Leave for Tillamook Every pour Days as follows:
The steamer- R. P. Elmore connects with Union Pacific steamers for Portland and
through tickets are issued from Portland to Tillamook Bay points
by the Union Pacific Company. Ship freight
by Union Pacific Steamers.
ELHORE, SANBORN & CO., - Agents, Astoria.
UNION PACIFIC R. R. CO., Agents, Portland.
$2
FOH AN $80 LOT I
BY BECOMING A
YOU CAN GET A FIRST CLASS
IU Ab 1 UKIA. LOTS WILL BE
NOW IS THE TIME TO PROCURE
liot to Build a f4ome, for
The Packers of Choice
Columbia River Salmon
. Their Brands and Locations.
KAMP.
fcOCATION.
Astoria Pk'g : o
-Astoria...
Booth A. Pk'gCo 'Astoria.
..! j k
Cocktail
ColnmbUHIverPkKCo Astoria... .
Elmore Samuel......... Aitoria....
. I
1
George & Darker -.'Astoria.
.
J 0. Hinlhorft Co. Astoria....
j Magnolia
, I Wliite Star
J, G Metier & Co BrookfieM....
Fiherm-n'l PkgCo.' Astoria
! I Fishermen's.
' Scandinavian
i"
That is what everybody does who buy
their Men's and Boys' Cloth
ing at my a5 per Cent Re
duction Clothing Sale, also
their Hats, Capa, Boots, Shoes,
Furnishing Goods, Trun Us,
Valises, Umbrellas and Rain
Clothing at prices from. 16 to iffi
Per cent less than elsewhere.
E"A child buys as cheaplyasthe
most experienced buyer.
Clothier, Hat
FULL SUPPLY OF
and Supplies
JVIain Street, Astoria, Oregon.
EhMORE
MEMBER OF HILL'S LOT CLUBS
LOT IN HILL'S FIRST ADDITION
DELIVERED WEEKLY.
A
$2
HRAXD.
! AT
Astoria Pk'gCo.
Kinney's M.
John A. DcvIId-
J. Kinney. ....,. Astoria.
0lMini-. A. Booth & Sons CMoiro
Cutting Pkg Co gan Krsneisco
I
..'Elmore, Sanborn 4tori(l
i & Co.....
1 -
;Xmon :GeorKe Barker; .tori. ......
! J.O.Hanthorn&Co i. O. Hanthorn Astoria .
1 i I
..' tag, St. George... J. O. M.-gler r.io field Wn
I l.i
Fishermen's
FUhern'a! "C
Astoria..
NO MONEY FOR IT YET
Congress Failed to Provide the
Keady Cash.
THE COST OF REGISTERING
All the Chinese Will Probably Hand
in Their Names as Soon
as Tossible.
Associated Press. . ,
Washington, Nov. 6. Although con
Kress nas amended the Geary act so
as to allow the Chinese six months
more In which to register, It adjourned
without making any appropriation to
carry out the provoslons of the act
The chairman of the committee on ap
propriations had cognizance of the ne
cessity of the treasury department's
need of money to carry out the law.
and It la probable that If the urgency
deficiency bill hnd passed the clause
appropriating enough money at least
to begin operations would have been
inserted In the bill. As it is, the rcg
Istratlons under tljo act will not begin
until the appropriations are made
Meanwhile the Internal revenue bureau
of the treasury department will make
all Its preparations and, as soon as the
money Is available, it will be prepeared
to assign Its officers so that they. can
begin work at once. The bureau has
assurances that an effort. will be made
to get the bill through in the early
days of the session so that the work of
registration will not be long deferred.
It if said that all the Chinese now in
this country, approximating 100,000, can
he registered in 6 Odays, If they prompt
ly take advantage of the opportunity.
FIGURES PROM WASHINGTON..
Interesting! Statistics of the Work of
Various Departments. '
Washington, Nov. 6. The chief of
the bureau of statistics has issued a
statement of the Imports and exports
of the Uulted States for the nine
months ending Sept. 30, 1893. They are:
Imports. $623,331,972, and for the same
period ending September 30, 1893, . .630,
106,009. Exports, $587,040,111, and for the same
period in 1893, $653,856,620.
The statement of gold coin and bul
lion for nine months of 1893, is as fol
lows: Exports, $$76,278,514; imports,
$65,663,632. Exports and imports of sil
ver coin and bullion for nine months
of 1893 are: Exports, $33,419,714; im
ports, $15,006,254.
The treasury department figures show
430,517 Immigrants arrived in the Unit
ed States during the nine months end
ing September 30, against 476,643 ar
rived in the same period in 1892.
The annual report of the recorder of
the pension office department points
out the satisfactory operation of the
new constitution of offices. The cases
disposed of during the year numbered
203,204, and there were no cases on
hand on June 30, 1893.
THE MIDWINTER FAIR.
Beautiful Buildings Are Going up Like
a Touch of Magic.
San Francisco, Nov. 6. The progress
thus far made by contractors on the
several main buildings of ,the 'Midwin
ter Fair, is highly satisfactory. The
brick work of the art building is all
completed. The iron roof and girders
are on the premises, and, even If rain
does set in, there will be little or no
delay on the work. The mechanics
and arts building may be said to be
practically undw roof. Another week
of good weather will put the manufac
tures building under cover, so there
need be no fear that the buildings will
not. bo ready in time. The most notable
progress made during the past week
has been In connection with the admin
istration building, which has risen two
stories in height during eight days.
The various clncesslonaires are also
making rapid progress.
IS GOING INSANE.
Train Dispatcher Cannot Stand tho Re
sult of His Carelessness.
Reno, Nev., Nov. 6. It is reported
that Mnllen, the train dispatcher whose
fatal error caused the collision on the
Central Pacific last. Sunday morning
and the death of six men, is almost in
sane. He has been taken to Pyramid
Lake to avoid excitement, as It is fear
ed that his life will' be endangered by
the knowledge of the full details of the
disaster. The names of the four tramps
killed have been ascertained to be Le-
roy Norris, of Eldorado. Utah: Frank
B. Small, of Waterville, Me.; J. A.
Williams, of Portland, Or.: and G. A.
Trumbo. The coroner's inquest will be
held Wednesday. In Williams' pocket
was a paper bearing the address of J.
J. Gorman, Fourth and Washington
streets, Portland.
GOING TO OBSTRUCT.
Diver Men May Prove as Stupid as
Irish Members of Parliament.
Washington, Nov. 6. There are ru
mors that Voorhees will Introduce the
frpe rolnags of silver li!l at the open
ing of the regular session. . Voorhees
decline to talk about the matter, but
it is pointed out that he has always
been a silver man, and that he de
clared during the debate on the repeal
bill that he was no less a friend of
silver than he has always been. The
silver men say that the fight is onfy
begun. When congress assembles they
propose to keep' it well to the front
In connection with every great issue
between the parties, from the tariff
to tho repeal of the federal election
laws. Indeed, it is intended that the
silver men shall act as a body of ob
structionists as did the Farnellites in
the British parliament, till silver shall
receive a hearing.
j A SMUGGLER SHOT.
Tried to Escape from the Officers of
: j ' the Law..
Whatcom, Wash., Nov. 6. Hairy Hall
the smuggler who was arrested here
about- two weeks ago with eighteen
B-tael cans of opium in his possession,
was shot today while attempting to
make his escape from Deputy United
States Marshal McGinnis, who had
started to take him and Chin Kee
Hong to Seattle for examination before
the United States grand Jury. Hall, as
he calls himself, though admitting this
Is not his real name, was shot in the
leg and taken back to Jail. The wound
Is not dangerous, but will prevent his
removal for a few days. The man
seems to be well educated, and Is said
to belong to a good family.
A NOVEL SUIT.
Damages for Job Printing Against
Governor.
Madison, Wis., Nov. 6 Governor Geo-
W. Peck, Attorney General J. L. O'Con
nor, Assistant Attorney General J. W,
Clancy, and Colonel Clarence L. Clark,
Were made defendants today In a suit.
brought by Tracy, Glbbs & Co., a Job
printing; firm of 'this city, tOf recover
$7,500 which is part of a large sum of
money alleged to have been advanced
last summer to enable the "-Madison
Times to execute an order for printing
an edition of the roster of the Wiscon
sin soldiers, specially given it by the
governor. The Madtsoif Democrat Com
pany, the regular state printers, com
pelled the governor to cancel the order,
but the money had already ben swa'l
lowed up. The suit is brought against
the defendants on the theory that they
were all interested driectly or Indirect
ly In the Times. The suit has caused
political seneatlon.
NO VERDICT YET.
San Frailelsco, Nov. 6. At 4 o'clock
this, afternoon the case of Nellie Hor
ton, charged with the murder of Chas.
liaguns, a telegraph operator, was giv
en to the Jury. At the close of the
trial Miss Horton again went into a
fit of hysteria, becoming so bad that
Judge Wallace would not send her back
to tho county Jail, but ordered the pris
oner to be given into the custody of
her sister, Mrs. Cummlngs, to be cared
for. At 10 o'clock the Jury was still
out, and Miss Horton was at her sis
ter's house under guard of a policeman.
POSTMASTERS APPOINTED.
Washington, Nov. 6. The president
has reappointed a number of postniast-
ers wha failed of confirmation. Among
them is H. Erunk, of Ashland, vice A.
Hammond, removed.
, A NIGHT OF TERROR.
At a station on the Louisville and
Nashville last winter the station-keeper
had an exciUng time. It wao midnight,
and the station being In a deserted
art of the country, had been left by
the loafers. It began to rain. The
station-keeper was not sleepy and de
termined to sit up the greater part of
the night, especially as he had an un
usually large sum of money in his cash
drawer, . and he felt uneasy about it.
Robberies of stations and farmhouses
down the line had been frequent. So
he settled himself -down to a vigil.
As he felt hungry he took a can of
cove oysters down from the shelf and
and set it on the stove." A moment
after there was a knock at the door,
and he admitted a cold, drenched
tramp, whom, he allowed to lie down
by the fire. ' Just then a train came
around the bend and the station-agent
stepped outside to display the go-ahead
signal. He felt distrustful of the tramp
and feared that he would fool with
the money drawer. As the train pass
ed he hurried Into tjie room and had
scarcely opened the door and seen the
tramp standing by the stove with some
thing glistening In his hand, when there
was a report and the agent felt a
(.tinging sensation over the eye.
Although blinded with blood from
the wound, he drew his pistol and fired
five times into the room. He then dash
ed around to the rear of the station and
Md under the platform. After an hour's
time he crawled out, resigned to the
loss of his -money, and thankful that
he had escaped with his life. . The
room was dark. the fire was out. The
tramp had evidently escaped with his
booty. Sorrowfully, the agent lit a
match, but instantly dropped it when
a startling sight met his eyes. He lit
another one, found a candle, and gazed
about at the scene of desolation. The
lamp had been shattered by a bullet.
A cheese had been perforated with two
bullets. The room was filled with
smoke from the stove pipe, which a
fourth bullet had perforated. Strang
est of all, the room was filled with cin
ders, and oysters frescoed everything.
Oysters, oysters, cove oysters. The
agent gasped and realized it all. The
can had remained on the stove too
long, and being sealed up, had explod
ed from the steam when the tramp
poked the fire. Of course the tramp
skipped when the shooUnar oomnviiml.
The cash drawer whs intact. A piece
of tin was found near the door, where
it had recoiled off the agent's fare.
The sgent spont the remainder of the
night In mending Uie stove door.
The Secretary's Bold Ideas on
the Situation.
WILL NOT COIN SEIGNORAGE
Thoroughly in Accord with Cleve
land in His Views about
Finances.
Associated Press.
Washington, Nov. 6. The treasury
department today hnd an actual work
ing balance not to exceed $2,000,000. If
this becomes exhausted, the department
will have to meet current obligations
from the gold reserve. The treasury
officials, however, hope for better times
and believe that further loss will be
stopped. It. Is predicted that the pres
ent coinage of gold between now and
January 1st, will amount to $20,000,000.
New York, Nov. 6. Mr. Carlisle, sec
retary, of the treasury arrived hero this
morning. He declined to sny anything
In relation to the financial situation,
or to express any opinion as io the out
look. In reply to a question from a
reporter for the Evening Post, Carlisle
said that he had not Issued any order
directing the mints 0 coin tho silver
bullion in the treasury, or any part of
it.
"What I have done is Just this," said
Carlisle. "We could use a few more"
sliver dollars, and I therefore directed
the mints to get ready to coin bullion
when It was deemed advisable to do
so. It would take more than five years
to coin all the silver bullion now in the
treasury. If we should begin to coin
It the sclgnorage would in round fig
ures amount, to more than $1,000,000 a
month. With the certainty that the
purchases of silver bullion will be stopp
ed, we can probably uso the silver to
advantage. I should be sorry therefore
to see any law passed, as was recently
suggested, that we set uslde that -por
tion of the bullion that would become
sclgnorage und culn It alone and ut
once and thus add to the- treasury
available cash. It we did that, I think
the coin would come back to us In a
way we should not dislre to se?. Some
thing should be left to the discretion
of the secretary. Tho law at present
Invests him with the authority to coin
such of the sliver bullion as may be
necessary lor the redemption or treas
ury notes.
A DESPERATE DUEL.
Spokane, Nov. 6. A duel was fought.
last evening In the Selkirk saloon at
Colvllle. Two miners, McDonald, for
merly a bar-l;eo:er, und H '.;rlintr n,
who hid started the feud while at work
in the Bonanza mine, fought out theli
differences. Eight shots wero exchang
ed. McDonald was shot in the abdo
men and will probably die. Harrlngt.in.
got a ball in the right thigh, Both
the wounded men were brought to the
hospital here tonight.
TEMPORARY COMMISSIONS.
Washington, Nov. 6. The president
has Issued temporary commissions to
a number of his nominees who failed
of confirmation by the senate so that
they can perform the duties of the
offices pending the reassembling of
congress. Among th?ni are Robert K.
Preston, director of tho mint, and 1.
G. Browne, collector of customs for tiie
district of Montana and Idaho.
MURDERED FOR GOLD.
Oklahoma City, Nov. 6. A negro
named Clark, his wife, and daughter,
were found in a cabin In the country
today with their throats cut and their
skulls crushed in. Mrs. Clnrk Is dead
and the others cannot live. Tho deed
was done Ivy John Mulligan, a negro,
who lived with th?m. His purpose was
robbery.
CASH FOR IIIS SERVICES.
San FronclBco, Nov. 6. -Fred Shultz,
who furnished tho government officials
with Information lending to the seizure
of 500 boxes of opium, on the steamer
Romulus, has been awarded $1,000 by
Judge Morrow.
WHAT IT SIGNIFIES. .
Washington, Nov; 6. The elections
throughout the country are awaited
with great Interest by public men in
this city, who see in them an indica
tion of the result of the presidential
Highest of all in Leavening Power. Latest U. S. Gov't Report
election In 1896. Politicians look upon
the election not as being an endorse
ment of the democratic party or a re
buke, but a3 an Indication of public
feeling. Viewed from a Washington
standpoint, the elections are interesting
as presenting the thoughts of the peo
ple on multifarious questions without
involving any fresh political signlll-cance.
STRIKERS IN MARSEILLES.
Marselles, Nov. 6. The employes of
the street car lines are on strike for
more wages and fewer hours. They
began rioting yesterday andfontlnued
today, aided and abetted by many citi
zens. Mobs hive overturned many cars
which the companies attempted tc run,
saturated them With ' kerosene and
burned them. They also tore up the
tracks and absolutely blocked traffic
In some of the principal streets. The
police are powerless, and it is thought
It will be necessary to send soldiers to
disperse tho mob.
MORE TROUBLE IN THE CAMP.
Chicago, Nov. 6. The democratic mi
nority of the city council met in spe
cial session this morning ?tr the pur
pose of elccMng a mayor pro tern, to
succeed tho late Mayor Harrison. No
republican:! attended, and the demor
eralB Instructed the pergeant-at-arms
to bring them In at S p. m., to which
lime an ndjournment was taken. Al-
dermun Swift, republican, claims to
h.'ivo been elected at 3aturdiy's special
meeting.'
WILL NOT LET THEM GO.
Njw York, Nov. 6. It is believed
here that the vessels bought by the
Brazilian government will not bo al
lowed to leave port on the ground that
they are manned by American sailors
hired for the express purpose of going
to Brazil to fight. This Is contrary to
the United States laws.
A NOBLE ANIMAL DEAD.
Louisville, Nov. . Longfellow, king
of the turf, is dead. Ills death occurred
at Lexington. He was foaled 26 years
ngo, and died of old age. He was the
greatest race-horse of his time, and
tueamo the progenitor of the most fd-
t.niiH line of turf performers in the hiu-
t y of this country.
AN ERRAND OF MERCY.
New . York. Nov. . The . "World's"
ipcelul Southern relief train consisting
f eleven freight car hiads of provis
ions contributed by tho generous peo
ple of New York and vicinity for the
sufferers at Brunswick, Ga., and the
Sea Islanders, left Jersey City tonight.
THE. ROAD TO RUIN.
Dallas, Tex., Nov. 6. Charles Martin,
he wealthiest young man in the city,
shot and killed his mistress, Hattte
Cole, -today, and then killed himself.
A BIG FAILURE.
Londjn, Nov. 6. An examination ln
the aecounls of Hallet & Co., navy
agents and bankers, shows that their
llaMlilk'j are nearly four million dol
lars. Several of the royal princes and
.1 1st of the prominent naval officers
...ng the unsecured creditors.
THE SWIPESVILLE BOOM.
The editor of the Swlpesvllle Boom
thus disported himself last week:
The Boom is on the highroad to that'
substantial success which so becomes
a Journal of civilization and progress.
Two years ago we hadn't a shirt to our ,
back and now we own two.
The egg that our well-known citizen
and subscriber John Bllggln laid on
cur table last week will never be hatch
ed. ' It was bad. Come again John.
We tender our thanks the the Ladles'
Aid Society of Swlngtown for a loaf
of home-made bread they sent us this
week. We have bored a hole in - it
and Inserted a handle, and find It use
ful as a mallet In making up our forms.
We are thankful our wife wasn't born
and raised In Swlngtown.
There was a dog light In Pewter alley
Wednesday evening and everybody ex
cept two old ladles got to prayer meet- '
Ing lata. Wednesday evening Is the
wrong time for prayer meeting.
That political hustler, Sam Melton,
was in town last week looking over the
legislative Held. Mr. M. subscribed , for
the Boom. We need such men ns Hon.
Samuel Melton- to guide the ship of
state.
Our fellow townsman, Dr. Billings,
amputated the leg of the man who was
Injured three days ago in the sawmill
with most satisfactory results, as the
doctor always does.
Our young friend Tom Spnngle be
came the huslutnd of Miss Birdie Smith
of Smith's Run, on Tuesday of last
week. Miss Smith In worth $10,000 in
her own right and Tomwell, Tom is
the luckiest man In. the county.
The report that we are about to get
a steam press lacks foundation In fact.
The Boom will still continue to be hand
made. Now is the time to subscrll)e.
niv rain
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