The Siuslaw news. (Florence, Lane County, Or.) 1960-current, June 06, 2015, SATURDAY EDITION, Page 7A, Image 7

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    SIUSLAW NEWS ❚ SATURDAY, JUNE 6, 2015
J OEL F UHRMAN , MD
Preventing osteoporosis
The National Osteoporosis
Foundation estimates that 50
percent of women and 25 per-
cent of men, over the age of 50,
will have an osteoporosis-relat-
ed fracture during their life-
time.
The best protection against
osteoporosis is a combination
of weight-bearing exercise and
excellent nutrition.
Bone strength is directly
related to muscle strength. The
most effective way to strength-
en bone and protect against
osteoporosis-related fractures
is by increasing muscle
strength.
Weight-bearing exercises are
ideal for improving balance
and building bone strength.
While swimming and biking
are good for cardiovascular
conditioning, they will not help
protect against osteoporosis
like running or lifting weights
can.
In women, who are at a risk
for osteoporosis, back strength-
ening exercises are especially
beneficial and can provide last-
ing protection against spinal
fractures. For women, in addi-
tion to doing weight-bearing
exercises, I also recommend
wearing a weighted vest for a
few hours each day for stronger
bones.
A weighted vest can be
worn, not only during exercise,
but also while you work or
shop and bend, stand, and
move throughout the day.
Wearing a weighted vest has
other benefits as well, such as
burning more calories, increas-
ing core strength and stabiliz-
ing muscles, thus improving
balance and decreasing the risk
of falls.
Certain foods supply the
body with the nutrients neces-
sary to build and maintain
healthy, strong bones. Other
foods promote the breakdown
of bone and osteoporosis. The
best foods for bone health are
whole plant foods.
Studies show that individu-
als with the highest consump-
tion of fruit and vegetables
have the strongest bones, and
bone health-promoting effects
of flavonoids, plum/prune
polyphenols and additional
phytochemicals are now being
investigated.
Greens, seeds, and beans are
healthful calcium sources. A
diet full of natural plant foods
provides the calcium required
to build strong bones.
Green vegetables in particu-
lar are rich calcium sources.
Welcome to 80 Years of Excellence!
For example, one four-ounce
serving of steamed kale has just
as much calcium as one cup of
milk.
Broccoli, bok choy, sesame
seeds, and garbanzo beans are
also excellent calcium sources.
Furthermore, the body absorbs
about 50 percent of the calcium
in green vegetables, compared
to only 32 percent of the calci-
um in milk.
Green vegetables contain
vitamin K, which is a crucial
component for maintaining
healthy bones.
Higher intake vitamin K1 is
associated with bone health,
and in supplementation trials
using vitamin K2 (which is low
in plant foods), fracture risk
was greatly reduced.
It is important to get both K1
from green vegetables, and
likely beneficial for those
whose diets do not contain K2
naturally to consume additional
K2 from a supplement.
Nuts and seeds are rich in
magnesium, an essential miner-
al, which is used for the forma-
tion of bone tissue.
For most people following a
Nutritarian diet, maintenance
of bone mass, muscle mass and
muscle strength with age can
be achieved easily with a
Nutritarian diet that includes
seeds, nuts and beans.
For healthy bones, it is
important to ensure adequate
protein intake in mid-life and
especially after the age of 70.
Although this is routinely
accomplished with protein-rich
plant foods, animal products
may be added if muscle mass
starts to fall too low on a com-
pletely vegan diet.
Phytate, present in beans,
whole grains, nuts and seeds, is
known as an “anti-nutrient,” a
substance that prevents us from
absorbing certain minerals,
however the phytate in many
plant foods might actually ben-
efit bone health.
Studies have found that
women who consume more
phytate had either greater bone
mineral density or less bone
mass loss.
Phytate appears to help to
prevent osteoporosis by pre-
venting bone breakdown by
bone-resorbing cells.
The worst foods for bone
health are foods that promote
calcium loss:
• Salt promotes the excretion
of calcium in the urine.
Caffeine also contributes to
urinary calcium loss. High caf-
feine intake is associated with
increased bone loss and osteo-
porotic fractures.
• Soda, including diet and
decaffeinated soda, is associat-
ed with bone loss. Soda con-
sumption increases parathyroid
hormone (PTH) in the blood,
which increases blood calcium
www.shoppelocal.biz
concentrations by stimulating
bone
breakdown.
This
increased blood calcium is then
excreted in the urine.
In Osteoporosis Protection
for Life, I have put together a
comprehensive approach that
combines dietary advice, sup-
plements and special bone-
strengthening exercises, which
can
provide
significant
improvements — when com-
pared to drug treatment — for
osteopenia and osteoporosis.
This DVD provides the
information that is needed to
put an effective osteoporosis
prevention plan into place and
take action.
Just a few minutes a day, or
15 minutes twice a week, is all
that it takes to complete the
exercises that can keep your
bones strong-for life.
Dr. Fuhrman is a New York
Times best-selling author and
board certified family physician
specializing in lifestyle and nutri-
tional medicine.
Visit his website at Dr
Fuhrman.com, or submit questions
and comments to news ques-
tions@drfuhrman.com.
We Make All Our Own Ice Cream
– Over 50 Flavors –
Including
Sugar-free Ice Cream & Non-fat Frozen Yogurt
in a variety of flavors.
Herbalists to hear from Food Share president
“Over 5 Generations of
Old Fashioned Goodness!”
Florence Food Share does
more than distribute 50,000
pounds of food every month.
At the next Florence Herb
Enthusiasts meeting, set for
Thursday, June 18, at 11 a.m.
at New Life Lutheran Church,
2100 Spruce St., Food Share
president Bart Mealer will
share information about the
history, growth and progress of
this vital program in Florence.
In 1980, a grass roots effort
to help provide emergency
food to Florence area residents
was put together by a group of
Tw o l o c a t i o n s i n F l o r e n c e
H i g h w a y 1 0 1 N & B a y S t r e e t i n O l d To w n
Wa l d p o r t • W i n c h e s t e r B a y • A s h l a n d • S i s t e r s
SIUSLAW
WATERSHED
CAMPS
Sign-up for fun, learning, and adventure this
summer! We are still accepting applications
for the Siuslaw Watershed Camps! Visit
www.siuslaw.org/camps for more info and to
download an application. Hurry, spaces are
fi lling up!
Buying or Selling? I can help.
INTRODUCTORY CAMP:  June 22 – June
25, For students entering 4th-6th grades
INTERMEDIATE CAMP: July 7 – July 10, For students entering 6th-
8th grades
ADVAN CED CAMP:   July 13 – July 17, For students entering 8th-
12th grades, with previous watershed education experience
Travel throughout the Siuslaw and Coastal Lakes watersheds exploring
the streams, lakes, estuary, and forests. And make a diff erence with
hands-on restoration activities.
739 Kingwood St – Cute, move in ready, in-town
home with open floor plan, living room with slider,
master bedroom with large closets, washer, dryer
and newer appliances included. Oversized garage
and RV parking with hookups. Seller will pay up to
$2,500 in closing costs! $135,000. #2441-
15490110
Siuslaw Watershed Camps are made possible by support from
the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Western Lane
Community FoundaƟ on, the Siuslaw SD Twilight Program,
and monetary and in-kind donaƟ ons from local agencies,
businesses and individuals.
WORD
Chris Bunch
Principal Broker /
Property Manager
541 997-8877
1749 Highway 101 • 541-997-1200
ON THE
STREET
HAVE A QUESTION WE SHOULD ASK?
E MAIL : E DITOR @T HE S IUSLAW N EWS . COM
What advice would you give to this year’s graduates?
“Follow your dreams and
accomplish your goals by choos-
ing your own path to follow.”
—A NTHONY G ARCIA , 12
G ILCHREST , O RE .
“You don’t have to have it all
figured out right now.”
—F LORENCE F IRST C ITIZEN
C INDY W OBBE , 53
F LORENCE
“Be true to your self and
follow your dream”
—M IKE B ONNELL , 72
F LORENCE
“Continue your learning
experience, which opens the
whole future to you, and that of
the whole country. One day, the
country will depend on you.”
—H ARLEY Y OUNGBLOOD , 87
F LORENCE
DISCLAIMER: The opinions expressed above are solely those of the contributors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Siuslaw News or its advertisers.
More than 30 children die every day in the US
from unintentional accidents according to the
Pediatrics Journal. So, parents please be
vigilant & well informed. Have a safe summer
vacation & hug that child of yours.
Coast Real Estate
100 Hwy. 101, Florence, OR 97439
Cell: 541-999-7317
diana@cbcoast.com
COURTESY PHOTO
Food Share president Bart
Mealer in the 10,000-
square-foot Food Share
garden.
local churches and operated
out of people’s garages and car
trunks.
Since then, the population
has doubled and the need has
increased accordingly. In 1994,
Florence Food Share moved to
its permanent home at 2190
Spruce St., on land leased from
New Life Lutheran Church.
Mealer will touch on several
points, followed by a tour of
the 10,000-square-foot garden
with 42 raised garden beds.
Learn more about Food
Share’s client demographics,
why the garden exists and its
history, what plant choices
they make for the garden and
why, quantities produced, and
volunteer labor.
Of particular interest is its
use of rain catchment, irriga-
tion system, special water
metering, and how its creates
and uses compost.
Florence Herb Enthusiasts
meet the third Thursday of the
month. To learn more about
Florence Food Share and how
its garden grows, come to the
June 18 meeting. Guests are
welcome to attend their first
meeting free.
Annual dues are $10.
For more information, call
Robert
McGlauflin
at
541-513-1745 or Jacquie
Beveridge at 541-997-8311.
Whether you are a novice,
professional or in-between
herbalist, join us to expand
your knowledge of the useful
plants.
Visit the Siuslaw News
online at
WWW.THESIUSLAWNEWS.COM
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