The Siuslaw news. (Florence, Lane County, Or.) 1960-current, January 27, 2018, SATURDAY EDITION, Page 3B, Image 11

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    SIUSLAW NEWS ❚ SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2018
Siuslaw
from 1B
several times thanks to a solid defensive
effort.
The 40-28 loss dropped the Lady Viks
to 0-4 as the Lady Bulldogs (1-3) picked
up their first Far West League win.
That same night, Marshfield defeated
Douglas, 54-30, and Brookings-Harbor
beat South Umpqua just as handily, 51-
34.
The boys game saw Siuslaw get
ahead early and stay ahead through most
Little
from 1B
consider yourself a member of
each team described.
Team A — The season is
over. You worked very hard this
year. Your team only lost one
game. You finished the year in
second place.
How do you feel? (respond
in your head)
Sailors
from 1B
grabbed a steal that made it to
Neece at the other end for an
easy bucket.
Junior post Gabe Simington
Fishing
from 1B
caught over the years.
Tags can be turned in to any
POS agent or at any ODFW
office located throughout the
state. The tags also can be
mailed to any ODFW office.
W INTER STEELHEAD : WATER
DEPENDENT
This time of year, water
conditions for winter steelhead
of th game until foul trouble for the Viks
late in the game provided the Bulldogs
with extra scoring opportunities in the
final stretch.
While North Bend was able to tie the
game at 8-8 and 10-10 midway through
the first period, the Vikings took the lead
on back-to-back buckets from seniors
Jake Hickson and Kyle King, and soph-
omore Caleb Hennessee for a 21-14
advantage to end the period.
King was the first to score in the sec-
ond quarter as the Viks went on to
outscore the Bulldogs 12-11 in the peri-
od and maintain a 33-27 lead entering
the half.
In the opening minutes of the third
period, the Viks and Bulldogs essential-
ly traded baskets, with senior guard
Jared Brandt leading Siuslaw’s offense
inside the paint.
Hickson and King continued to pene-
trate the Bulldog defense, but North
Bend got hot from beyond the arc, tying
the game for the first time of the half at
41-41 with a 3-pointer.
An offensive rebound by King, fol-
lowed by a freethrow in the last 21 sec-
onds of the period from Hennessee gave
Siuslaw a small 44-41 cushion to start
the final period.
North Bend scored first, pulling with-
in 1 point, but an offensive board from
King and a basket from Brandt extended
the Viks’ advantage to 5 points with 5:10
on the clock.
However, the Bulldogs soon entered
the bonus, getting a trip to the charity
line with each foul.
In the final minutes, the Bulldogs
outscored the Viks 14-5, with 7 of those
points coming from the foul line as
3 B
North Bend slipped by with the win, 55-
53.
That same night, Marshfield beat
Douglas 49-33, and Brookings-Harbor
defeated South Umpqua, 49-37.
At 0-4, the Viks finished the first half
of the league season last night at home
against South Umpqua (after press dead-
lines) and will kick off the second half of
league next Friday (Feb. 2) at
Marshfield.
Tipoff begins with the girls’ game at 6
p.m., followed by the boys’ match-up at
7:30 p.m.
Team B — The season has
finally ended. Once again, you
only won one game and fin-
ished next to last place.
How do you feel? (again
respond in your head)
Most of you probably
responded with positive feel-
ings for Team A and not so feel
good as a member of Team B.
What if I told you there were
only two teams in the league.
They played only one game and
Team A lost the game. The
actual standings would be
Team B 1-0 and Team A 0-1.
Try and rationalize why you
responded the way you did.
Most people like winners and
the feelings that come with the
victory.
Many, but not all sports fans,
will “jump on the bandwagon”
of a winning team.
As a freshman on the 1966-
67 Warrenton High School JV
basketball team, we went unde-
feated. As our winning streak
continued, we played with larg-
er and larger crowds.
Unfortunately, the varsity
was not winning. By season’s
end some fans were leaving
after our game. Fan support
grew for us and not for the var-
sity.
My junior basketball season,
we won only three games and
often to small crowds.
Where was the love?
All you need to test this the-
ory is to compare the atten-
dance records of the Siuslaw
and Mapleton football teams
during the past decade.
You could also check the
attendance for any of our local
sports teams to see the differ-
ence during winning and losing
seasons.
Regardless of the final score,
our athletes and coaches are
working hard to be successful.
They try to win and deserve our
vocal support at their contests.
If you have time on your
hands (and who doesn’t, rght?)
go to some games and support
the Vikings and Sailors as they
battle to win.
was the next to score, followed
by a freethrow from freshman
point guard JJ Neece for a 39-25
lead heading into the fourth quar-
ter.
“I was proud of the way our
guys shut McKenzie down and
came back to get control of the
game,” Wolgamott said.
The Sailors were well in con-
trol of the final period, maintain-
ing at least a 10-point lead
throughout the quarter with scor-
ing from Wells, Moso, Simington
and Nate Neece.
Wells led scoring with 14
points, followed by 12 points
each from Moso and Neece.
The win broke a five-game
losing streak for the Sailors, who
will host a re-match with Siletz
Valley next Thursday (Feb. 1)
Wolgamott was optimistic that
the team had a good chance of
finishing the regular season
strong.
“When we play focused and
execute like that, we can compete
with anyone in the league,”
Wolgamott said. “We are looking
forward to seeing what we can do
from here.”
Tipoff for Thursday’s game at
Mapleton High School is set for 6
p.m.
Town, Coffenbury, Lost and
Sunset lakes were stocked with
“trophy” rainbow trout in late
September.
Cedar Creek Hatchery has
stocked over 160 surplus sum-
mer steelhead in Town Lake
near Pacific City so far this
fall.
These fish get fairly active
in the lake and offer a unique
fishing experience. Once in the
lake they are considered
“trout” and do not require a
Combined Angling Tag.
Anglers are reminded, how-
ever, that only one trout per
day over 20-inches may be
retained, and these fish will all
be in that size range.
the year but there still should
be fish around to catch.
ALSEA RIVER: Steelhead,
Chinook
Fall Chinook fishing is slow
to fair. Anglers are reminded
that there is no wild coho
salmon retention.
A few winter steelhead are
starting to be caught in the
lower river.
plugs or divers and bait, or
casting spinners can all be
effective methods.
The first winter steelhead
was reported on the Wilson,
but it's still early and fishing is
slow. Drift fishing baits or
bobber fishing with jigs,
beads, or bait are all good
techniques.
fishing can vacillate between
too low and clear, and too high
and muddy. Successful anglers
will:
1) adjust their gear and tack-
le for current conditions,
and/or
2) be ready to hit the water
when water conditions
improve — usually once water
levels start to drop after a good
rain. Check out the zone
reports for the best weekend
possibilities.
SIUSLAW RIVER: Steelhead,
Chinook
A few winter steelhead are
starting to be caught in the
lower river.
Fall Chinook fishing has
been slowing down, but a few
fish are still available. Anglers
are reminded that there is no
wild coho salmon retention.
NORTH COAST LAKES:
Trout stocking is complete
for the year. Cape Meares,
Boys & Girls Club of Western
Lane County
We are looking for volunteers to help with
• Elementary tutoring, mentoring and program assistance
• Teen Center tutoring, mentoring and program assistance
• Club van and bus drivers
1601 15th St. • Florence, OR. 97439
541-902-0304
Florence Food Share
Ask us about volunteer opportunities.
2190 Spruce Street • P.O.Box 2514
Florence, Oregon 97439
(541) 997-9110
info@fl orencefoodshare.org
Habitat for Humanity
Volunteers needed for new home construction,
home repairs, general
offi ce work, public relations and program administration. Join an
operating committee and help Habitat help others!
Call 541-902-9227 or e-mail to fl orencehabitat@gmail.com
Offi ce located at 2004 HWY 101, Florence
MID COAST LAKES:
Volunteer
Get
involved
Donate
Do your part and
volunteer today
to help support
these local non-proft
organizations in
our community!
Olalla Reservoir has been
stocked with about 100 surplus
summer steelhead this season.
These fish get fairly active in
the lake and offer a unique
fishing experience.
Once in the lake they are
considered “trout” and do not
require a Combined Angling
Tag.
Anglers are reminded, how-
ever, that only one trout per
day over 20 inches may be
retained, and these fish will all
be in that size range.
Mid coast lakes been
stocked with trout throughout
the spring.
Trout stocking has ended for
SALMON RIVER:
Steelhead, Chinook
The Salmon River IS open
for wild and hatchery steel-
head. Wild winter steelhead
can be retained on the Salmon
River. Daily and annual bag
limit on wild winter steelhead
are 1 per day and 3 per year.
Fall Chinook fishing has
been slowing down, but a few
fish are still available.
SILETZ RIVER: Steelhead,
Chinook
A few winter steelhead are
starting to be caught in the
lower river.
Fall Chinook fishing has
been slowing down, but a few
fish are still available. Anglers
are reminded that there is no
wild coho salmon retention.
WILSON RIVER: Chinook,
steelhead
Fall Chinook fishing is slow
to fair. There should be fish
available throughout the sys-
tem. Bobber fishing bait,
back-bouncing, back-trolling
Helping Hands Coalition
Assisting those in need in our Community.
Free Hot Meals Mon-Wed-Fri • 12:30 AM - 1:30 PM
New Life Lutheran Church, 2100 Spruce St, next to Foodshare
Call 541-997-5057 to Volunteer
Meals on Wheels and Cafe 60
Meals on Wheels are available to people over the age of 60 who cannot get
out much due to illness or advanced age and who are not eating properly,
regardless of income. Cafe 60 is available for those who prefer to make new
friends in a dining room setting.
1570 Kingwood, PO Box 2313, Florence
541-997-5673
laneseniormeals.org
Peace Harbor Volunteers
45%
OFF Implants NOW
FREE CONSULTATION
See the
DentureMaster’s
difference, we do
it all right here!
Dr. James Ridley,DDS
206 Nopal Street
Florence, OR 97439
CALL NOW
541-997-6226
Join the Peace Harbor Hospital Volunteers, you will fi nd an area
of interest in a caring organization.
400 9th Street, Florence
541-997-8412 ext. 2218
Us Too Florence
Saving men one PSA test at a time. “Someone to talk to...who understands!”
541-997-6626
maribob@oregonfast.net
www.ustoofl orence.org
To include your organization in
this directory,
please call us @ 541-997-3441
Let Paul show you a new car or truck.
Stop by today!
2150 Hwy. 101 • Florence
(541) 997-3475 • 1-800-348-3475
YAQUINA RIVER:
Steelhead, Chinook
The Big Elk IS open for
wild and hatchery steelhead.
Wild winter steelhead can
be retained on the Big Elk.
Daily and annual bag limit on
wild winter steelhead are 1 per
day and 3 per year.
Fall Chinook fishing has
been slowing down, but a few
fish are still available.
Anglers are reminded that
there is no wild coho salmon
retention.
P ACIFIC H ALIBUT
All 2017 sport halibut fish-
eries have concluded.
Allocations for 2018 will be
announced soon.
For more information, see
the sport halibut webpage.
S HORE AND E STUARY FISHING
Shore and estuary anglers
may fish for surfperch, flatfish
species like starry flounder and
sanddabs, and baitfish (her-
ring, for example).
Due to inseason regulation
changes, anglers may NOT
catch or retain lingcod, any
species of rockfish, cabezon,
greenling, or other bottomfish
species except for flatfish
species like sanddab and starry
flounder.
Surfperch fishing is not
impacted by this closure, and
remains open.
Public piers provide oppor-
tunities to catch surfperch and
baitfish and to drop crab pots
(but check first for crab health
safety closures).
Learn about surfperch fish-
ing.
When fishing from shore or
inside estuaries and bays, it is
important to check the tide.
Many fish that swim into
estuaries and bays, including
salmon, surfperch, and Pacific
herring, tend to come in with
the tide.
Catch of these species is
more likely to occur closer to
slack tide.
Additionally, the accessibili-
ty of some areas can be com-
pletely dependent on the tide.
Do not allow the incoming tide
to become a safety hazard.
W ARMWATER F ISHING —
South Coast
The south coast area extends
along the Oregon coast from
Yachats south to the Oregon-
California border.
The area offers some of the
most productive and scenic
warmwater fishing in the state
with excellent fishing for bass
and panfish available.