The Daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1876-1883, November 08, 1882, Image 1

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Vol. xviii.
Istoria, Oregon, Wednesday Morning. November 8, 1882
No. 33.
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KENTONS LEAGUE WITH THE
SUN.
Simon Kenton was one of the
most noted of the parly heroes of
Kentucky, a man of nmch intelli
gence. wonderful courage and al
most matchless muscular capacity
He died neai Bellefontaine, Ohio,
in ISoGj at the advanced age of
eighty-one years. The annals of
the bordeis abound in accounts of
his thrilling adventures: but one
incident in his life 1 have never
seen in print, and thpiefore will ic
peat it as it has been told to me
by old huntcisand Indian-fighters,
who knew him personally and
heard it from his own lips. In my
telling, however, it will lack much
of Kenton's graphic, way of put
ting things.
Ho was a great smoker, the most
important supplies, next to his
weapons, being liis pipe, pouch and
tobacco. Food and clothing he
could capture with his gun, but
not so tobacco; and hence his zeal
to lay in a stock of his luxury be
fore setting out on any expe
dition. But fire to light his pipe
was not so icadily obtainable, it
being no little trouble to ignite to
bacco by Hint and steel. It will
be remembeied that friction
matches were not in common use
until years after Kenton's day.
At one time when a prisoner in
the hands of the British at De
troit, lie was particularly admired
by English officers on account of
his great strength and courage,
and the many lemarkable exploits
for which he was famous; and one
of these officers, observing his
fondness for tobacco and the dif
ficulty in lighting his pipe, pre
sented Kenton with a powerful
pocket burning-glass or lens, by
which he could easily" focus the
rays of the sun on the tobacco and
set it on fire. This thing worked
charmingly, and for many years,
wherever he went, held its place in
the pouch with his pipe and to
bacco. It is an incident in which the
sun-glass acted a significant part,
which I have resolved to relate.
A summer or two after he be:
came possessor of the glass, he was
again taken captive by a party of
Indians, who, recognizing him at
oncoj resolved to torture him to
death immediately, so as to rid
themselves of so formidable an
enemy before he should have time
or chance to escape. A stake was
driven into the ground and a quan
tity of dry leaves and wood piled
about it, and then the chief spoke,
in broken English:
"White chief hungry; eat fiie,
he feel better!"
Kenton asked the privilege of
smoking his pipe before burning.
Now the Indians of certain tribes
wete always singularby generous
in response to such lequests, es
pecially as towaid pipe and to
bacco they entertained a sort of
religious deference. Of these the
never robbed prisoners nor de
spoiled the bodies of the slain;
and among the few sacred objects
buried with the dead, pipes were
always included. It was on ac
count of this superstitious sanctity
that the pipe bore such an import
ant part in the ceremonies of coun
cil, and between tribes entertain
ing treaty together. They never de
nied a captive's request for a
smoke, and therefore Kenton was
immediately gratified by a grunt of
assent.
After securing his feet more
firmly with leathern thongs for
they knew too well his daring and
prowess to give him any advan
tage they unbound him that he
might fill and light his pipe and
enjoy his last earthly smoke. De
liberately he proceeded to crumble
up the tobacco and pack it into
the pipe bowl. This done ho
placed the long wooden stem in
his mouth, and seemed ready for
flint, steel and tinder with which
to light the luxury. With another
grunt a red man passed him the
customary implements; but, to his
great surprise, Kenton refused
them.
Then, with a dramatic gesture,
be extended his right hand toward
the sun in mid-heaven, it being
about noon, and holding it thus
with the buiiiing-glas clasped be
tween the thumb and forp-fingcr, he
dpxtrously brought it to a focus on
the eon touts of his pipo. which in
this way was quickly ignited, and
in a moment ho was puffing clouds
of smoke fiom his mouth.
This was beyond the wits of the
savages. Tho lens being of glas
and transparent, they had not ob
served it, and believed that
he had lighted hib nine bv simply
letting the sunlight pas thiough
the circle foiincd by his
thumb and fust finger. All un
concerned he pulled away, while
they gathered in an excited group
a few j-ards distant and discussed
the wonder in grunts and mutter
mgs. In a few minutes he had ex
hausted the contents of the pipe
bowl and piocecded to refill it.
At thib the led-men became bilent,
and watched him as if ho wore a
supernatural being.
While crumbling the tobacco
the glass lay unseen at his side,
and when he was ready to light
up again, with another still more
dramatic gcstuie, l.e seized the
lens and held it towards the sun,
and, with three or four cries of
ni3sterious and startling import to
the Indians, began whiffing the
bluish smoke a coolly as be
fore. By this time the superstition of
the savages was in full operation,
anil the' were ripe for almost
any display of Kenton's supposed
supernatural power. Probably no
people on the whole globe were
ever more sensitive to such iflu
ence than the native tribes of
North America. What they
could not comprehend they
dreaded with craven fear, especi
ally if it emanated from the. sun or
clouds. Seeing his advantage,
Kenton stretched forth his hand
again, holding tlie glass so as to
kindle the leaves near him. Then
with a wild cry, he swung his arms
above his head, adroitly shifting
the lens to his left hand, and then
quickly started a smudge in another
place.
Next, struggling to his feet, tied
though they were, he gave an al
most superhuman leap jumping
being Kenton's special forte and
brought himself to the heap of
fagots that had been gathered for
his particular entertainment, and
seating himself near them, went
through a panorama more weird
than before, wheicupon a flame
blazed up through the stake, as if
the victim were aheady fastened
to it and read' for the torture.
His next performance was to
beckon to the chief to come and
unbind his ankles. The mystified
Indian hesitated, but finally
ventured curiously forward, as if
not daring to disobey such a man,
and began with nervous fingers
to fumble at the deerskin door.
While thus engaged, Kenton
lifted one hand, and instantlv a
lurid, blistering point of fire fell
on the red man's wrist. With an
"Ugh!" he jerked his hand away,
only to feel the burning focus on
his head.
This was too much for even an
Indian's nerves; and with a cry
of teiror the old chief sprang
away and ran to the nearest tree,
behind which he took shelter. Tho
Wst of the savages imitated their
leader, leaping behind adjacent
trees; and while with wondering
eyes they stared at Kenton, he
proceeded leisurely to unbind his
own ankles.
This done, he waved his arms
toward the sun as it giving thanks
or invoking furtbpr aid; and then
went to a powder-horn, dropped
by one of the Indians, and with
draw! ng the stopper, placed it as
he wanted it, fixed his sun-glass so
that the focus would enter the
horn, and stepping toward the
Indians gesticulated fiercely at
them. Instantly there was a vivid
flash and a roar , the powder-horn
disappeared, and the frightened
savages fled as if the "Great
Spirit" had suddenly come to de
stroy them.
At this, Kenton considered
himself master of the field, and, in
less time than it takes to tell it,
flung upon the fire whatever the
Indians had left behind them,
seized his own property that they
hail takon fiom him, gun and gai
ments, and made hate fiom tho
scene.
A few years later, when peace
had been restored between Ameri
cans and English, and the Indians
were on pacific terms with the
"Hunters of Kentucky," Kenton
had the pleasuic of meeting at a
"pow-wow' with some of the war
riors who had composed the patty
so singularly worsted by a sun
glass. They knew him at once,
and showed an ungovernable fear
as he came forward to shake hands.
During the "pow-wow" he often
detected them gaz.ing at him with
furtive glance, and as he still hail
the lens, he mischieviously seized
the first opportunity to call down
fire fiom the sun to light hi pipe
again, accompanying it with
strange gestures.
Afterward he learned that thev
believed him in league with the
"Great Spirit," and able, if he
wished, to summon the sun to
battle for him. Wide Atcalce.
Tne "Way It Is Done.
At the rate wheat is quoted in
Liverpool, and the price for ton
nage in Portland to-day, wheat
ought, and would be wortli here
at least ninety cent. Why, then,
will it bring only seventy-five
cents? Because a majority of the
wheat is stored iu warehouses be
longing to-the wheat ring in Port
land. One man, representing the
Portland wheat-buyers, built waie
houses from Airlie to Portland, and
from Portland to Lebanon; and
they now have the faimers' wheat
in their houses, to be used as need
ed. Tne' are sure of getting it
when needed, and therefore there
is no rivalry between them.
Heretofore, when wheat was
stored in the warehouses of a doz
en different merchants, there was
a rivalry, and very often they
would bid up amongst themselves,
and force the Portland merchants
to raise the price; or, when they
stored it in the farmers' warehouse,
they were sure the wheat was there
until the money was paid; but now
there is no merchant to force the
market, as the wheat is in the
warehouses of the Portland ring.
Theie is no use denying it, an
agreement exists between them
not to run against each other; but
rather, in case one firm needs
wheat badly, the others will loan
it to them from the combination
warehouses. If anybody doubts
it, let them go toPortland and try
to sell wheat. The offer of one is
the offer of all. There is a com
bination, and they own the ware
houses, all denials to the contrary
notwithstanding. Polk County
Itcmizer.
Too many men appear to be
only skirmishing around during
the present life without any of the
real enjoyments which this world
offers to every one who will gather
them. Tii the first place, if he
does not marry a good wife and
there are plenty of them running
around loose the fatal mistake is
made which can never be remedied.
If a man intends to be settled, and
through some channel of industry
enjoy all the comforts and pleas
ures of life, he should surround
himself and family with as many
of the conveniences of life as his
means and industry can command.
He shonld keep in mind that in his
home with his family is the best
place for contentment and happi
uess. And the best way to be
happy is to make his family happy
and his home pleasant. Every
hour needlessly spent away from
the home of domestic happiness is
just so much lost in the great sura
of life's comforts. One life one
home one wife one aim and
one end to all of life's struggles
and hopes. Without happiness
all work is a burthef"WJfteii
"o w"Tr!ViI'?K
conducive to happiaiftjtlfcjjrfjp
tion to The A.sToiiiKiSko7-W
i . . i .JS-Jf&ritf-sr
mis a j rear ui. HUYaMpfrfrirtiW-H
found foremest m typJMv&Qf $ ji
curing comfort.
Pimm
1 ka m: -. : i jc H
r.?.j5
CXM$'
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GENlIi
FOIL
RHEUMATISM
?
Neuralgia, Sciatica, Lumbago,
Backache, Soreness of the Chest,
Gout, Quins, Sore Throat, Swell
ings and Sprains, Burns and
Scalds, General Bodily
Pains,
Tooth, Ear and Headache, Frosted
Feet and Ears, and all other
Pains and Aches.
No Preparation on earth equals St. Jcons Oil
as safe, surf, simple and cheap External ,
Bemedjr. A trial entails but the comparatively
trifilng outlay of 60 Ceati, and erery one tuffer
Ing with pain can baro cheap and ixratire proof
of its claims.
Directions in Eleven Languages.
60LDBYALLDEUGQI3TSANDDEALEBS i
IB JLEDIOIKi:.
A. VOGIXER & CO.,
Baltimore, -Jfci, V. S. A.
Quartz discoveries have made in
the Potlach country, about twenty
miles above Lewiston. which
makes considerable stir anion? the
residents of that countrv.
Philip Kitz has entered into a
contract with the Northern Pa
cific to plant forest trees at the
stations between Ainsworth and'
Eitzville. The most of those
planted last year made- a thrifty
growth.
At the close of, a long interview
with Aristidcs -Welch, Esq.. of Kr
denheim Stock Farm, near Chest
nut Hill, Penn., that gentleman,
who bred Iroquois and Parole, said:
"I want my groom to continue the
use of St. Jacobs Oil, for it is an
excellent thing for horses." Prom
inent horsemen all use it.
In transporting the eggs of sal
mon and trout it is of the utmost
importance that the crates of eggs
should not be allowed to have too
high a temperature. This is de
struction to salmon eggs in tran
sit, no matter how they are
packed.
A LETTER ?& GERMAN
j-:.i...,Janusiry', lsx.
Very esteemed sirs:
The praise your l.ier PiSN liae called
forth here Is wonderful. After taking iio
and a half boxes of your genuine l)i:. .
MeLANK'S I.IVKU FILLS, I ha. , n
tircly recovered from luyfouryeaiVMitrw
iiiK. All who know mo wonder how I,
who, for so many years, had no ii'iix-tilc.
and could not sleep for backache, Miuh
in my .side, and general stomach iom
plaints, could have recovered.
An old lady In our city who ha.-.Msf,cw-d
for many years from kidncv dKca, . :md
the doctors had given her up, took twouf
your Pills, and sot more relief than -h,.
has from all the doctors. Yours, rul .
J. VON 1!'IJ Hi lit;.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.
The genuine arc never sugar-coated.
' Kcry box has a red -wax seal on the l.d,
with the impressien: McLane's i.iwr
Fill.
The genuine MeLANirs LIVKK
FILLS lcar the signature of C. McLnm
and Fleming Bro. on the wrapper.
Insist upon having the genuine I)K. (.
McLAXfS LIVER PILLS, prepared li
Fleming Bros., of Pittsburgh, Pa., Hie
market being full of Imitations of ii,(
name McLnne. spelled dillcrcntly, but l
same pronunciation.
If our btorekeeicr does not hae the
genuine IK. C. McLAXE'S fi:i.i:
IJKATEI LIVEtt FILLS, send us .'
cents and we will send yon a tox l. uu.il,
and a set of our advertising cards.
FLEMING BROS., Fitfolim gh. Pa.
ifl' - CELEBRATED HX
g-jji.wg.j-ra
MCNV TOTim WW
EOT
7 29CfflBSMBHB3HWHBHr
i mUVJMKMMBsHaPfetfra,
ROSCOE'S FIRST CLASS
Oyster Saloon, i3
cHjivvurs street, asioria.
mm: t'Nii:i:si:xn is pleased to
JL .uinotliM'c to tin iitlHr tli.it heh.i" p-i-lwil
.1
I'ISIST 'IjA!S
ZET-cvtiiDLS House ,
Ami fimii-Iu". in hrt-c.tsMIe
ov.vrKi:. nor cori'EC tka. irrc.
AT T1IK
Ladies' and Gent's Oyster Saloon.
CIIEXAMUS STREET.
Plf.ise "i c mi' :i .all.
i:osni::MXOX, Proprietor
A. M. JOHNSON & Co.,
miu biiamiiGiu ami it
lio !. niicl Coi'dap oi'nll Kinds.
i:iifIiN.iat-i!i and DIcttaliiH'or
Tin (I'liniiio F.tmN Scoicli
Salmon mt Twines.
3ipriii:iiI Twines: Cnmas. all
IVo'ss Copper Tipol Oars.
The le-.t assortment of
G ROCERIES
lit Town.
Tito osi COrrjMlS ami TEAS.
Try on r Melrose Ralcins; Powder
Poxstlu'lj the best perinade.
CAUSS-TJSr GOODS
iifall kinds put up by best PacKers.
Kichard ,on and liobbinS Canned Goods.
Terms Caxli. Fronts Small.
liBT.IVE US A CALL-5W
WILLIAM EDGAR,
Corner Main and Chcnninus Streets,
A&TOHIA OltEdON
DK.Vl.hR 15
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
Tho Celebrated
JOSEPH RODCERS &. SONS
GENUINE ENGLISH CUTLERY
AND THE GENUINE WOSTENHOLM
ami otbor Ens'iaa Cutlery.
FAIRCHILD'S GOLD PENS
Genuine Ideershaum Pipes, etc.
A Jine stock of
Watches and .Jewelry, Muzzle and
Krcerii Loading Shot Gnnn unit
J:islcs,.evoJverN, Pirttoln.
anil Ammunition
ffAKINE
CLASSES
AUSO A FINK
AsMirtnient of line Sl't'CTACLES and EYE
HliASSiJS,
B. B. FRANKLIN,
UNDERTAKER,
Corner Cass and Sttemoqhc streets,
ASTOUIA. OREGON
IKAI.KU IX vj
WALL PAPER
AM)
WINDOW SHADES
ANI
UNDERTAKERS GOODS.
1IAGNU8 G. CROSBY,
Dealer in
HARDWARE, IRON, STEEL,
Iron Pipe and Fittings,
PLUM REUS AND STEAM FITTERS
Goods and Tools,
SHEET LEAD STRIP LEAD
SHEET IRON TIN AND COPPER,
Stoves, Tin Ware and House
Furnishing Goods.
JOBBING IN SHEET IRON, TIN, COP
PER PLUMBING and STEAM FITTING
MjSy i d -iVWTIITITtT'. '-IwiEjfeJsZl'.T 'J5V3MrTC?
Done with t.eatness and dispatch,
j None but first class workmen employed.
l AljSw'HeaUtST'
Sr5gg9SiiHSS5&
r . SiYtiC UVAlUrlMMHBvW Hhff ylfii 33 , Arjt,ii i. ? -' tiKh Ld.x. !!
i
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1 1
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a 5 oo m
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o
WILLIAM HOWE,
ifiifiitiiitiatititifitiffiiiiiiiitiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiit nwMf !! !
DKUXTC IX
Doors, Windows, Blinds, Transoms, Lumber.
All kinds of
OAK LUMBER,
GTsASS.
Boat Material, Etc.
j Boats of all Kinds Mad to Ordr. I
CSfOnIcrs from :i dttaiite prompth altfiidt'd
MJSCELLAXEOUS. -
ASTORIA IRON WORKS.
BltttTOX STUKCT, NEAR rAKKEK HOUSE.
ASTORIA. - OREGON.
GE ERL MACHINISTS AND
BOILER MAKERS.
LANDiMARINEEMES
Boiler Work, Steamboat Work,
and Cannery Work a specialty.
Of all ftPHcriptieitg nado to Order
at Short Xotirc.
A. I). "Wass, Treslilent.
J. (J. Hustler, Secretary.
I.W. Cask, Trea-snrer.
Jonx Fox, Superintendent
S. AllNDT & EERCHEN,
ASTORIA. - OREGON.
The Pioneer Machine Shop
BLACKSMITH
SHOP4i
m
AMI i
Boiler, Shop
All kinds of
ENGINE, CANNERY,
STEAMBOAT WORE
Promptly attended to.
A specialty made of repairing
CANNERY DIES,
FOOT OF LAFAYETTE STREET.
k. f. sti: v r.xs. r. s. 1:1:0 vx
CITY
BOOK STORE.
Where um will find all tho standard uoiks
or the day, and a constantly ili.iuin
stook. of no cities and lanov
articles: e Keep the
best assortment of
variety goods
in the
city.
Pocket Books,
Picture Frames,
Steroscopes, Mu
sical Instruments,
Sheet Music, Bijou
terie, & Celluloid
Goods, etc., etc.
IS F. STEVENS & CO.
Wilson & Fisher,
SHIP CHANDLERS.
DEAI.KKS IX
Iron, Steel, Coal, Anchors, Chains,
TAR, PITCH, OAKUM,
WROUGHT AND CUT GALVANIZED
9Tnil Copper Nails al Burrs,
Shelf Hardware, Faints and Oils
Rubber and Hemp Packing of all Kinds.
Ti.-1.11l
riK
MUUULCSLL. -v K
'rTm!t-jC3-
mMm?'.
aHRO'"'
aaawCTv
o5 2z!Sw go
H o iO gc
- i p
- f " r-ira
XTXRztxnro
AND
Bracket Work
A .SPECIALTY.
to, ami atufactiun guaranteed in all usis.
BUSINESS CAKDS.
in V. IiOI,DKX,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
AUCTIONEB.R, COMMISSION AN1
SURAXCE AGENI.
TK. J. C. SJIAFTEJt,
PHYsICIlX SMd gVKBC5i.
(DFUTSCBEK AUZT.)
Diseases or the Tkrat a Specially.
Offlce over Conn's Dras Store.
T O. BOZOBTH,
U. .S. CoBiiuIftttloHcr, SaUurj Public, and
Insurance Ageat.
Agent tor the Hamburg-Bremen Fire Ins. Co.
of Hamburg Germany, and ot tne Trav
elers' Life and Accident las. Co., ot Hart
ford. Conn.
MTOfncc in Pj thlan Building. Rooms n, 12.
Q.EI4O F. PARKER.
SURVEYOR OF
Clatsop CoHnty,aBd Cltyar Astaria
Oillcer-Chenamus street, Y.M.C. A. hall
Room No. 8. s
"p 1. WIXTOIf,
Attorney and Counseler at Law.
a-Ofllcc In l'ythian Building. Rooms 11, 12.
ASTORIA, --- - OREGOX.
JAY TUTTIiE, M. I.
rilYSICIAN AND SUKGEON.
Okfick 0cr the White House Store.
Rejidkcf Over Elberson's Ilakery, op
posite Rarth & Myers Saloon.
4 li. FITITOX. M. D.
PliyMiclaB aad Sarseea.
Orncn Over A.V.Aliea's grocery astore.
Rooms, at the Parker Honsc.
XI P. IIICK8,
PENTIST,
ASTORIA, - - -" - OREGON
Rooms in Allen's building up statin, comer
of Ciss and Sqemocqhe streets.
T E. LaFOROE,
DENTIST
Oeiilal Kootas over Cae Stare,
Cheiiamus Street, - - Astoria, Oregon.
j Q. A. BOWLBY.
attorneyTat LAW.
Ciienamus Street. - ASTORIA, OREGON
G. A. STINSON & go.,
BLACKSMITHING,
At CAiif. Rogers old stand, corner or Cas
and Conrt Streets.
Ship and Cannery work. Horseshoeing.
Wagons made and repaired. Good wert:
guaranteed.
TAIIORIItGK
Cleaning Repairing.
NEAT, CHEAP AND QUICK, BY
CKORE JLOVETT,
Main Street, opposite N. Loeb'i,
MAX. WAGNER'S
HOWLING ALLEY.
MAX. WAGNER'S
Agency for the HatiiMl Bctr.
- HjrTutjer ueurercttw mymnt
4.r y&i? ftaW5gK3s
" -H. 1 J- rf'JlUfl
i P'v"k-.iiia-csi,-r-a
F 2 'y.-r-r
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