The Daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1876-1883, March 20, 1883, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    Ci)
ft.
vdT
.i
.t
lJLiK.
Vol. XYIII.
Astoria, Oregon, Tuesday7 Slorning, March 20, 1883.
To. 145.
WHITMAN'S OLD WAGON.
The Oregon question finally
turned on wheels. Even Web
ster arid Asjfbnrton; the high con
tracting parties to settle the inter
national boundary on the north
from ocean to ocean, could carry
the line of division no farther west
than-the Rocky mountains. Their
diplomacy, civil engineering and
the two nations all concerned
had to wait for the wagons. The
taking of one through overland to
the Columbia, bj' Dr. "Whitman,
was the most important act in all
preliminaries in the settlement of
Oregon-controversy. At first only
two parties took a proper view of
a wagon for Oregon Marcus
"Whitman and the Hudson Bay
company. In 1836 there at Fort
Hall and Fort Boise, it, with its
two women, suggested to the
company, the family and civilized
home and permanent settlement in
Oregon, and a highway from the
Missouri to that settlement that
others could follow. The com
pany, therefore, determined to
turn the wagon back or direct it
to California, or stop it absolutely.
Dr. "Whitman took the same view
of the wagon, and therefore con
cluded to take it through to Ore
gon. But we must go- back a
little in the story.
"When the fur traders and the
missionary party arrived at Fort
Laramie, it was assumed, as a
matter of course, that all wagons
and carts, would, as usual, be
abandoned, as it was thought im
practicable to proceed further
with them. The doctor had been
brought up in New England
whefe.there is m,uch antagonism
between wheels and mountains,
and he had been educated to over
come it. He was not,therefore,dis
posed to give up to the Rocky
mountains. He objected to the
abandonment of the wagons. The
doctor had purchased two for the
party at Liberty on the Missouri,
and now it seemed very desirable,
on account of the ladies, to' take
along at least two of them. There
was much discussion over it be
tween the missionaries and the
traders, and, finally, the latter
consented to make the experiment,
and at the same time added one of
their cattle to the mission wagon.
Dr. "Whitman was put in charge
of the carriages, and the first night
out from Fort Laramie he came
into camp late, warm and puffing,
and cheery too, for he had only
one upset with the vagon and two
with the cart. So affairs pro
gressed, with various accidents to
the wagon and cart, now a capsize
andnow a repair, now a man and
now a mule objecting, and with
equal Roman firmness till they
arrived
AT THE GREAT PAIR GROUNDS
of traders and Indians in the
mountains. When they put out
for the rendezvous, all parties and
persons except the Flatheads ad
vised them to leave the wagon.
However, after camp was made,
the doctor came in, and, to the
general surprise, with his four
wheeled companion. "He was
totally alone," says Gray, the
historian, one cf his company, "in
his determination to get his old
wagon through to the waters of
the Columbia, and the mission
station that might be established,
no'orie knew where."
Tnere is no sound like that made
by a stout loaded wagon on a
rough road, and now, after C000
years or so of stillness in these
wild regions, these sounds woke
the ech'des of the grand old moun
tains. Perhaps out of respect to
the .-prehistoric Americans who
are patiently wating for American
antiquaries to return 'from the old
world and ask a few home J
1 questions, we ought to doubt that
; 0,000. "We can hear them now,
in our mental ear, those Whitman
J wagons, and it will help the hear
ting if one will pronounce aloud the
j name that the Indians gave the
"old wagons." They put together
the jerky s'llables the sound it
made as it rose and fell and
stopped in the soft grass, and
among the rocks, and called it:
" chick-chick-shani-le-kal-kash . "
On the caravan moves, trader and
Indian and preacher and women,
mules, pack-saddles and ponies
the wagon far in the rear, now
saj'ing on the grass land 'chick
chick' and now among the rocks
,'kal kash.' Mr. Gray says: "It is
due to Dr. Whitman to say, not
withstanding that this was the
most difficult route we had to
travel, yet he persevered with
his old wagon, without any par
ticular assistance. From Soda
Springs to Fort Hall his labor
was immense, yet he overcame
every difficulty 3nd brought it
safe through. I have since
traveled the same route three
times, and I confess I cannot see
how he did it."
Arrived at Fort Hull, about 100
miles north of Salt lake, all bag
gage and luggage is reduced as
much as possible and repacked.
Here the parties mission and
Hudson's Bay, and postmen too
combine to say that the wagon
can be hauled no further. The
terrible canons and bottomless
creeks in the Snake plains make
it impossible. But the iron doctor
is immovable. Then they say he
must at least take it apart and
pack it if it goes .on. Finally the
indomitable man makes a com
promise, converts the wagon into
a cart, loads in the duplicate
wheels and axle tree, and starts
again, on whels, for the Columbia.
More clumsy compromises between
religious creeds and political
platforms have been made, and,
after all, it was the same thing,
whether it went forward
ox two whi:i:ls or pour,
be it wagon or cart, and if it car
ried the substance of doctrine, and
the wheels echoed "chick chick"
on the soft grass and the "kal
kash" of the rocks meant the same
thing the one wagon and its one
load. True, when they come to
the Snake river, both the cart and
its driver had to do some swim
ming, but they both came out on
the westrbank, and so much near
er to Oregon. So they finally en
tered Fort Boise, two miles below
Boise City. This was so rude a
structure that it would hardly pass
for a cattle pen or mule coral.
Here the cart took on a very seri
ous look, and so did every man
when he looked at it. The ex
pressions of opinion as to its fur
ther advance became more de
cided, and some of them terse and
brief and to missionary ears, more
inelegant than to mountaineers.
The escort of Hudson's Bay
men had stopped at Ft Hall, and
all but the doctor felt the need of
moving on in a light and compact
and very defensible order. It was
again suggested to take it apart
and pack it through, if the mules
carrying it would not slide from
the precipices they would have to
scale and descend.
Finally another compromise was
effected. The wagon should be
left at Fort Boise till some one
could come back and take it on to
the established mission. This
was done, and judgments harmon
ized soon after the "old wagon"
went through, the first to pass the
plains and the mountains so far
towaad Oregon.
Thus the irrepressible energy
of this man pioneered for a car
riage way to Oregon in 183G. The
year before, the first house had?
been built in San Francisco, steam i
cars had run out from Boston to- j
ward Lowell and Worcester and
Providence, and this year 1,273
miles of rail had been laid in the
country, and the whistle and rattle
of locomotives were full cf the
prophecy of the 90,000 miles of it
that we have to-da". So the
"chick-chick-shani-ie-kal-kash" of
the doctor was not one of the mi
nor prophets.
The movement of this nation
westward on wheels is an interest
ing stud)'. One of the earliest
in it may be found in the records
of Newton, Mass., for the year
1CS7: "John Ward and Noah
Wisewall were joined to our se
lectmen to treat with the select
men of Cambridge, to la' out a
highway from our meeting house
to the Falls." We cannot trace a
current tradition to any other
board of highway commissioners.
The tradition says that being in
structed to lay out a highway into
the western wilderness on the
Charles river, between its upper
and lower falls in Newton, and in
the judgment of the commission
ers, that point was as far west
ward as any public road would
ever be needed. This bluff was
about 10 miles "out west" from
the Boston meeting house.
However, the "western fever"
so increased that an extension of
the public road more than 10 miles
from Boston was demanded, for,
in the great and general court of
Massachusetts for 1G83, we find
this entry:
"Whereas the way to Kenecti
cut, now vesed being very hazard
ous to travcllew by reason of our
deepe river that is passed fower or
fiue times ouer, which may be
avayded as is conceived, by a bet
ter and nearer way, it is referred
to Maj. Pynchon in order ye said
may be layd out and well-marked.
We having hired him two Indians
to guide him in his way, and con
tracted with them for fivety shil
lings it is ordered that the treas- j
urer of the county pay the same j
in county pay towards the effect
ing the worke.1' j
One century and one year after
the Newton survey, RufusPutman
started with his ox-cart on a three '
month's journey farther wesUl
Now we hear the old wagon of
Marcus Whitman rattling among
the head streams of the Columbia.
This remarkable and now historic
vehicle that had been the center of
so many doubts and hard sayings
and anxieties as a moving treasure
coveted by the Indians, and tiie
subject of so many upsets and un
heeded baths, and that had been
developed inversely and degrad
ingly into a cart, finally and later
comes out all right
OX THE LOWER COLUMBIA,
at Fort Walla Walla. When the
company arrive there, in advance
of the old wagon, they have been
out over four months from the
Missouri, having traveled about
2,250 miles. They had made an
average of over more than Jio miles
a day, which was a good rate for a
caravan, since the average of a
Roman army was 1G miles.
Bruised, broken and badly knocked
to pieces in its wrenching and
shattering "Kal Kash," the abused
and degraded vehicle finally came
out in a very respectable condi
tion. Its fierce struggles and good
condition after victory remind one
much of the battles of the gods of
our Northmen ancestors, For a
night's frolic they could be hacked
and hewed and cut up on a celes
tial battle-field, and then appear
as happy and as good as new the
next morning.
When the writer resided in St.
Louis, the old family carriage of
Gen. Clark, the first that ever
crossed the Mississippi, was turned
off at auction for $5. Probably
to-day its remains rest in s-osne
spot, as obscure and as thoroughly
covered over bv drift in the stream
j of time as the grave of De Soto,
somewhere in the lower Mis.-ippi.
It would be -a-. rare ' antiquity and
treasure t. head a procession, cel-
j ebra ting the first 'Or Mcoml cen
tennial of its "L'Auul du Coup."
But the old wagon of Dr. Whit
man would be a rarer treasure and
relic. It carried more national
destiny than the stately coach of
the general. Very pleasant his
torical coincidences associate these
two men and the two carriages.
In lSO-i the general, then lieuten
ant, went over to view the newly
purchased Oregon, and took the
first look of the Pacific that an
American citizen ever had of it
from American soil. Thirty-two
years afterward the doctor fol
lowed with his wagon on the trail
of the general. It would be diffi
cult to find two single acts in the
lives of two men that have so
marked American history.
The work was done substantially.
The wagon and the. two brides,
Mrs. Whitman and Mrs. Spauld
ing, had won Oregon. The first
wheels had marked the prairie,
and brushed the sage, and grazed
the rocks, and marked the river
banks all the way from the Mis
souri' to the Columbia. How many
thousands have since been on that
trail, with their long miles of
canvas-topped - teams! The first
white women had crossed the
continent, andjiohonly witnessed,,
but achieved the victory. For in
going through, Whitman's "old
wagon" had demonstrated that
women and children and house-
United States wanted Oregon, and
afterward 200 emigrant wagons
went over and took it, under the
lead of the same indomitable
doctor. 2V. Y. Herald.
iI i
PO
Absolutely Pure.
Tills powder never varies. A man el of
purity, strength aud wholesomeness. More
economical than the ordinary kinds, aud
cannot be vld In competition with the mul
titude of low test, short weight, alum or
phosphate powders. Sold only f" emu,
llOVALliAKIXCroWDHItCO.. IOC Wall-st.
N.Y.
King of the Blood
Is not a "cure alt." It Is a blood-purifier and
tnnle. Imnnrirvof the blond nr!nj tliov.
tem, deranges tno circulation, and thus
ductus manv disorders, knov.-n Ii- Hfl7i
duces many disorders, knov.-n bv different
names to distinguish them according to ef
fects, but being reallv branches or phases of
that great generic disorder, Impurity oi
ig reallv b
ncric dlsoi
IA rer Complaint. Constipation, Xtrvfiu DU
tncp
order. Headache. Backacht. General Weal:
now. Heart lfcase,Dropsy, KMiicjl Dltcatc,
Pile, Rheumatism, Catarrh, Scrofula, Skin
Disorders, Pimple. Ulcers, i'lrdunix, Ac.
dc. Kins of the Blood prevents and
cures these by attacking the caiwe , Impurity
of the blood. Chemists and physicians agree
In calling It "the most genuine and efficient
preparation for the purpose." Sold by Drug
gists, SI per bottle. See testimonials, direc
tions, &c, in pamphlet, "Treatee on Diseases
of the Blood." wrapped around each bottle.
D. RANSOM, SON & Co.. Props
Buffalo, N. .
i n , . . e ., , , i nave been none. A slight, dry cough is
hold gOOUS the family courd be sometimes attendant. The patient com-
. i . r it .ii plaiiw of weariness and debility; he is
earned over to Oregon. J t so, the . easily startled : his feet are cold or bum-
H xfA-Jfis?'Ss. ?K
W a ROYAL rS2 A
-V&l
-ifc SSS?nRir
TBEGREU lf
MEUl
FOB
RHEUMATISM,
Neuralgia, Sciatica, Lumbago,
Backache, Soreness of (he Chesf,
Gout, Quins, Sore Throat, Swell
ings and Sprains, Burns and
Scalds, Goneral Bodily
Pains,
Tooth, Ear and Headache, Frosted
Feet and Ears, and all other
Pains and Aches.
No Preparation on earth equals St. Jacozs Oil
u a safe, sure, simple and cheap External
Remedy. A trial entails but the coparatiTely
trifling outlay of SO Cents, and erery one suffer
ing with pain can haro cheap and positiro proof
of it claims.
Directions in Heron Languages.
E0LD BY ALL DBUGGISTS AED DEALEE8
IKHEDIOIHE.
A.lTOCrSIJSR &v CO.,
Saltimorc,2IcL, XT. 8. A,
SYHPTOHS OF A DISEASED LIVER.
Pain in the right side, under edge o!
rilH, Increasing on pressure; sometimes
the pain is on the leftside; the patient la
rarely ab'.c to lie on the left side; some
times the pain is felt under the shoulder
and is,somelImcs taken for Rheumatism
in the arm. The stomach is affected with
loss onppetite and sickness; the bowels
in general are costive, sometimes alter
nating with laxity; the head Is troubled
with pain.accompanled with a dull, heavy
sensation in the back part. There Is gener
ally a considerable loss of memory, accom
panied with a painful sensation of having
ten. uiiuonw bonieimug wnicu ougnt to
ins, ami he complains of a prickly sensa
tion oi tue sinii; ins spirits arc tow, ana,
although huissatisucd thatexerclse would
be lctit'tkial to him, yet he can scarcely
summon up fortitude enough to try it.
If you have anyof the above symptoms,
you can certainly he cured by the use of
tho genuine lill. C. McLAE'S MVXR
j When you buy McXane's FIllo, insist
on linl.is Ilt. C. McLAN'K'S CELE
1 i:UATi:i l.IM:it PILLS, made by Flcm
I iiijj Itros.. Pittsburgh, Pa.
; If von cm not net tiie genuine DR.
i O. 31 vL. AN ITS Livr.lt PILLS, send us
i ::.? cents by mail, and we will send them
' to you.
' Fl J3IIXG BROS., riltslmrgh, Pa.
A 31. .IOIISSON.
C. IF. STICKKI.S
: A. M, JOHNSON & Co.,
i
j Dealers in
iSbtp CbaiiDtry ai Groceries
i
J CROCKERY &. CLASS WARE.
Also "Wholesale Dealer? in
i
ll'niuls. Oils, Varnislies, Gl ss.
lutO-. Artists Oil ami Water
Colors, painf ami ItaLsn
( mine liruslics.
j Constantly on hand a full and choice stock
ni siapic atiu ranry tirocenes unly tno
Brst kept.
Our stock of Crockery and ;ias.s
Wart is the Siarjjost and most Complete
Stock ever opened in Astoria.
Consisting of
Tea and Dinner Pets Toilet Sets. Glass.
Fruit, and Water Sets. Bar Fixtures. Ale
aru:s. Ponies, Hustle Bottles Goblets, .Tum
blers Lemonade Cups, &c, s.c.
Everything sold at lowest Living Kates.
Quality Guaranteed.
An Examination will more than repay you.
Sutfon'.s fiemtiuc Cape Ann
5i!c.d Clothing.
Double Long Coats, Half Peas
Double suits.
Fisherman Jumpers.
Fisherman 1'antH.
Aprons. Sleeves, Kubber Boots,
Klanket tfhirt.s, Hocks, etc
At San Francisco Prices.
A Liberal ifiscount to the Trade.
Ship Masters Supplied.
II. P. CHADBOURNE, Ajent.
On the Roadway, near "Water Street.
FOB, SALE.
mnN SHARES CANNERY STOCK
1 terms private. Also, Lot 4. Block 10,
lecture's Ast. with Improvements thereon.
Also three good farms within easy distance
of Astoria terms easy. Lots In McCiure's,
Snivel 's and Adair's Astoria, and three
blocks in Alderbrook flfteen acres tide land
on Young's Bay. Aho, a good paying busi
ness in Astoria.
tf BOZORTH & JOHNS.
m&i&VS?&SfJZi Z -vsm-vo?
WILLIAM HOWE
-DEALER IX-
Doors, Windows, Blinds, Transoms, LumBer.
ah kinds ox j0&$b$& raaKEsrc
OAK LUMBER,
glass, & Bracket Work
Boat Material, Etc. "fjplitlpll a specialty.
-I
,
j Boats of all SSinds Made to Ordet-
:
" V :
sST"Orders from a distance promptly attended to, iuid.satisfaction guaranteed in ail cases.
S. ARNDT & JFERCHEN,
ASTORIA. - OREGON.
The Pioneer Machine Shop
BLACKSMITH
SHOP
r;i'ryjxxm';y-r.
axd --mBaLJttjL'&
-ni-L .jmmm tmfjr -
Boiler Shop
All kinds of
ENGINE, CANNEEY,
AXD
STEAMBOAT WORK
Promptly attended to.
A specialty made of repairing
CANNERY DIES,
FOOT OF LAFAYETTE STREET.
ASTORIA IRON WORKS.
Beutox Street, Neajj. Parker House,
ASTORIA. - OREGON.
GENERAL MACHINISTS AND
BOILER MAKERS.
LINDsfflARINB BMINB8
Boiler Work, Steamboat Work,
and Cannery Work a specialty.
OASTIKTGrS.
Ofall DeHerlptlons made to Order
at Short Notice.
A. D. "Wash, President.
J. G. Hustler, Secretary.
I. W. Cask, Treasurer.
Jous Fox, Superintendent
WM. EDGAR,
ASTORLV, --- OREGON.
Dealer In
Cigars, Tobacco and Cigarettes
Meerschaum and Brier Pipes,
Stationery and Optical Coods,
Joseph Rodgers and Wostenholm
GENUINE ENGLISH CUTLER
Revolvers and Cartridges.
WAITHAM AOT ELGIN
Gold and Silver Watches and Chain
Fino and Coarse Liverpool
SALT.
Tin Plate. Block Tin, Caastic Hodn,
For sale ex "Warehouse atfPortland
or Astoria by
B AfcVqiJK, UTHRIE & CO.
dtf "PerYlaHC!or.
Barbour's
No. 40 12-Ply
SALMON TWINE !
CORR-MB tMD LINES,
SEINE TWINES.
A FulPStocK NoW oruHand.
HENRY DOYLE & CO.,
511 Market Street, Saa Francises
Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast.
;i'ryjxxm';y-rs
f5GZ-& SCvSSIteir-ik
SKBSFr'
BUSIIvESS CARDS. ,
P v. iiol.:x,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
AUCTIONEER, COMMISSION AND IN
SURANCE AGENT.
Q.E1.0 F. PAJtKEK,
SURVEYOR OF
Clatsop County, and. City or Astoria
Olflce :-Chenamus street, Y. M. C. A. ball
Room No. 8.
Tjl D. wiNToar,
Attorney and Counselor at Lam.
ss-Ofilce in Pythian Building. Rooms 11, 12.
ASTORIA, - - - OREGON.
TAY TUTTIiE, 31. .
PHYSICIAN AND SUKGEONJ
Office Rooms 1, 2, and 3. PythlanBuild-
Ing.
Residenck Orer J. E. Thomas' Drug
Store.
O P. HICKS,
PENTIST,
ASTORIA, --- - OREGON
Rooms in Allen's building up stairs, corner
of Cass and Sqeniocqhe streets.
Q. A. BOWLBY.
ATTORNEY AT LA"W."
Chenamus Street. - ASTORIA; OREGOl
Dressmaking.
Plain and Fancy Sewing,
Suits zuade in tho host Style and
Gnaronteed to Pit
Mrs. T. S. Jezvett.
ROOMS OVER MRS. E. S. WARREN'?.!
G. A. STINSON & CO.,
BLACKSMITHING,
At CapU Rogers old stand, corner of Cass
and Court Streets.
Ship and Cannery work, Uorseshoclnp.
Wagons made and repaired. Good work
guaranteed.
LEATHERS BROS.
BOAT BlTir.IERS,
Up Stairs
Over Arntlt & Ferchen's Shop.
Call and examine the work we are dolnR
and see the wood we aro using, before mak
ing a trade elsewhere.
FIRST - CLASS WORK A SPECIALTY.
FOR SHE !
I offer for sale my ranch near Skipa
non in this County; it consists of
160 ACRES,
ElRlitj Acres improved, flti
gooil clu'clling House;
Two Unrns, Out Houses, etc.;
A Fine Orchard.
Everything is well improved and in
good condition. A large assortment of
Farming? Implements,
Three Fnsscnger Coaches.
One Kugsy,
3finc Hcatl Horses,
Cattle, Hogs, Etc.
This affords a rare chance for a man to
get a good home in the oldest settled
section in the state.
Terms favorable to one meaning busi
ness. C. A. MACUIITCE.
SOLID GOLD
JEELET,
Scarf Pins, Chains, Watches.
Of every .description.
The finest stock of Jewelry In Astoria.
S3T"A11 goods warranted as represented.
GUSTAV HAN EN, JEWELER.