The Siuslaw news. (Florence, Lane County, Or.) 1960-current, January 17, 2018, WEDNESDAY EDITION, Page 4A, Image 4

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    4 A
❘
WEDNESDAY EDITION
❘ JANUARY 17, 2018
Siuslaw News
P.O. Box 10
Florence, OR 97439
NED HICKSON , EDITOR
Opinion
Problems and solutions for the OCHS
M
y wife and I moved to
Florence in 2015 from
Arizona, where I had
retired ten years earlier from
PetsMart working out of corpo-
rate and store management. One
of the first things I wanted to do
here was use some of my skills
helping local groups working
with dog and cat adoptions.
After checking out the
Oregon Coast Humane Society
(OCHS), I kept running into
angry people who had issues
with the way it was being run.
So I started digging into what
was really going on. I attended
the November meeting and was
overwhelmed with the anger in
the room. I had seen this before
and the outcome has never been
good.
I took a tour of the shelter and
I have to say the place was
incredibly clean and the person-
nel were very friendly. From
there, I went to the OCHS Thrift
Shop and again I found incredi-
ble people, but also that it was
very short of volunteers.
The elephant in the room is
the question of “did this board
create an unhealthy environment
for the dogs and cats passing
through its doors each day?”
My answer is no, and there
are independent inspections to
bear this out.
I went through the entire list
of complaints from submitted by
concerned members, item by
item.
Being in the pet business as
long as I had, I realize that every
living creature has different
needs. Can they get it perfect
every time?
Of course not.
That’s why we re-analyze
every issue and make custom
changes to meet each incident.
In the November meeting, the
board was offered many sugges-
tions about care and some were
even administered. However, in
the end, it is really up to the ones
serving on the board to make the
final decisions.
In fact, I believe every issue
has been addressed with the
exception of doing away with
the current board and members
of the shelter’s management.
As a recent board member no
longer serving on the board, I’d
like to suggest what I think is
best for OCHS and the animals
entrusted to its care.
tion.
In other words, they have to
transport the washed items to
another location to be dried.
Power usage is almost at its limit
and blows fuses under heavy
demand.
4) Food storage at the shelter
is inside a very large metal ship-
ping container. In the past, there
have been rat issues. But several
GUEST VIEWPOINT
B Y G REG C ARLTON
RECENT O REGON C OAST H UMANE S OCIETY BOARD MEMBER
Problems:
1) First, a property review:
After walking through the
shelter and thrift store, it’s obvi-
ous both facilities have poor
building conditions. The layout
at the shelter is simply wrong for
the cats upstairs and the dogs
below.
The facility isn’t ADA
(American Disability Act) com-
pliant, and with the population
of our area leaning so heavily
toward seniors, it fails to provide
many of them the opportunity to
view kittens housed upstairs.
Also, the dog kennels are
very small and need to be
enlarged.
But the biggest problem is
there are only 22 dog kennels
with no room to expand.
2) The thrift store consists of
two different buildings and nei-
ther are ADA friendly. One
building was built in 1932 and
still has part of the same plumb-
ing, no heat to speak of, and is in
dire need of a complete over-
haul.
Given those conditions, I
think the employees and volun-
teers have done an incredible job
of making the place work.
3) The laundry rooms in two
different locations; there are
three non-commercial washers
in one room and three non-com-
mercial dryers in another loca-
months ago, five large metal
lock boxes were installed that
would stop a dinosaur from
breaking them open.
However, it is still damp in
the container and a new building
is needed to help with food stor-
age.
Solutions:
1) Stop investing in unusable
properties and begin the search
for a location that could support
a larger, more suitable facility
that meets OCHS’s needs.
Getting grants is almost
impossible when we do not own
the property, and wasting money
on the current facility is not a
solution and
2) Create an opportunity for
another veterinarian in Florence
that will work part-time at the
shelter and be willing to partici-
pate in a low-cost spay/neuter
clinic.
3) Hire an executive director
to oversee operations and out-
reach.
4) Hold board elections
ASAP to bring the next board in
compliance with the Oregon
Department of Justice’s instruc-
tions.
Operations:
It wasn’t long ago that the
shelter was going to have to
close its doors for lack of funds;
the fund raising didn’t meet the
needs of operations.
In recent months OCHS has
received some very large gifts
and I’m sure everyone is asking
when and what the money is
going to be spent on
Answering that question
requires addressing the second
“elephant in the room.”
The OCHS been damaged
from all the posturing by some
of its unhappy members. There
is no filtering of facts on social
media and the board remained
quiet because of legal advice.
Almost daily, there are people
on social media saying the pres-
ent board is not honest. These
angry remarks have nothing to
do with the board’s service.
Instead, it only demonstrates
personal revenge being taken on
certain people.
As a result, the OCHS has
lost volunteers.
That being said, I want noth-
ing to do with the past because
we can only change what’s hap-
pening now and the future.
The board is committed to re-
installing membership voting
that was abandoned
long
before this board took office.
I’ve met with some community
leaders and they are concerned
with what is happening at the
shelter and how it affects our
community.
I hope with all my heart the
community will come together
and support OCHS by becoming
a member and voting for what’s
right.
Anger has no place around
helpless animals.
Ask the hard question to
those who will be running for
the board: What is the future
plan for OCHS and how can you
make it work for the benefit of
the animals and community?
(Editor’s Note: Viewpoint
submissions on this and other
topics are always welcome as
part of our goal to encourage
community discussion and
exchange of perspectives.)
LETTERS
G O BACK TO PAPER BAGS TO
AVOID ‘P LASTIC O CEAN ’
I just attended the documentary film “A
Plastic Ocean” and read Siuslaw News
editor Ned Hickson’s opinion piece
regarding plastic.
I agree plastic is sufficating all of us. I
just don’t know how to get our coastal
communities to pass local legislation to
ban plastic straws, plastic bags and plastic
bottles so we can reduce our stamp on the
ocean.
Maybe we can go back to paper bags,
paper straws and glass bottles?
Regarding water bottles, having grown
up in Oregon I found it crazy when I was
a teen that anyone would purchase bottled
water versus tap water. Oregon has the
best water and maybe publishing monthly
“Things You Should Know” could help
those moving here from other states to
learn that the tap water will be better than
bottled water.
They could learn that those bottles have
estrogen growth contaminates, whereas a
glass of water from the tap doesn’t.
And banning plastic bags, not all bags,
would be helpful and should be looked
into.
—Catherine Caudle
Dunes City
F LORENCE MUST ACT
LOCALLY , THINK GLOBALLY
In response to the letter by Mayor Joe
Henry (“Focusing on Local Issues has
Broader Impact,” Jan. 13), one of our city
goals is Livability and Quality of Life. We
are obviously a coastal community,
dependent on tourism, business and being
a popular place for people to retire.
Our climate, clean air and water are
very important to all the above. One of the
most important factors affecting these
issues is global warming. We must, as
individuals and as a community, come
together to recognize that global warming
and climate change can destroy civiliza-
tion as we know it.
Over 95 percent of environmental sci-
entists agree about this dire problem.
However, our Mayor declined to partici-
pate in the EMAC effort concerning glob-
al warming because he believes that its
purpose is partisan in nature.
Additionally, he said he does not think
he can have much impact on global warm-
ing.
I wonder if he doesn’t understand the
idea of thinking globally and acting local-
ly?
—Ron Preisler
Florence City Councilor
C LIMATE CHANGE IS
A CONSTANT , NOT A CRISIS
In reference to Michael Allen’s letter
(“Climate Change Underreported by
Local Media,” Jan. 10), in my opinion
Climate Change is actually over-reported
by all media.
“Unstoppable Global Warming: Every
1,500 Years” by Singer and Avery, first
published in 2007, gives ample evidence
the climate is in constant change. The cli-
mate changes as our solar system passes
through the radial arms of the Milky Way
Galaxy due to change in cosmic ray lev-
els.
The interactions affecting climate are
complex and some are still unknown.
Pinning it solely on CO2 is risible but
readily swallowed by the ill-educated.
None of the computer projections for
the past 20 years are even close to actual
changes; none of the computer models are
remotely capable of running in reverse
from today to model the weather as docu-
mented over the last several hundred
years; and no species has gone extinct
from climate change in the past 20 years.
Alarmists invent nonsensical terms like
“local extinction” to describe natural and
normal migration as animals adapt.
Cold weather kills more people than
warm air; food grows better in warm,
CO2-rich environments.
Polar bears will survive. They last
adapted by changing their teeth 10,000 to
20,000 years ago in response to the last
ice age. Their DNA is intermingled with
their brown bear ancestors with whom
they have mated over millennia when
driven landward in prehistoric warmings.
Climate change is constant and merits
as much ink as sunrise and sunset.
— Ian Eales
Florence
M EDICAID FUNDING IMPOR -
TANT FOR OUR COMMUNITY
I recently relocated to Florence and am
getting accustomed to my new home. I
love it here and want to stay for the
remainder of my career and into retire-
ment. I am a family physician and have
already seen the impact that Oregon
Medicaid makes in our community. It
funds care for disabled individuals and
supplements the care for lower-income
seniors.
If Measure 101 fails, I believe there
would be a significant negative impact on
the overall health of our community. For
instance, I have a patient with severe res-
piratory illness. Because he has Medicaid,
he is able to see me for treatment before
he becomes critically ill.
This certainly saved money as it pre-
vents potential hospitalization.
A majority of my patients are retired
seniors who do not have an income other
than retirement savings. Without supple-
mental Medicaid, many of them would
not be able to afford needed assisted liv-
ing facilities and memory care. They
would instead be living in their homes and
would decline rapidly.
The favorite part of my job is providing
care to women and children. I love obstet-
rics and newborn care. Medicaid helps
fund care for pregnant women and young
children, which supports healthy mothers
and babies. It also assures access to pre-
ventative services like mammographies
and cervical cancer screenings.
Medicaid funding is important for our
community, so I will be voting “yes” on
Measure 101.
— Jacquelyn L. Serrano,
MD, MPH, FAAFP
Florence
See
LETTERS 5A
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Send letters to:
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WHERE TO WRITE
Pres. Donald Trump
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
NW
Washington, D.C. 20500
Comments: 202-456-1111
Switchboard: 202-456-1414
FAX: 202-456-2461
TTY/TDD Comments:
202-456-6213
www.whitehouse.gov
Gov. Kate Brown
160 State Capitol
900 Court St.
Salem, Ore. 97301-4047
Governor’s Citizens’ Rep.
Message Line:
503-378-4582
www.oregon.gov/gov
U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden
221 Dirksen Senate Office
Bldg
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-5244
541-431-0229
www.wyden.senate.gov
U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley
313 Hart Senate Office
Bldg
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-3753/FAX: 202-
228-3997
541-465-6750
www.merkley.senate.gov
U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio
( 4 th Dist.)
2134 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
202-225-6416
541-269-2609
541-465-6732
www.defazio.house.gov
State Sen. Arnie Roblan
( Dist. 5 )
900 Court St. NE - S-417
Salem, OR 97301
503-986-1705
FAX: 503-986-1080
Email: Sen.ArnieRoblan@
state.or.us
State Rep. Caddy
McKeown
( Dist. 9 )
900 Court St. NE
Salem, OR 97301
503-986-1409
Email: rep.caddymckeown
@state.or.us
West Lane County
Commissioner
Jay Bozievich
125 E. Eighth St.
Eugene, OR 97401
541-682-4203
FAX: 541-682-4616
Email:
Jay.Bozievich@
co.lane.or.us