The Daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1876-1883, September 11, 1883, Image 1

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    Vol. xix.
Astoria, Oregon, Tuesday Morning, September 11, 1883
No. 139.
EV ART'S ADDRESS
At the Completion of the N- P.R. R.
Ex-Secretaiy Win. M. Evarts
delivered the address at the driv
ing of the last spike near Helena,
Montana, on the Sth inst. He
said:
Jfr President Villard and
(rcntlrneH, our Felhiccitizens and
Foreign G'kch&c shall find it
easy to conform, for my share of
it, to the distribution of the entire
time which has been accorded for
this striking ceremony, to mark
the date and place of the completion
of this great public work. Your
own address of welcome, Mr.
President, has called to attention
the principal step and methods by
which this noble consummation has
been reached, and the eminent
gentlemen who are to follow me
will illustrate, from every point of
view, the magnitude of the achieve
ment, and give eloquent utterances
to sentiments of admiration for the
great qualities and congratulation
upon the fortunate influences
which have secured the result
sentiments whioh I see, as 1 look
around me, swell every breast and
brighten every eye. Indeed, I am
very glad to feel that thus placed
between what has conn before
and what is to come after, in
short speech may be fairly treated
as a mere parenthesis, which, the
grammarians tell us, ma' always
be omitted without injuring the
sense.
It is true, if were to make the
very briefest allusion to the mani
fold interesting incidents, if I
were merely to touch upon even
the many great things which have
marked the progress of this enter
prise through all its vicissitudes to
its final success, if I were to ex
hibit only its most notable con
tests with and triumphs over the
difficulties and obstacles which
nature human, alas! as well as
material 3iad "put in its way, I
should trascend all limits of time
and your patience before I got as
far as Helena, starting at either
end. But of such enlargement,
even, the subject has no need. In
all the long route from St. Paul to
Portland and Puget Sound, the
work has spoken and will speak
the praise of its conception, its pro
jection, its completion, in more
impressive tones, ana witn a
juster emphasis, than words
could express. If I can only run
a single furrow through the wide
field of observation and illustra
tion open before us, if 1 can barely
mark the bright track of prophecj,
faith and works which have
wrought out the grand consumma
tion, the demands of the occasion,
I cannot but feel, will be quite
satisfied.
I have spoken of prophecy, faith
and works as all contributory to
the success of this enterprise,
and so, indeed, they have been.
Neither of them could have been
spared from this, or from anv
weighty and imposing task of
human endeavor. Forecast, con
fidence and labor will accomplish
whatever is within the compass of
man's power. Let us consider a
little the part they have each
played in the work complete,
which now, in our presence, its
builder, the Northern Pacific Rail
road company, has "crowned with
its last hand.
Fortuately for us, neither Eng
lish nor Spanish explorers of the
west coast had discovered the
mouth of the Columbia river be
fore our independence was estab
lished. Fortunately, also, after
that event, though both the Eng
lish and the Spaniards continued
their explorations Qn that coast, it
was a Xew Eugland trading cap
tain, Robert Gray, of the ship
Columbia, that first penetrated
the mouth ol this river, to which
he gave its name, and verified and
recorded it as a discovery which,
under the rules then prevailing,
carried to this country the sover
eignty of the region drained by
the river and its tributaries. The
accurate and circumspect entry
made in his log book by this in
telligent New England shipmaster,
was the title deed of the United
States to the region embraced in
the state of Oregon and the terri
tory of Washington against subse
quent claims of discovery made by
Great Britain, and, in some sort,
by Spain. It- was under this title
that we maintained a footins: of
joint occupation with Great Brit
ain, and, finalh, by the treaty of
ISiG, of exclusive title up to the
division line of the 49th parallel
By the treaty of Washington of
1871, under the arbitration of the
Emperor of Germany, our con
struction ot the division Jine in
Puget's Sound and the communi
cating channels was established.
Until the acquisition of California,
as the result ol the .Mexican war,
this res-ion was our sole footing
upon the Pacific ocean, and
this excited ihti interest and
ambition of the Nation
for an overland communication
with this remote and unpeopled
possession. Immedia tely upon
the Louisiana purchase in 1S03,
the forecast and energy of Jeffer
son was shown in the project of
the survey of the v;ist wilderness
intervening to discover a practi
cable route for migration and
traffic. Congress voted the money
for an expedition to trace the
Missouri to its source, to cross the
highlands, and to follow down the
water courses to the Pacific ocean.
Lewis and Clarke executed this
task. Starting from St. Louis in
May, 1S04. they wintered fifty
miles above the present town of
Bismarck, and came in sight of the
ocean on the 7th of November?
1S05. Commencing their return
March, 1S0C, they reached St.
Louis in September of the same
year. Thus, under the instruc
tions drawn by the hand of Jeffer
son himself, the route now occu
pied by the Northern Pacific rail
road was opened to the attention
of the people of the United States,
and has from time to time engag
ed their interest, till the dream,
the prospect, the project and the
effort have ended in the work here
and now. Henceforth the transit
from the Mississippi to the mouth
of the Columbia and the return,
will be made in nine days for the
round trip, which occupied the
first explorers two years and a
half.
The prophecy and advocacy
of a railroad to our Pacific coast
possession, to the Columbia river
and to Puget Sound, followed
close upon the first introduction in
this country of this system of traf
fic and travel. As early as 1834,
when the arrival or departure of a
railroad train had still something
of novelty even in Boston, a vil
lage physician in western Massa
chusetts, Dr. Samuel Barlow, the
father of Mr. Barlow of New York,
well known on both sides tho At
lantic as an eminent solicitor,
pressed upon the. attention of his
countrymen, in articles showing
great forecast and sagacity, the
vast imjortance and the clear
feasibility of such an enterprise as
that whose completion wc this
day celebrate. He writes in 1837:
"My feeble pen would fail me to
expatiate on the substantial time
enduring glory which would re
dound to our nation should it en
gage in this stupendous under
taking." Dr. Parker, a distin
guished missionary to the Oregon
Indians, who had repeatedly trav
ersed the route, in 1S33 to 1835,
asserted that there was no more
difficulty in such a railroad than in
one between Boston and Albany,
and prophesied that the time was j
not far distant when tours would
be made across the continent as
they were then made to Niagara.
Willis Gaylord Clark, in 1833, in
an eloquent exposition of the sub
ject in a leading magazine, assev
erated that "the reader is now
living who will make a railroad
trip across this vast continent"
Penetrated with this feeling, the
missionary, Whitman, in 1S42,
started on a winter journey to
Washington across the Rocky
mountains, to awaken the state
department to the movements go
ing on, in British interests, to
alienate from us our Oregon pos
sessions. Under this impulse di
plomatic negotiations were pushed
and guided till the treaty of 184G
drew the boundary line between
the two nations, and terminated
the joint possession. Thus, all
the instincts and aspirations for
this transcontinental connection
fastened themselves upon this
northern route. The spread of
knowledge and zeal in the hearts
of our countrymen had to do with
this project and no other.
But the acquisition of Califor
nia, the discovery of its till then
hidden gold, the absorption of
people and government in the ter
rible struggles between freedom
and slavery for the occupa
tion of our new domain, and final
ly the civil war, aroused new mo
tives and new arguments which
urged irresistibly the transconti
nental connection, but diverted
the first compliance with the po
litical, military and popular exi
gencies from the northern to the
southern and central routes. Thus
once more in human affairs, the
last was made first, and the first
last. During this period,. howev
er, the agitations of the subject
before congress and in public
meetings by Asa Whitney, the
convention at Chicago in the
spring of 1849, and at St Louis in
the fall of that year, the vehement
and persistent propagandism of
Josiah Perham, all had to do with
this northern route, and the feel
ing thus awakened and developed
with this object, were, no doubt,
easily transferred to the service
of the other routes, when para
mount motives gave them the pre
cedence. In 1S53 congress made appro
priations for the exploration and
survey of all the proposed routes,
and a valuable and adequate expo
sition of the northern pathway
across the mountains was secured.
The survey from the east under
the charge of Govenor Stevens,
and from the west conducted by
Captain McClellan, met near the
point where we now stand, and
these surveys have furnished the
basis upon which the calculations
and combinations, corporate and
financial, ever afterward proceeded,
till the point was reached when
actual construction needed to be
provided for.
On the 2d of July, 1SGJ, the
bill for the construction of the
Northern Pacific railroad was
signed by Abraham Lincoln. The
enthusiasm of Perham, which
anticipated a rush of his country
men that would bring, if need be,
a million subscribers for $100 of
tho stock apiece, induced the in
sertion of a clause in tho act pro
hibiting either the issue of bonds
or the creation of a mortgage in
the aid of the construction. This
financial folly, and much time and
labor spent in trying to obtain
from congress a very moderate aid
by tho government, in the shape
of a guaranty of interest for a lim
ited period, held the whole enter
prise in abeyance till, in 1870, the
obnoxious section was expunged
from the act, and some other ben
eficial provisions inserted, and the
company took the resolution to
build the road on the faith that
capital would show in the enter
prise itself, and in the prospective
value of tho government land
grant should the construction be
carried through.
Perham's popular subscription
having proved wholly abortive, his
organization of the company was
transferred to one made up in
New England in December, 18G5;
of which Governor J. Gregory
Smith of Vermont, became the
president. The financial agency
of the enterprise was offered to,
and after careful examination arid
a new survey, was accepted by
the eminent bankers, Jay Cooke
& Co., then in their highest repute
from their wonderful administra
tion of the immense treasury trans
actions in the issue and distribu
tion of the bonds of the United
States.
The wisdom of the selection of
this eminent financial agency, and
the immense enginery at its com
mand, were quickly demonstrated.
During the years 1870 and 1871
the company received nearly 30,
000,000 from the saie of its bonds
conducted by Jay Cooke & Co.,
and the money was rapidly ap
plied to the actual building of the
road. The source of supply, how
ever, proved not to be perennial
nor inexhaustible, and the compa
ny was pressed for funds, ::i thn.
summer of 1S72. A change then
took place in the presidency. The
financial outlook for the enter
prise became less and less encour
aging, till this gloom spread over
all our affairs, and the general
panic of 1873 swallowed up the
company and its financial agents
in the common insolvency. But
this brief period of plenty and
prosperity was well employed.
Never was the prudence of mak
ing hay while the sun shines more
clearly illustrated. In this period
the road was built from the east to
the Missouri river and on the west
between Columbia river to Puget
Sound. Upon this firm basis, as
the 2)0U st Archimedes, the
skillful engineers of the compa
ny's present prosperity have lifted
the heavy globe from the cata
clysm in which it was engulfed,
till now it blazes upon our eyes,
"lolus in seijxto, ters, atqur rolun
dus." General Cass succeeded Gover
nor Smith as president, and skill
fully nursed the energies of the
enterprise during the inglorious
period of its eclipse. He became
its receiver upon the decree of
bankruptcy in 1S75, and, through
the actual cautery of foreclosure
and sale, the property became
vested in the present reorganiza
tion under the honest, generous,
substantial and successful scheme,
of conciliation between the disap
pointed interests of the past and
the hopeful interests of the future,
known as the "Billings" plan.
This eminent gentleman, who
unites the unusual distinctions of
credit as a lawyer among lawyers,
and a financier among financiers,
became a director in tho company
in 1S70, and has continued in its
management ever since, succeed
ing Mr. Wright, of Pennsylvania,
in 1879, and succeeded by Mr.
Villard in 1SS1, as president, af
ter a temporary occupancy of the
place by Mr. Barney. As Mr.
Billings dates his connection with
the company from before the del
uge, he will be able to correct the
impressions of any who, in the
glorious sunshine of to-day's pros
perity, may imagine it was not
much of a shower.
The restoration, however, of fi
nancial confidence and strength,
was by no means immediate or
unchecked. The preferred stock
after the reorganization com
manded only twenty-five or thirty
cents on the dollar in Wall street,
and at one time fell to SS a share,
and the common stock to 1.50.
Appeals to. congress to aid its se
curities by guaranty of interest
were again resorted to and again
refused. But in the meanwhile
the good management of the frag
ments of completed road showed
net earnings of some- 300,000 in
187G, and some S500,000 in 18? S.
This kept alive the organization
and confirmed confidence. The
meritsiof the route and the value
of the lands when the road should
bo finished were courageously re
lied upon by the experienced and
able men who put their own for
tunes in tho enterprise, to attract
the confidence of capital and give
credit to the bonds and value to
the stock of the road.
And, now, the flood of the tide
of financial prosperity of the
whole country floated this enter
prise which its ebb lias left strand
ed. The resumption of specie
payments by the government in
1879, the rapid conversion of the
public debt into 4, 4, 3A- and 3
per cent, securities, the rapid re
duction of the debt itself, set at
liberty great amounts of capital
for participation in thG active em
ployment of money. These stu
pendous transactions of the treas
ury at once compelled and attract
ed immense investments in well
founded enterprises of industry
Continued on 2nd Page.
PESmIeIeDI!
RHEUMATISM.
Neuralgia, Sciatica, Lumbago.
Backache, Soreness of iho Chest,
Gout, Quinsy, Sore Throat, Swell'
ings and Sprains, Burns and
Scalds, General Bodily
Pains,
Tooth, Ear and Headache, Frosted
Feet and Ears, and all. other
Pains and Aches. .
Ko Preparation on earth cqcah Sr. Jacob Oil
fti a safe, sure, simple and cheap External
Cemedjr. A trial en tills but the awparatlTdly
trifling outlay of 50 Cents, and erery ons suffer
ing with pain an Imo cheap and padtiro proof
of iU claims.
Directions in Keren language.
BOLD BY ALL DETJG GISTS A2D DE ALEB3
in HEDiorrrs.
A VOG-EIER & CO.,
Ualtlmore, 2Sd., V. S. A.
Sat i
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varies. A marvel o
purity, strensth and wholesomeness. More
ecouomic-il than the ordinary kinds, and
cannot K sold in competition with the iurI
liiiuie ol low test short weight, alum or
ihoiluue powders. Soldoriluin cans. Roy
AI.IlAKl.VO rnwDKK Co.. 10G Wall-st. N. Y.
A LETTER FROM GERMANY.
; t ; ks, January 9, 1SS2.
Very tutPt-ituiI sirs:
The praise your IJvor Pi 11k hnve called
f.rth here Ik wonderful. After taking one
and a hsilf loxes of your genuine DIt. C.
2IcX.AXn,3 HVK1L 1'IL.LS, I have en
tirely recovered from my four years suflbr-i:-r.
AH who k-Mjw me wonder how I,
who, for so many years, had no appetite,
aud could not sleep for backache, stitch
in my side, and general stomach coin
pinints, could have recovered.
An old lady in our city, who has suuered
for many years frmn kidney disease, and
the doctors hail given her up, took two of
your Pills, and got more relicr than she
lis; from all the doctors. Yours trulv.
J. VON DKR HERO.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.
The genuine are never sugar-coated.
Kvery 1kx has a red wax seal on the lid,
with .the Impression: McLano't Liver
Pill.
The genuine aicIiAXE'S LlVP'It
I'lT.I-S bear the signature of C. McLme
and Flemiiig-Hros. on the wrappers.
Insist upon having the genuine DIt. C.
SIcIiAXE'S X.IVER nixs, prepared by
Fleming Bros., of Pittsburgh, Pn., the
market being full of imitations of tho
name McLnne, spelled differently, but of
sumc pronunciation.
If your storekeeper does not have tho
Cfl n Hi no IIt. C. McIuVXE'S CKLE
lJltATEU LIVER P1IXS, send us 25
cents, and wc will send you a box by mail,
and a set of our advertising cards.
FLEMING BROS., Piltsunrgli, la.
MAGNUS C. 0R0SBY,
Dealer lu
HARDWARE, IRON, STEEL,
Iron Pipe and- Fittings,
PLUMBERS AND STEAM FITTERS
Goods and Tools,
SHEET LEAD STRIP LEAD
SHEET IRON TIN AND COPPER,
Stoves, Tin Ware and House
Furnishing Goods.
JOBBING IN SHEET IRON, TIN. COP
Irk v&.C?i
.A
mi
S3, HIM
11 W
PER PLUMBING and STEAM FITTIUC
Done with neatness and dispatch.
None but first class workmen employed.
A large assortment or
SCALE?
Constantly on hand
WILLIAM HOWE
-DEALER IX-
Doors, Windows, Blinds, Transoms, Lumber.
All kind of
OAK LUMBER, J
SSrS
Boat ftlaterial, Etc.
j Boats of all Kinds Made to Order, j
"Orders from a distance promptly attended to, and satisfaction guaranteed In all cases
S. AKNDT & JFERCBEN,
ASTORIA. - OREGON.
The Pioneer Machine Shop
DLACKSMITH
sun T
Boiler Shop
All kinds of
ENGINE, CANNERY,
STEAMBOAT WORK
Promptly attended to.
A specialty made of repairing
CANNERY DIES,
FOOT OF LAFAYETTE STREET.
ASTORIA IRON WORKS.
Bentox Street, Near Paukkh House,
ASTORIA. - OREGON.
GENERAL MACHINISTS AND
BOILER MAKERS.
LAHDaiMAEffiEIrIM
BoilerWork, Steamboat Work
and Cannery Work a spe
cialty. Of all Descriptions made to Order
at Short Xotlo.e.
A. D. Wass. President.
J. (J. HusTiiKR, Secretary,
J. V. Cask, Treasurer.
joux Fox.Superintendent.
LOEB & CO.,
JOBBERS IN
WINES,
LIQUORS,
AND
CIGARS.
AGENTS FOR THE
Best San Francisco Houses and
Eastern Distilleries.
Tumblers Decanters, and AH
Kinds of Saloon Supplies.
EgrAH goods .sold at San Francisco Trices.
MAIN STREET,
Opposite Parker House, Astoria, OreRon.
BUY THE BEST !
BARBOUR'S
Irish Flax
Salmon Met Threads
Woodberry, and Needle Brands,
SEINE TWINES.
AND
COM 1KB LEAD LIKES,
Fish Pounds, HeineB, and A'ets
Imported to Order. A.
Larp Stoefcof Netting, lishLiBes
AND FISH HOOKS.
CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
HENRY DOYLE & CO.,
5 1 7 and 5 1 9, MARKET STREET
SAN FRANCISCO.
JSTVA-gents for tho Pacific Coast.
FOARD & STOKES,
WE HAVE OPENED AGAIN
In Hume's J,eTBuiIduiff,
And are Seady to Supply
the "Wants of Our
Customers.
A FULL STOCK
OF
Fresh Groceries.
AND
Bracket Work
A SPECIALTY.
BUSINESS CAHDS.
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Rooms 5 and C. Odd Fellows Buildins.
i V. AL1I.1EX,
Astoria Agent
Hamburg-Magdeburg
and German-American
TIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES.
.NOTARY PUBLIC,
AUCTIONEER, COMMISSION AND IN
SURANCE AGENT.
JAY TUTTLE, 31. I.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Offick Rooms 1, 2, and 3. Pythian Build
ing. IlRsiDENCE-Over J. E. Thomas' Drug
Store.
Q.ELO F.
SURVEYOR OF
Clatsop County, and City or Astoria
Office :-Chenamu3 street, Y. M. C. A. hall
Room No. 8.
jp P. IIIOXS,
PENTIST,
ASTORIA, - - - OREGON
Roonuj In Allen's buildlnp up stairs, comer
f Cass aud Sqemocqhe stret .
J l.ABO'LBY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Chenamus trecr, - - ASTORIA, OREGON
J J.JOXES,
STAIR BUIIBEK,
Ship and Steamboat Joiner,
jytt. J. K. LaFORCE,
IFJVTIST,
Room II. Odd Fellows Building, ABtorin. Or.
Gas administered for painless extraction
of teeth.
Q J. CUltTIS,
ATTT AT LAW.
Notary Public, Commissioner of Deeds for
California, New York and "Washington Ter
ritory. Rooms 3 and 4. Odd Fellows Building, As
toria. Orecon.
N.H.-Claims at "Washington. D. C, and
collections a specialty.
GEO. P. YTII E E LE K. VT. L. ISOBB.
WHEELER & ROBB.
GENERAL
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, AND
COLLECTION AGENTS.
Real Estate bought and sold on Commis
sion. Accounts adjusted and Bills collected.
Correspondence from abroad solicited.
JSy-Offlce in Hume's new building, on Sque
moqua street, next door to Foard & Stokes.
GEHERAL STEAMSHIP AGENCY.
Bills of Exchange pn any
Part oi Europe.
I AM AGENT FOR TIE FOLLOWING
A well known and commodious steamship
ines, STATE LINE, JtED STAR,
WHITE STAR,
HAMBURG-AMER ICAN,
DOMINION LINE,
NATIONAL, and AMERICAN LINE.
Prepaid tickets to or from any European
port.
For full Information as to rates of fare,
sailing days, etc, apply to
I. "W. CA SE.
EOZORTH & JOHNS.
Real Estate and General Insurance
Agents.
ASTORIA,
Oregon.
WE WRITE POLICIES IN THE "WEST
ern. State Investment, Hamburg, Bre
men and North German Fire Insurance Com
panies, and represent the Travelleis Life
and Accident of Hartford, and the New
York Life, of N. Y.
We have tho only complete set of township
maps in the county, andliave made arrange
ments to receive applications, filings, and
final proofs on Homesteads, Preemptions,
Timber Lands, etc.. having all the official
blanks therefor. Our maps can be exam
ined in the office, upon the payment ofu
rtOAmiahlc fee.
"We also have for sale city property in As
toria and additions, and farms and tide land
property.
Rents, and other collections made, and
loans negotiated.
BOZORTH& JOHNS,
PLUMBING,
Gas and Steam Fitting
DONE BY RUDDOCK & "WHEELER. AT
fair rates. Also a complete stock of
goods In our line. Estimates given and
work guaranteed.
Cass street. In rear of I O O F building,
next to Gas Co's office.