The Daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1876-1883, January 08, 1882, Image 1

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Vol. XYI.
Astoria, Oregon, Sunday Morning, January 8, 1882
$o. 83.
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SS Jr JM Jr Jf -Jill' J. t
THE FUTURE OF THE MORMON
the January Century, the
"Legal Aspects' of the Mormon
f roblem" are discussed bv Arthur
vr. bedgwick.
who concludes as
ioiiews:
The failure of the attempt to
break up the Mormon system by
Congressional legislation does not,
by any means, show that the Mor
mon system will ultimately prevail
in Utah. The operation of natural
causes Is certain, in the long run,
to sap the foundations of polyg
amy. The railroads have already
brought the Territory into commu
nication vfith the rest of the coun
try, and the development of the
mines must ultimately bring in a
large Gentile population almost
altogether male. A strong ten
dency in the direction of marriages
between Gentile men and the
daughters of Mormon parents must
spring up. Indeed, this is said to
show itself already. There is no
surplus of women in the AVest
from which to recruit polygamous
households; the birthsvof the two
sexes are always very nearly equal
and the Mormon population is no
longer being -rapidly increased
from abroad, as it was in the times
of the early persecution of the
church. It is now stationary, or
nearly so, and being rapidly hem
med in by a community having a
social system which all experience
shows is the only one permanently
adapted to modern industrial life.
As the Territory fills up, and the
Mormons are brought more and
more into relations with the rest of
the world, one of the strongest in
ternal causes of disintegration will
unquestionably be the sense of
shame operating upon the younger
female generation. In the natural
course of things, some of the
daughters of Mormon kouseholders
must marry Gentiles, and others,
who do " not marry outside the
church, will bo made keenly aware
that they are surrounded by a
community which regards their
position as a, degraded one. As
long as they could keep them
selves separated from tho rest of
the world, this Gentile feeling was
of Tery little consequence to them.
It did not affect them in their daily
life; it was something remote from
them, which they did not even
need to disregard. This cannot
continue forever, and indeed a
change must begin, if it has not be
gun already, as soon as the sur
rounding inonogamic Gentile sys
tem of marriage has a fair oppor
tunity to enter into competition
with its rival. Under these circum
stances, there is nothing to be done
with tho Mormons but to let them
alone. Persecution has been tried,
and has only served to strengthen
and increase them. Law has been
tried, and has proved of no use,
because it has not been enforced.
From the circumstances of the
case, it cannot be.
A Stranger's Mistake.
A Western merchant, who want
ed to do some sight seeing and
buy his fall stock at the same time,
entered a dry-goods jobbing-house
on Broadway, and accosted the
first person he met with:
'Are you the proprietor here?"
"Not exactly the proprietor,"
was -the reply; "at present I am
acting as shipping clerk, but I am
cutting my cards for ju partnership
next year by organizing noon
prayer-meetings in the basement."
The stranger passes on to a very
important personage with a dia
mond pin,.and asked:
"Are you the head of the house?"
"Well, no; I can't say I am at
present, but I've hopes of a part
nership in January. I'm only one
of the travelers'just now, but 1 am
laying fof a$2,000 pew in an up
town church, and that will mean a
quarter interest here in less than
six months."
The next man had his feet up,
his hat back, and a 20-cent cigar
in Iiis mouth, and he looked so
solid that the stranger said:
"You must run this establish
ment?" "Me? Well, 1 may run it very
soon. At present I am the book
keeper, but I am expecting to go
into a church choir with the old
man's darling, and become an equal
partner here."
The stranger was determined
not to make another mistake. He
walked around until he found a
man with his coat off and busy
with a case of goods, and he said
to him:
"The porters are kept pretty
busy in here, I see?"
"Yes," was the brief reply.
"But I suppose you are planning
to invest in a gospel hymn-book
and sine: the old man out of an
eighth interest, aren't you?"
"Well, no, not exactly," was the
quiet reply; "I'm the old man
himself."
And all the stranger said, after
a long minute spent in looking the
merchant over, was:
Well, durn my buttons!"
Haw Oysters.
Dr. William Roberts, in an;
interesting series of lectures on di
gestive ferments, published in
the Lancet, says: The practice of
cooking is not equally necessary
in regard to all articles of food.
There are important differences in
this respect, and it is interesting
to note how correctly tho experi
ence of mankind has guided them
in .this matter. The articles of
food which we still use in the un
cooked state are comparatively
few, and it is not difficult in each
case to indicate the reason of the
exception. Fruits, which we con
sume largely in the raw state, owe
their dietetic value chiefly to the
sugar they contain; but .sugar is
not altered by cooking. Milk is
consumed by us both cooked and
uncooked, indifferently, and ex
periment justifies this indifference;
for I have found on trial that the
digestion of milk by pancreatic
extract was not appreciably hast
ened by previously boiling the
milk. Our practice in regard to
tho oyster is quite exceptional,
and furnishes a striking example
of the general correctness of the
popular judgment on dietetic
questions. Tho oyster is almost
tho only animal substance which
we eat habitually, and by prefer
ence, in the raw or uncooked state,
and it is interesting to know that
there is a sound physiological
reason at the bottom of this pref
erence, ine lawn-colored mass
which constitutes the dainty part
of the oyster is ils liver, and this
is little else than a heap of glyco
gen. Associated with the glyco
gen, but withheld from actual
contact with it during life, is its
appropriative digestive ferment
the hepatic diastase. The mere
crushing -of the dainty between
the teeth brings these two bodies
together, and the glycogen is at
once digested, without other help,
by its own diastase. The oyster
in the uncooked state, or merely
warmed, is in fact, self-digestive.
But the advantage of this provis
ion is wholly lost by cooking, for
the heat applied immediately de
stroys the associated ferment, and
a cooked oyster has ,to be digested
like any other food, by tho eater's
own digestive powers.
-A Nasal Injector free with each
bottlo of Shiloh's Catarrh. Remedy.
Price CO cent Sold by V, K. Dement.
Whv will you cough when Shiloh's
Cure will give immediate relief. Price
10cts50ctiarid$l. Sold by W.E. Dement.
.1 Lismtn by thi: m;a.
Last niht I lay beside the vi Interna.
And, waking late. 1 heard the sound
without
Of rain, and licaul faroff the nilil sea
jjquj
Beyond the town a lonesome mHortj.
Hearing with ebb and How. eternallj
Along the rocky coast it pours its rout
Of waves, with constant roar, as of some
stout.
Hoar monster, fierce w illi fjrlcf or savane
glee.
Dark Afric hears, mvtlionlit, Hint thnii-
der-sound.
And Indian rivers; lone Pacific isles
Trembling do hear it ; from tuiiuiiuhei ed
miles
Arising, as the brown earth wheels its
round,
It with vast whisper grieves thtj pale
moon's height.
With how great songs, O God, Thoa
fill'bt the night.
W.P.Foiter, in January Centnru
Colombia's Enterprise.
When the hunter has found a
rubber tree he first clears away a
space from the roots, and then
moves on in search of others, re
turning to commence operations
as soon as he has marked all the
trees in tho vicinity. He first of
all digs a hole in the ground hard
by, and then cuts in the tree a V
shaped incision with a machete, as
high as he can reach. The milk is
caught as it exudes and flows into
the hole. As soon as the flow
from the cuts has1 ceased, the tree
is chopped down, and the trunk
raised from the ground by means
of an improvised trestle. After
placing large leaves to catch the
sap, gashes are cut throughout tho
entire length, and the milk care
fully collected. When it first ex
udes the sap is of the whiteness
and cousistence of cream, but it
turns black on exposure to the air.
When the hole is "filled with rub
ber it is coagulated by adding hard
soap or the roots of the mechvacan,
which have a most rapid action,
and prevents the escape of the
water that is always present in
fresh sap. When coagulated suffi
ciently, the rubber is carried on
the backs of the hunters, by bark
thongs, to the banks of the river
and floated down on rafts. The
annual destruction of rubber trees
in f:rtln,liln Jo fori- itrnqt inl Ytn
. , J '
industry must soon disappear alto-'
nether, unless the Government.
puts in force a law that already j
exists, which compels ,the hunters
to tap the trees without cutting
tliem ClOWII. It ttllS law Were
strictly carried out there would be
a good opening for commercial
enterprise, for rubber trees will
grow from eight to ten inches in
diameter in three or four years
from seed. The trees require but
little attention, and begin to yield
returns sooner than . any other.
These that yield the jrreatest
amount of rnbber flourish on tho
banks of the Simu and Aslato
rivers. The value of tho crude
india rubber imported into the
States ' annually is about $40,
000,000. juo ui me tun vniuic papers
. .... ...
Ki;cl,n.i ;., vnnf :,t i . i
published in kgypt said lately:!
"All our revenues are absorbed by
foreigners, all our merchants, all
our high officers of State are
foreigners. They are the lords
and we are the donkey-boys. They
live happily and we live a life of
degradation. They are paid well
and we are paid badly. Wo hope
the Chamber of Deputies will take
nil fmn inf n innpiilnHn(in J ?
another writes: "We were once'
the Kinrrs of the nnivproo W
tne rungs-oi ine uimerse. We
itm,n Sflfl fWin nitn ...l .,. .
,.v.w uu,UUv, ,uu u,.n u lYt. aru
30,000,000, and this is caused bv
' ' ' V
our indifference to religion, our
, . - ""
hearty reccntion of foreigners
J , . , . ",l-'.-3uc,B
our confidence m foreign journals,
Our sons and our daughters are at
the mercy of foreigners, and our
country is in their possession. Wo
must go back to our religion and
not listen to those who say fanat
icism is dangerous."
Ths Value of Life.
One of the interesting speciila-
j tioti recently started in England
)MS for a subject the present value
, .... , ... . ,
'of lilu as compared with its value
when "mankind did not spend half
' of its time in studvinf the nmhlnm
of ptolonging life. One of the
leading London pliy&icians declares
that men were happier and better,
and lived nobler lives, before the
pursuit of health and the yearn
ings for longevity became a craze
almost amounting to madness, and
before the questions what to oat,
drink and to avoid, and what to
wear, and how to live, by what
means to avoid infection, to keep
off disease, and to escape death for
a few weary and wearied years,
were the all-engrossing ones. An
other urges that the "survival of
the fittest," so far as the race is
concerned, is a great mistake; and
that humanity in general would bo
a great deal better off if there
were less of the loving labor now
expended in prolonging tho lives
of the weak, diseased and crippled.
There is no danger that either
of these views will find general
acceptance. The world has be
come so accustomed to studying
the laws of health and long life,
and enjoys the study so much,
that it is not likely to abandon it,
even for the purpose of bringing
back the happy days when then
didn't care anything about diet
and drainage and pure air. There
is just as little danger of any re
trogression in thi! mailer of caring
for the sick and helpless. It may
be worse for the race, in one as
pect of the case, to prolong lives
of suffcring-iruu'tonntcrfcre' with,
the natural process which extin
guishes fjic weaklings in a few
generations. But what the race
loses in this way it is repaid an
hundred fold in the cultivation and
expansion of its finer emotions.
' n - -- I"
A CARD.
To all who, are suffering from the
errors and indiscretions sf youth, nerv
ous weakness, early decay, loss of man
hood, etc., 1 will send a recipe that will
cure you FItEK OF CHANGE. This
great leincdywas discorded by a mis
addressed envelope to the Kcv. .Josi:rii
T. Ixmam, Station 1), New York City.
sionary in jsouiii America. enu a seir-
Peruvian Bllti-rw.
Cinchona Rubra
The Count Cinchou was the .Sjiauibli
Viceroy in 1'oru in 1KS0. The Countess,
I. In ..!.. ...An .......... ml 1... .... I ......:.
lent frvpr. frnm !i!iIi ?lin wn frwil hv
tho use of the native, remedy, the Peru
vian bark, or. as it vtas called .in the
language of the country, 'Qtiiwinina."
Grateful for her recovery, on her return
to Europe in HER!, she introduced the
remedy in Spain, where it was known
under various names, until I.innieus
called it Cinchona, in honor of tho lady
who had brought them ihat which was
more precious than tho gold of thelncas.
iu mils najaner a lapse nt iwo Hun
dred and fifty years, science has given
us noniing 10 rase us place, it enectu
allv cures a morbid annetite fur stimu
lants, by restoring the natural tone of
uiestomacii. it attacks excessive love
nflinuor as it does a feicr.aiirt destroys
both alike. The powerful tonic virtue!
oi mo uincuona is preserved in me
Peruvian Bitters, which are as ellective
against malarial fever to-day as they
were in tho davs of the old Spanish
Viceroys. We guarantee the ingredi
ents or tlie.se hitters to lie absolutely
pure, and of the bast known quality.
A ttMlt tlll oilfri' i i.ti flint .lit. 1 lltn
I - .. " " rutTj ,'M iiitti uin n uiu
best bitter in the w orld. 'The proof of
the pudding is in the eating," and wc
Ul numiing is in tne eaung, ' ar.u wc
willingly abide this test. For sale by
wunngiy aniuo mis lest, i-orsaie by
all druggists, grocers and liquor dealers.
unjer ii.
sAn
King Of the BlOOd
Is not "cure all." t Mablood-pnrirternnd
tonl, ,,,. of theMoodnolsons thesis.
tem. i1pkiii!pi Ibo circulation, and tints 111-
, ?. rilir..prs vnoun bv different
naniw tn iflstiDBubli theni arrorfllnK to ef -
feels, but belnc really branches or phase? ot
.thatmat cenonauKonlcr, liapiiritj- ot
jiiootl. fauclf are J-pTnlt. lllllhnuuei,
Lirercmuilntnt,Cimttiitton.XcrToiuDt-
rdir.1Itfi(lachc,mchache,actiaa1 W'mh-
inu. Heart mcanc, Dropsy, jcitlntu Dlitaue,
File, Ilheumatitm, CaUtnli, Scrnjuln, Skin
Disorders. Plmvlc. Vlca. Suxulnm. Ac..
ic. Kins of the Blood prevents and
cures these bv attacking tue caute. liunuritv
o! the blood. CheniUts and plij sicians asxeo
in calling it "the most gonulne and efficient
preparation for tho purpose." Sold by Drug
gists, 81 per bottle. See testimonials, direc
tions, &c. in pamphlet, '"Treatise on Diseases
ol tlin Blood," wrapped around each bottle.
D.KASsOM, SON & Co.,Prqps.
Buffalo, N,..
t'urnlsh.'il ItooniH to Let
At Mrs. Munson's lodging house.
Xoticr.
Just received per steamer Columbia,
a fine lot of eastern oj store, which will
be served up in first class style at Ros
coes, Occident block.
Tnlie Xotlce.
On after this date an additional 10
cents per cord will be charged on all
orders for sawed wood not accompanied
by tho cash, at Graj s wood yard. Jul v
1st, 1.S81.
Knitern Oyster.
Another lino lot of Eastern Oysters
just received at Koscoes, per steamer
Oregon. Occident block.
Choice Fruit.
All or the choicest kinds of apples in
the largest boxes for sale nt J. n. D.
Gray's.
Arrlsoni Lodsiiis IIoiiHe, Port
land, Oregon.
New house and first class in its ap
pointments. Third street, in Jf. It
Thompson's block, opposite Capt. Ains
worth. Rooms bv the day, week or
month. " .Miss. E. Anr.moxr.
Sotice to tho Ijiulle;.
Switches, curls and frizzes tniuln fr,mi
combings or cut hair. Call on or ad
dress W'M. UnLEJOIAKT.
Occident hairdiessing saloon,
Astoria, Oregon
Tlic Weekly Astonan
1". a Immunol h sheet, nearlv double
the size of the Daily. It is just the pa
per for the fireside, containing in addi
tion to all the current news, choice mis
cellany, agricultural matter, market le
ports, etc. It is furnished to single sub
scribers at S2 IK) per year in advance.
Buy the Weekly.
Tiik Wkkki.y Astomax for this
week is full of iust such information
and news of the country as your friends
in tne east want to see. it lias very
few advertisements, and is chock to the
muzzle of information that no familv
cau successfully p'queeze along without.
Two dollars will buy the whole wad for
a year, SI "o for ix nionths,or ten cents
per copj .
WilllaniHport Property.
Greath.in:ains.'nr now ofTrod la tha.
city ot uiinnisport for anv persons
wishing to locate from one lot to five
acres. It is well adapted for gardens,
dairy ranche-. or pleasant homes; well
elevated, situated one mile south of
Astoria on Youngs bay, with a good
graded road to the place. For further
information call at my residence near
the cemetery. Joiix Williamson'.
In the Whole History of 3Ieilirinc
Xo preparation lias ever performed
tueh marvelous cure-, or maintained ho
wide a reputation, as Aran's Cueiirv
PiXToiiAL, which is recognized as tho
world's remedy for nil diseases of the
thro.it and lung-.. Its long-continued
series of wonderful cures in all climates
has made It universally known as a safe
and reliable agent to employ. Against
ordinary eolds, which are the forerun
neisof more serious disorders, it acts
hpecdily and suielv, always relieving
suffering, and orten saving life. The
protection it affords, by its timely use In
throat and :hest disorders, makes it an
invaluable remedy to be kept always ou
baud in every home. Xo person can
afford to be without if, and those who
have once used it never will. From
their know ledge of its composition and
effects, physicians use the Citeiiry
Pectoral extensively in their practice,
and clergymen recommend it. It is
absolutely certain in its remedial effects,
anil will always cure where cures are
possible.
"FOi: SAl.U BY ALL DEALER.
.MISCELLANEOUS.
HOLMAN'S PAD.
i-'oi: Tin:
STOMACH,
LIVER,
AND
KIDNEYS.
TRADE HARK.
In all case of bullousnesj and malaria lu
every fonn, apreventativo and cure of chills,
fever and dumb ague. Dr. llolnian's Pad is a
perfect success. Ai'd for dyspepsia, siek
headache and nenous prostration, as the
Bad Is applied oer the pit of the stomach,
le (rreat nervun. centei.it annilillates the
disease at once.
It regulates the lUcr and siomachso suc
cessfully ihjt digestion becomes pertect.
Prof. D. A. Loomls says : "It Is nearer a
mihersal panacea than anything in medi
cine." This is done on the principle of ab
sorption, of which Dr. llolnian's Pad is the
only true exponent.
For all kidney troubles, use Dr. Ilolman's
Renal or Kidney Pad, the best remedy in tho
world and recoramenitea by the medical
faculty.
Beware of Bogus Fads.
Each genuine Holman's Pad bears the pri
vate revenue stamp of the Ilolman Pad Co..
with the above trade mark printed In green.
IJuy none without it:
For Sale by ail Druggists.
Dr. Ilolman's adviee Is free, l'ull treatise
wnt free on application.
Address : HOLSIAN PAD CO
Ttl Broadway, New York.
P. O. box 112.
IULL HEAD PAPER,
o
F 1JVEBY GRADE AND COLOU, PRIN-
eil or plain, ni lowest rates, at
The Astoria oEoe
p3l
3tii
MISCELLANEOUS.
S. ARNDT & JPERCHEN.
ASTOKIA. - OKKGON.
The Pioneer Machine tShop
BLACKSMITH
v&ggS
D:t.. oi -TtfiX'uASF
uiiiii iiiiii f ( n ii-t-
All kinds of
ENGINE, CAHHERY,
AND
STEAMBOAT WORK
Promptly attended to.
A specialty made nt repairing
CANNERY DIES,
foot ok i.aiyyi:tti: stkect.
ASTORIA IRON WORKS.
IlFNTON' STItPCT, XKAlt I'AIiKKIt HOUSE.
ASToiiu. - oi:i:oon
GENERAL MACHINISTS AND
BOILER MAKERS.
LJNDiHARIffB BVfHHBS
Boiler Work. Steamboat Work,
and Cannery Work a specialty.
A. U. Wa President.
J. (!. Hustlku, Secretary.
I. V. Cask, Treasurer.
John Kox, Superintendent
WILLIAM EDGAR,
Comer Main and Chenaraus Streets,
ASTOKIA OREGON.
DRALEK 13
CIGARS AND TOBACCO,
The Celebrated
JOSEPH RODCERS &. SONS
GENUINE ENGLISH CUTLERY
AND THE GENUINE W0STENH0LM
and other English Cutlery.
FAIRCHILD'S GOLD PENS
Genuine Heershaum Pipes, etc.
A flue stock or
"WatohcH and Jewelry, ."Iur.7-.lr and
nrccch fiorultac Shot Guns and
Klilc-ft, ItevolvcrH. Plutolx,
and Ammunition
OIjASSEM.
ALSO A FIXE
Assortment of .fine SPECTACLES mid EYE
ULuVBSlJS.
For Sale.
Per liritl-h liarK"Vanlock" duf nt Astoria
Mareh lit.
100 Tons No.1 Glencarnock Scotch
Pig Iron,
40 Tons .English Foundry Coke,
350 Tons Best Hard Steam Coal.
Ajijilj to
AUG. C. KINNEY,
Astoria, Oregon.
G RUMANIA BEER HALL
AJID
BOTTLE BEER DEPOT.
ChCT VKC3 STEEKT. ARTORIa,
The Kent of Layer ii Cts. a Glass
'Orders for the
Celtoteil ColuMa Brewery
HZ M" jhS fr
Left nt this place will be promptly attend
ed to.
GyNo cheap San Francisco Beer sold at
tills place
WM. BOCK. Proprietor.
WM-
IIOWIV
BOAT BUILDER,
ATTIIE OLD STAND, OKAY'S BUILDING
FIRST CLASS WORK A SPECIALTY.
MINT SALOON,
OPPOSITE O. R. & N. COMPANYS DOCK.
None but the best liquors and cigars passed
over the bar
.. V. SCI11ILDT.
&5fe!fc
SHO PfWl
I. "W. GASE,
IMPORTER AND WHOLESALE AND KF
TAIL DEALER IN
GENERAL' MEBCHAHDISE
Corner" Chenamus and Cass streets.
ASTORIA - - - -OREGON
I
BUSINESS CARDS.
XJ C. IIOLDEX,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
AUCTIONEER, COMMISSION AND
SURANCE agent; " -
T) A. McIXTOSM.
MERCHANT TAILOR,
Occident Hotel Building.
ASTORIA - - - OREGON
"P . TVIXTOJf,
Attorney and'Counsetor at Law.
Office InC. L. Parker's bulldin&.on Benton
steeet, opposite CustomHouse,
ASTORIA, - - - - OREGON.
TAY TUTTtE, M. .
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON;
Office Over theTVhlte House' Store.
Rl?flTnrcJ.E At Mrs Mnnvm'a fv,Tnnt
house. Chenamus street, Astoria, Oregon.
P CK.YXU, 3t. D
'PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Itooni Xo. a. Astorlan Biiltdlae.
(UP 8TAIBS.)
streets, Astoria, Oregon.
"P P. HICKS,
" PENTIST,
ASTORIA, - - - OREGON.
Rooms in Allen '3 building up stain, com
of Cass and Sqemocque streets.
J,
Q. A. BOWLBY.
ATTORNEY AT LATY.
Chenamus Street. - ASTORIA. ORKGOr
Q II. BAIN Jfc CO.,
DRALKIt Hi
Door. Windows, minds. Trim
sonis, Lumber, Etc.
All kinds of Oak Lumber, Olass, Boat Ma
terial, etc.
Steam Mill near Weston hotel. Cor. Geo
evl e and Astor streets.
J. H. D. GRAY,
Wbolesale and retail dealer In.
ALL KIXDS OF FEED,
Hay, Oats, Straw Weed, Etc
General storaze and Wharfage on reason
able terms. Foot of Benton street. Astoria
Oregon.
Take Notice.
John Rogers, Centra! Market,
lias received a largo Invoice of
BARRELS AND HALF BARRELS
of the best quality.
And is now ready to supply Eutchers Can
neries apd all others, cheap for cash.
MRS. DBHBT,
DEALER T.V
New and Choice
mi'lli n:e r y,
Desire? to call the attention of the Ladles of
Astoria to the fact that she has received
a large assortmont ot tho
LATEST STYLES OF
Hats, Bonnets, Trimmings,
AND
screen? goods.
Comer Main and Squemoqhe Streets.
Wilson &. Fisher
DKAI.F.B3 IN
LUBRICATING OILS, COAL OIL,
PAINTS AND OILS.
Sheet, Round, and Square Prepared
Rubber Packing.
PROVISIONS, MILL FEED,
GARDEN SEED, GRASS SEED.
Which will be exchanged for country pro
duceorsoldal lowest prices.
Corner Chenamus and Hamilton Streets
ASTORIA; OREGON.
Mrs. P. M. Williamson,
DEALER IN"
DRESS" TRDIMINGS,
All kinds of
iWQOLS, ZEPHYRS,
LADIES UNDERWEAR, ETC,
Corner of Cnss and Jefferson streets, Astoria
E&Stnmplng and Dress Making dose to
order. -
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