Corvallis gazette. (Corvallis, Benton County, Or.) 1900-1909, January 31, 1902, Page 4, Image 4

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    FROM SONGS OF TWO.
We thought when Love at last should
com
The rose would lose its thorn.
And every lip bat Joy's be dumb
When Lore, sweet Lore, was born;
That never tears should start to rise.
No night o'ertake our morn.
Nor any guests of grief surprise
When Lore, sweet Love, was born.
And when be came, O Heart of mine!
And stood within oar door.
No joy our dreaming could divine
Was missing from his store.
The thorns shall wound our hearts
again.
But not the fear of yore.
For all the guests or grief and pain
Shall serve him evermore.
Arthur Sherburne Hardy.
cjj$ HE heat rolled up In waves from
tbe sun-soaked land into an at
inosphere already surcharged
with beat. For a number of hours tbe
birds bad ceased song and. twitter. The
sharp cbr-r-r of the grasshoppers and
the steady click, click of the harvester
seemed to voice the misery caused by
tbe stilling air. Not the slightest breeze
ruffled tbe broad expanse of rippned
wheat; not a motion except of men,
machine and horses. White streaks of
lather showed on the horses wherever
touched by a strap of leather, and
though they lagged miserably at their
work the driver was too enervated by
the heat to urge them to a livelier
gait.
A tall, broad-shouldered young man
walked toward the team and held up
one hand with a gesture of command.
"Take the horses. Mart, and put them
In the shadow of the barn; they'll get
sunstruck If you don't look out. We'll
quit, all of us, until It cools off a lit
tle." He walked slowly toward the. bouse
and threw himself down In the shade
of the porch The other men lounged
in the shadow of the barn.
"Good thing Jeff Cooper thinks some
thing of his hosses," muttered Mart.
AT HIS FEET LAI HILDA.
"He don't care for anything but what
costs him money. No wonder his wife
left him."
"Where did she go?" asked one of the
men, lazily.
"Nobody knows, unless she went
back to her folks."
"What did she go for?" questioned
tbe man again.
"Got tired of workln' like a beast. I
guess. All Jeff married her for was to
work. She used to milk the cows, take
care of tbe hosses and do most all the
chores, then go into the field and work.
She drove the team all through har
vestln' last summer."
"She was a Swede, wasn't she?"
"Yes; a strong, red-cheeked young
woman, with big blue eyes, and.oair
just tbe color of that wheat field down
there. A young Swede was workin'
for Jeff, and they left about the same
time; guess there ain't much doubt "
"It's a lie!"
The men Jumped and turned to look
Into Jeff Cooper's white angry face. He
was trembling, but bis voice was cool
and steady.
"My wife never left with any man; It
was not like her. No better, truer
woman ever lived, and any man who
dares to say anything different may an
swer to me." He clenched a pair of
huge lists and looked at Mart, who did
not answer for a moment, then he
asked,
"What did she go away for, then,
and where Is she?"
"1 don't know: but I know that when
I find her she will be as good and pure
as a little child."
"Pity you hadn't 'predated her a lit
tle more when you had her." returned
Mart, scornfully. " 'Most always if a
man thinks anything of his wife be
don't set her to woikiu' outdoors, like
a man."
"1 never wanted her to work out
doors. She liked to 'tend the horses
and drive them, to sit on the harvester
and watch the wheat fall. I did every
thing fot her that 1 could. You thought
when you built a mud house for your
wife that you had done wonders; I
built a frame house for mine, and put
a porch on it. when every board in It
cost me most a bag of wheat, and that
at the railroad twenty miles away."
"Look! "Look!" Interrupted one of
the men. "A cyclone!"
The men jumped to their feet. They
could hear tbe distant roar coming
nearer and nearer, and all earth and
the heavens seemed filled with the
gathering fury.
"It's going south of us," said Mart,
hopefully.
"There's enough of it coming here.
Get tbe horses Into the cellar, quick!"
commanded Jeff, running as he spoke
to the horses, that stood pulling at their
baiters, their sensitive ears pricked for
ward as they scented the coming tor
nado. In a moment men and horses
were In the cyclone cellar and the
heavy door bolted. Through the thick
earth banking they could hear the
crash as the cyclone struck.
"It's a big one." said Mart; "if we
get the whole of It you won't see your
house, barn, harvester or wheat unless
you go into another couuty and gather
them up."
Jeff did not answer. He was not
thinking of tbe safety of bis property,
but of his wife. Was she safe out of
the track of the cyclone? How fright
ened she had been tbe summer before,
when Just a slight cycloue Lad passed
through his fields! How she had clung
to him In the darkness aud perfect
safety of the cellar! He could still
THE THRILLING
m if ii ai i ... . .i.. ii 'ii m in:iur r.
The "cycle whirl" is the latest sensation of the bicycle world, says the New
York Journal. This apparatus makes it possible to hold bicycle races on the
stage of a theater. In fact, there are two pursuit races daily at a. New York
theater, in which several noted stars of the cycling world take part. '
The men whirl around the basin with almost incredible speed. So steep is
the track banked that the men appear to defy the laws of gravitation. To the
spectators they seem to be riding around a picket fence slightly tilted. In order
to cover a mile the cyclist has to make between 125 and 150 laps. When two are
going at full speed they present the appearance of two, colored streaks flying
around with lightning speed.
"Dare Devil" Schreyer of mile-a-mlnute fame, and King and Samnelson.
known as the "hobo" team in the recent six-day bicycle race at New York, are
among the men who risk their lives daily giving exhibitions in the "wooden bowl."
It takes skill of no mean order to race in' this latest evolution of the bicycle
track. .
feel her strong, young heart beating
wildly against bis own as she clung
to him in an agony of fear aud dread.
Why bad she left him? He had asked
himself the question hundreds of times
since she had left him three months
ago. He suspected that she bad gone
home: It was only fourteen miles away,
but he was too proud to make any
search for her. Surely she would come
back some time! Mart's words burned
his ears, though he did ' not believe
their evil suggestion.
"It's over, I guess," Mart's voice
broke upon his thoughts.
He went to the door and unbolted it.
It opened outward, and when" he
pushed it struck something that bad
lutun Hnirn ncninst It Tip mishpri n
nine uaiucii iuc uw& wluu a, . l tx,
a ad the man looking over Jeff's shoul
der, said.
"The house's left, for one thing."
They pushed hard against the door
until Jeff could squeeze through. He
looked down at bis feet.
"Hilda!"
At his feet, her long, fair hair swept
about her by the wind, vlay Hilda. One
arm sheltered the baby that Jeff had
never seen; it moved and cried, but
Hilda lay motionless, her white, up
turned face ghastly beueath its coat
lug of dust. Jeff took the baby from
her arms and gave, it to one of the
men: he then stooped to raise Hilda.
Mart sprang forward to help, but Jeff
pushed him asidefi and, unassisted,
carried her to the house and put her
upon the bed. His face was as color
less as hers as he rubbed bis hands
and called her by all the old endear
ing names she had been accustomed to
hear from bis lips.
"No use, Jeff; she's gone; you can't
bring her to," said one of the men, in
the hushed tones one uses in the pres
ence of the dead.
"She is not dead! She must not die!'
contradicted Jeff. ' "Hilda! Hilda!"
There was more determination than
despair in the cry.
"I can feel her pulse," he cried, hope
fully, a few moments later. At last
she opened her eyes, but there was
no look of recognition in them. After
awhile ' the dazed, bewildered expres
sion left her face, and her lips parted
In a smile as she looked at Jeff. He
motioned the men from the room and
dropped upon his knees beside the bed.
"Hilda, how could you leave me
so?"
A troubled look came into the child
like blue eyes.
"They did tell me Mart's woman,
and the others that all you cared for
me was to work. And sometimes I felt
that the work was too bard, so I
thought I would go away till I was
once more strong and could work for
you."
"They lied, Hilda! It was you I
wanted, not your work! Where were
you when the cyclone struck?"
She wrinkli'd her forehead a little in
anxious thought.
"I was home. I' went out with baby,
and i turned this way and walked a
long time; then I saw the cyclone com
ing and was so afraid." She shud
dered, 'and Jeff patted her hand reas
suringly "Then I run. Oh, 1 run
miles, miles! Then the wind took me
up, and then I forget till I saw you,
Jeff."
Mart put his head in at the door.
"The roof of the barn's gone, and the
harvester's missing, and every bundle
ot vhcat's been blowed gal'ay west,
and all that was standln' is fiat. It
was a terrible cyclone, now I tell
you."
Jeff turned a happy face, and said.
"Not a terrible cyclone, a blessed one:
It brought my wife back to me." Farm
and Fireside.
GAMES WITH PAPER
Here is a new game, which is causing a great deal of amusement at social
Kathorings in Europe.
Two boys or young men are blindfolded, and in the right hand of each is
placed a stout roll of paper in the form of a club or cudgel. The players then
have to lie down on the carpet and to "grasp each other by the left hand. There
upon the fun begins.' One of the players asks the other:
"Are you there?"
When the answer "Yes" comes he raises his right hand and strives to hit
with his cudgel the spot where, from the sound of the voice, he supposes the
other player's head to be.
The other player, liowever. is at perfect liberty to move his head after he
has aaswereJ "Yes." and the result is that in nine cases out of ten. the blow
misses his head anj falls on his sbouHers or some other part of his body.
In that case it is his turn to retaliate, and so the game goes on indefinitely,
the sole object of the player who asks the question beiug to strike the other
player's head and that of tbe player who answers to save his head from being .
struck.
"CYCLE WHIRL
PHI
WIT THAT AVERTED A RIOT.
John Brougham's Well-Timed Joke
Calmed a Turbulent Crowd.
"There have been a good many sto
ries told of the quick wit of actors who
have turned an accident or a paoic or
a row into a joke." said Tom Leigh,
the old-time actor. "A good many of
tbe stories are fakes, I suppose.' be
continued, "but some are true, and
there are lots that have never found
their way Into print. The press agent
wasn't as numerous or as clever In the
old days as he Is now.
"I remember an instance in which
John Brougham carried off a most dif
ficult situation by a clever bit of im
provisation and saved the old Winter
Garden from tbe disgrace of a riot. It
was the first night on which he played
his burlesque 'Columbus' there and the
bouse was filled with bis friends.
"Among tbe most enthusiastic of
these friends were a great crowd of
Fenians, headed by Mahoney. the man
who bad just then been elected presi
dent of the Irish republic at the old
Fenian headquarters in 17th street.
There was a jollification In honor of
his election, and as be was a personal
friend of Brougham's It was natural
t't he and his followers should buy
up all the orchestra seats in the house
for the opening night, as they did.
"I was In the cast, and so was Jack
Studly, but if anybody else In tbe com
pany Is now alive I don't remember
who It is. I played tbe part of a big
Indian who first appeared on tbe stage
as a messenger bringing dispatches
from Washington.
"Just as I came on a discussion that
bad sprung up among some of the ex
cited Fenians developed into a quarrel.
The house was already disturbed and
there was every prospect of a fight In
the orchestra In another minute.
"I delivered my message and
Brougham replied to me in tbe words
of the piece:
" 'Confound you. have done!'
"Then turning from me to the foot
lights he went on, as if it was a part
of his speech:
"Or would you like a band of Fenian
brothers,
All fame abandon to defame each other?
If with such sentiments I sent out any,
Kcmember I'm head center here, Ma
honey. "There was a roar of laughter from
the whole house at this, and the Fen
ians joined in it as heartily as any one
else. There was no further talk or
indication of trouble and the play went
on without interruption." New York
Sun.
Had Found His Strong Point.
A member of the bar not richly en
dowed with intellect after years of
brieflessness married a rich widw.
She died. Again be sought a bride
with a large dower and again became
a widower. Then he thought he would
return to bis long neglected profession.
He approached an old friend, who had
meanwhile become a judge of the Su
preme Court, and asked what in bis
opinion would be tbe wisest course for
bim to pursue. "Stick to the probate
and matrimonial." said tbe judge.
Quaint Southern Epitaph.
A Charleston. S. C churchyard con
tains the dust of many eminent men
and several queer epitaphs. The epi
taph of Charlotte Elford, who died on
May 9. 1817, says that
She was
In Childhood, Obedient.
In Wedlock, . Virtuous.
In Prosperity, Humble.
In Adversity, ' Resigned.
In Sickness, Patient.
In Death. Happy.
They now say that bad grammar Is
a disease. We are afraid we have It.
ROLLS AMUSE SOCIETY.
HATED FENIMORE COOPER.
Perpetual War Wad Between An
, tfaor and Village Lads.
Not so. many boys read J. Fen i more
Cooper nowadays as three or four de
cades ago. but If It were- possmie to
have an accounting to-day It would
pretty surely be found that no one.
barring only Captain Marry at, has
pleased and delighted so many lads
withx his stories.
It is more or less of a shock, there
fore, to those who remember him as
one of the chief patron saints of their
boyhood, o learn that In actual life
Cooper., and the boys of bis village
were sworn enemies. N. C. Brewer,
who was one of tbe boys, bnt Is now
an elderly man living in' Cleveland,
gave the world this interesting bit of
personal reminiscence the other day.
He lived at Cooperstown. Otsego Coun
ty. N. when Cooper made his home
there.
"There was not a man in the town
whom tbe boys hated as they did Mr.
Cooper." said Mr. Brewer. "He was a
typical Englishman of tbe austere sort,
surly to boys and very liberal in tbe
use of his walkingstick on their backs
when be got the chance.
"He was probably very Irritable, and
the boys knew this and made matters
worse by going out of their way to
annoy him. We used to get Into bis
orchard and steal bis apples, more for
the pleasure It gave ns to make him
angry than for the sake of the ap
ples. "His manner seemed to indicate to
as that he bad a very exalted sense
of his own importance and that he
thought we boys ought to take off our
hats to him every time we met hitu in
the street. I was about 10 years old
at tbe time and bad not read any of
bis stories.
"Perhaps it may seem odd. but It is
a fact that while I have all his works
in my library. I have never read any
of them, and the only recollections that
I have of him are the boyhood feel
ings of dislike caused by bis manners
and by his treatment of the boys of
Cooperstown. This seems strange when
the fact Is considered' that bis stories
have pleased so many thousands of
boys." New York Sun.
ROYAL INFANT PHOTOGRAPHED
BY QUEEN OF ITALY.
Amatenr photography has entered ou
a sudden revival in Italy since royalty
adopted the fad. Queen Helena is now
one of the most ardent enthusiasm with
the camera and one of tbe most
skillful. N
The snapshot she prides herself most
on Is that she recently obtained of her
Infant daughter, the Princess Yolauda
Marghrita Milena Elisabeth Rowana
Marie Copies of the photograph have
been presented to the women of the
royal court and they are taking up the
camera fashion.
The little princess Is 7 months, old
THE QUEEN AND HEB BAHY.
Her birth was not hailed with great de
light in the palace or among tbe people,
as a male heir was hoped for. but she
has won ber way into papularity and is
enthusiastically cheered wherever she
appears in public. She is a healthy,
vigorous child.
At her birth, the first of last June,
thousands of prisoners were pardoned
and liberated, and all the poor chil
dren of Rome were given dinners in
honor of the little royal maiden. Every
child born in Rome, In Naples and in
the metropolitan provinces on the same
day received from the King and Queen
a complete outfit, a cradle and a sav
ings bank book with $20 to his credit.
An Opportune Gift.
A good-natured, easy-going German
living in Chicago asked bis American
wife to pick out some little present
for his sister in tbe old country. He
bad squandered his fortune, says the
Record-Herald, but bis sister still had
hers, and with careful Teutonic man
agement had swelled it to a comforta
ble sum.
The American wife knew nothing of
ber sister-in-law. and she appreciated
tbe limitations of ber own finances as
well as the difficulty of choosing a gift
for a stranger.' But she went to a
repository for woman's work and dis
covered there a dainty bag of chamois
leather embroidered with wreaths of
forget-me-nots and emblazoned with
the one word "Money." to indicate its
use as a secret purse to be worn about
tbe neck in traveling.
It seemed an Inuocent little gift, but
Fritz danced with delight when he saw
it. "Ach, the very thing!" be cried.
"I would not write, and ask her not
but 'Money and 'forget-me-not, ach.
It Is the most beautiful reminder!"
His wife, who bad not thought of the
matter in that light, protested and
would fain have withheld tbe present,
but Fritz was firm. It was sent to
Germany at Christmas.
A few weeks later a substantial check
came in acknowledgment. The sister
had indeed appreciated tbe situation.
Two English "Ails."
It is said that in the window of a
country undertaker's shop Is displayed
a full-sized coffin, whereon is placed
this notice: "Wanted An adulr assist
ant. Inquire within.' The case finds
a parallel in that of tbe picture shop,
the window of which contained - pic
ture of Cupid, to which the legi-ud
was attached: "Wanted A respecta
ble noy." London (Jlobe.
Ever notice that when your chilJr.
want you to do a thing, they have.,
way of getting word to you?
" TJ. 8. Land Office.
. Oregon City. Ore,. Jan. 23. 1B.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June S. 1S7A entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August .4, 1S92.
" PEARL COOPER,
of Portland. County of Multnomah. State
of Oregon, has this day filed in this office
his sworn statement. No. 5616. for the
purchase of the neH of Section No. 6. in
Township No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to show that the land
sought is more valuable for its timber or
stone than for agricultural purposes, and
to establish his claim to said land before
the Register and Receiver of this office at
Oregon City. Oregon, on Tuesday, the
8th day of April. 1902.
He names as witnesses: O. T. Ireland,
of Portland: Minnie Ireland, of Portland:
C. E. Ireland, of Independence; Essie
Robertson, of Independence.
Any and all .persons claiming adverselv
the above-described lands are requested
to file their claims in this off re on or be
fore said Sth day of April. 1903.
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
" U. S. Land Office. .
Oregon City, Ore.. Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given . that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3. 1S7S, entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California. Oregon, Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August 4, 1S92. .
O. DELL IRELAND,
of Portland. County of Multnomah. State
of Oregon, has this day filed in this office
his sworn statement. No. 6615. for the
purchase of the se of Section No. 18. in
Township No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to show that the land
sought is more valuable for its timber or
stone than for agricultural purposes, and
to establish his claim to said land before
the Register and Receiver of this office at
Oregon City. Oregon, on Tuesday, the
8th day of April, 1902. . .
He names as witnesses: Minnie Ire
land, of Portland. Ore.; Willard Ireland,
of Monmouth. Ore.: C. E. Ireland, of In
dependence. Ore.; Pearl Cooper, of Port
land, Ore. -
Any and all persons claiming adverselv
the above-described lands are requested
to file their claims in this office on or be
fore said Sth day of Anrll. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES, Register.
U. S. Iand Office.
Oregon City, Ore., Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given that in com
nuance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3. 1S78. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
'he States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
N all the Public Land -States by act of
August 4. 192.
MINNIE IRELAND.
-f Portland. County of Multnomah. State
of Oregon, has this day filed in this offlcr
his sworn statement. No. 5614. for the
Purchase of the neV of Section No. 18. ir
Township No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west
and will offer proof to show that the lam"
sought is more valuable for its timber o
'tone than for agricultural purposes. and
to establish his claim to said land before
the Register and Receiver of this office a
Oregon City. Oregon, on Tuesday, the
8th day of April. 1902.
He names as witnesses: O. Dell Ire
'and. of Portland: Pearl Cooper, of Port
'and: Willard Ireland, of Monmouth; C
3. Ireland, of Independence.
Any and all persons claiming adverseK
'he above-described lands are requested
'o file their claims in this office on or be
fore said sth dav of Anril. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
TJ. S. Land Office.
Oregon City, Ore., Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given that in eon
nliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3, 187S. entitled "A
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the State" of California. Oregon, Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extender"
to all the P'iblic Land States by act of
August 4, 192.
GEORGE E. BRET,
of Independence. County of Polk. State
of Oregon, has this day filed in this office
his sworn statement. No. R613. for th
purchase of the neV of Section No. 34. in
Township No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to showvthat the lanr
sought is more valuable for Tbs.timber or
stone than for agricultural nurnoes. anr"
to establish his claim to said land before
the Register and Receiver of this office at
Oregon City. Oreeron, on Tuesday, the
8th day of April. 1902.
He names as witnesses: C. E. Ireland
of Independence. Ore.; R. Dickinson, of
Independence. Ore.; Lind'ey Brown. of
Cottage. Grove. Ore.; J. E. Hubbard, of
Independence Ore.
Anv and all persons claiming adversely
the above-described i lands are requested
to file their claims in this office on or be
fore said Sth dav of Anril. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
U. S. Land Office.
Oregon City, Ore., Jan. 23. 1912.
Notice is hereby given that in com
nllanee with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3. 187S. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands 1"
the States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extender1
to all the Public Land States by .act of
August 4, 192.
LTNDLET BROWN,
of Cottage Grove. Countv of Lane. State
of Oregon, has this day filed In this office
his sworn statement. No. 5612. for the
purchase of the nwM of Section No. 8. in
Townshln No. 13 south. Range No. 7 wt
and will offer, proof to show that
he land soueht is -more valuable for its
timber or stone than for agricultural
nurooses. and to establish his claim to
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon Citv. Ore.,
on Tuesdav. the Sth day of Anril. 1912.
He names as witnesses; C. E. Tre'and
of Independence. Ore.; J. M. McCaleh, of
independence. Ore.: L. C. Gilmore. of In
dependence. Ore.; O. A. Kramer, of Inde
pendence. Ore.
Any and all persons claiming adversely
the above-described lands a'e requester!
o file their claims in this office on or be
fore said sth dav of April. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES, Register.
TJ. S. Land Office.
Oregon City. Ore.. Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3, 1S78. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
to all the P'iblic Land States by act of
August 4, 1892.
J. M. McCALEB.
of Independence. Countv of Polk. State
of Oregon, has this day filed in this office
his sworn statement. No. 5611. for the
purchase of the neU of Section No. 8. in
Townshln No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and w'U ofer proof to show that
the land soueht is more valuable for its
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish his claim to
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City, iv-e.,
on Tuesdav. the Sth dav of Anril. W..
He names as witnesses: O. L. Brown,
of Independence. Ore.: .T. E. Hubbard, of
Tpdenendence. Ore.: C. E. Ireland, of In
dependence. Ore.; O. A. Kramer, of In
dependence, Ore.
Anv and all persons claiming adverselv
the above-described lands are requested
to file their claims in this office on or be
fore said sb dav of Aim 19".
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
U. S. Land Office,
Independence, Polk County, Ore..
Jan. 23 1902
Notice Is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3, 178. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August 4. 192.
CORRIE C. HUBBARD,
of Independence. County of Polk. State
of Oregon, has this day filed In this office
his sworn statement. No. 5610. for the
purchase of the sw of Section No. 8. in
Township No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to show that
the land sought is more valuable for its
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish h!s claim to !
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon Citv. o-e..
on Tuesday, the Sth day of April. 1902. i
He names as witnesses: C E. Ireland,
of Independence. Ore.; Willard Ireland,
of Independence. Ore: J. E. Hubbard, of
Independence. Ore.; Geo. E. Brey, of In
dependence. Ore.
Anv and all persons claiming adversely
the above-described lands are requeued
to file their claims in this office on or be
fore said Sth day of Anril. 1902. i
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
U. S. Land Office.
Oregon Citv. Ore.. Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3. IT, entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California, Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
o an the mic Land states by act or
August 4. 1892.
JOSEPH E. HUBBARD,
of Independence. County of Polk. State
of Oregon, has this day fl'ed n this office
his sworn statement. No. 5609. for the
purchase of the se of Section No. 8. in
Townshln No. 13 south, range No. 7 west, i
and ' will offer proof to show that
the land sought is more valuable for its
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish his claim to
said land -before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City. Ore..
on Tuesday, the Sth day of April. 1912.
He names as witnesses: C. E. Ireland,
of Independence. Ore.; Willard. Ireland,
of Independence. Ore.; J. M. McCaleb. of
Independence. Ore.; Essie Robertson, of
Independence, Ore.
Any and all persons claiming adverselv
the above-described lands are requested
to file their claims in this office on or be
fore said Rth day of April. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES, Register.
TJ. S. Land Office,
Oregon City. Ore.. Jan. 23. 1912.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3. 1S7S. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory," as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August 4. 1S92.
HARRY DE BORD.
of Portland. County of Multnomah. State
of Oregon.. has this day filed in this office
his sworn statement. No. SffiS. for the
purchase of the sw14 of Section No. 4. in
Township No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to show that
the land sought is more valuable for its
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish his claim to
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City. n-e..
on Tuesday, the 8th day of April. 1902.
He names as witnesses: Pearle Hedges
of Independence. Ore.: Chas. Bilveu. of
Independence. Ore.; Geo. Jones, of Inde
pendence, Ore. ; Ernest Irvine, of Inde
pendence, Ore.
Any and all persons claiming jritrcr
Mie above-described lands are requested
to file their claims In th;s otf-" on or w
fore said Sth day of Anril. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
TJ. S. Land Office.
Oregon City, Ore.. Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of Juno 3. 1S7S, entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
o all the Public Land States by act of
August 4. 192.
CLARENCE E. IRELAND.
-f Independence. County of Polk, State
of Oregon, has this day fl'ed ' rh!-
his sworn statement. No. 5607, for the
purchase of the swy of Section No
Townshln No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to show ' that
he land sought is more valuable for Its
timber or stone than for agricultural
-"lrnoses. and to establish his claim to
said land before the Register and Re
reiver of this office at Oregon Citv, Ore..
-n Monday, the 7th day of April, 1902.
He names as witnesses: Charles Bil
veu, Samuel Irvin. Willard W. Ireland
T-n"1s C. Gilmore. all of Independence.
Polk County. Oregon.
Any and all persons claiming adverselv
the above-described lands are reoueted
-. fli tv.et claims in this office on or be
fore said 7th day of Anril. W.
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register
TJ. S. Land Office,
Oregon City, Ore., Jan. 23. 1912.
Notice is hereby given that in com--ance
with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3. 17-" entire " -'"r
the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California On-mi
md Washington Territory.' as extended
- all the Public Land States by act of
August 4, 1?92.
LOUIS C. GILMORE.
of Independence. Countv of Po'k. Sfste
Oregon, has this day filed in this office
his sworn statement. No. 5606. for the
rchae of the nw of Section No. 26. in
rownsnip wo. 13 south. Range No. 7 west
and will offer proof to show that
fbe land sought is more valuable for its
timber or. stone than for agricultural
nurposes. and to establlsb his c1s't to
-aid land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon Citv. o-e.
on Monday, the 7th day of April. 1902.
He names as witnesses: Clarence Ire
'and. of Independence. Ore.; Pearl
Tedges, of Independence. Ore.; C"has.
Rilveu, of Independence,, Ore.; Erne3t
Erwin. of Independence. 'Ore.
Any and all persons claiming adverselv
the above-described lands are requested
'o file their claims In this office on or be
fore said 7th day of April. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES, Register.
U. S. Land Office,
Oregon City, Ore.. Jan. 23. 1912.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3. 1r73 ent''en -ct
for the Sale of Timber Lands in
he States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August 4. 1S92.
WILLIARD W. IRELAND.
-f Monmouth, County -of Polk, State
of Oregon, has this day filed n tn's ,..
his sworn statement.. No. 5605. for the
purchase of the se of Section No. 34. In
"ownsbin No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to show that
the land sought Is more valuable for its
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish his claim to
a1d land before the Register and Re-ceiver-of
this office at Oregon Cftv. e-e-,
on Monday, the 7th day of April. 1902.
He names as witnesses: O. L. Brown,
of Cottage Grove: Pearl Hedges, of Inde
pendence: Chas. Bilveu. of Independence;
I. E. Hubbard, of Independence.
Any and all persons claiming adversely
the above-described lands are requested
to file their claims in this office on or be
fore said 7th day of April. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
TJ. S. Land Office.
Oregon City, Ore., Jan. 23, 1302.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of tbe act of
Congress of June 3. 1S7S. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California. Oregon, Nevada
and Washington Territory," as extended
n all the P-'blic Land States by act of
August 4, l.r92.
ORVILL A. KRAMER,
pe Independence. County of Polk, State
of Oregon, has this day filed in tins uiut-e
his sworn statement. No. 5604, for the
purchase of the se1 of Section No. 4. in
Township No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to show that
the land sought is more valuable for its
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish his claim to
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City, Ore.,
on Monaay, tne 7tn aay or April. i02.
trie names as witnesses:
L. C. Gillmore.
of Independence. Ore : C. E. Ireland, of
Independence. Ore.; Geo. Brey. of Inde-
penaence, ore.; jonn ai. jvicuaieD, or in-
dependence. Ore.
Any and all persons claiming adversely
iiiij auu c-ucni,i iucu laiius flic IcqucMCU 1
to nie tneir claims m this otnee on or be
fore said 7th dav of Anril. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES, Register.
U. S. Land Office.
Oregon City, Ore., Jan. 23, 1902.
Notice is herebv eiven that m com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
congress or June 3, ltix. entitled An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands In
the States of California. Oregon, Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August 4. 1892.
ESSIE G. ROBERTSON,
ft TndononrlorKio Pnnntv r ' I -v V C? - .
of Oregon, has this day filed in this office banquets, drove out in their chariots,
JulcnSrof'VZ-Nrta "d pleasure excursions on the
Township No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west, Nile. At banquets the guests were en-
fhla'sou fsore taluaofe'fors ?ertaifd ?hlef WiU mUSiC 8nd
timber or stone than for agricultural Ing. Singing was also an esteemed ac-
?aidPTand before Register andVe- - complement, and the more solid part
ceiver of this office at Oregon City, ore., of their education must have been at
on Monday, the 7th day of April. 1902. tended to, as women often held Import
He names as witnesses: C. E. Ireland. '
of independence: L. c. Gilmore. of inde- ant offices in the priesthood. They pre-
pendence; J. E. Hubbard, of Inde- -idpfl flt hirth and hnrinls
pendence; Willard Ireland, of Monmouth. " 1ea al Dlrzaa ana DuriaiS.
Any and all persons claiming adverselv Ladies of rank occupied their Spare
the above-described lands are requested mnments In vmhrnlrlprv nnrl In th cnl-
to file their claims In this office on or be- oments m emDroiaery ana in ine cut
fore said 7th day of Anril. 1902. tlvation of flowers, of which they were
chas. B. moores. Register, passionately fond, and which were lav-
u. s. Land Office, lshly nsed on all festive occasions.
Oregon City. Ore., Jan. 23. 1902. Women of the humbler classes were
Notice is hereby given that in com- , , . ' . . ,.
piiance with the provisions of the act of employed in spinning and In the rural
Congress of June 3, 1873. entitled "An districts In tending cattle and sheep.
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands In . , , . ,
the states of California. Oregon, Nevada and in carrying water the heavier em-
and Washington Territory." as extended ployments being left to the men.
to all the Public Land States by act of " . . , . . . . . .
August 4, 1892. i This halcyon state of affairs lasted
PEARii L. HEDGES, only during the days of Egypt's great-
of Indenendence. County oi i-olk. State flnrin tho nerinrl nf her declin
of Oregon, has this day filed in this office ness "tiring tne period oi ner aeenne
his sworn statement. No. 5602. for the her daughters were fearfully down-
Luhsawy4off se4 oefSe&onneNo. . ?n trodden and degraded. The hardest
Townshln No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west, manual labor was assigned to them.
thed land 'sought hTmore valuab?e or'ns
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish his claim to
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City, Ore.,
on Mondav. the 7th day of Anril. 1902.
He names as witnesses: L. C. Gilmore.
of Indenendence; C. E. Ireland, of Inde
pendence; Ernest Irvine, of Inde
pendence; O. A. Kramer, of Independ
ence. Any and all persons claiming adverselv
the above-described lands are requested
to file their claims in this office on or be
fore said 7th day of April. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES, Register.
TJ. S. Land Office,
Oregon City, Ore.. Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice Is hereby ziven that In com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June S, 1S7S. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California. Oregon, Nevada
and Washington Territory," as extended
10 an me fuDuc mna states by act or
August 4. 1S92.
GEORGE JONES.
of Independence. County of Polk. State
of Oregon, has this day filed In this office
his sworn statement. No. 5601. for the
purcnase or the nwH or section No. 34. In -Township
No. 13 south. Ranee No. 7 west.
and will offer proof to show that
the land sought is more valuable for its
timber or stone than . for agricultural
purposes, and to establish his claim to
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City, Ore.,
on Mununjr, ine itn aay 01 April, laua.
He names as witnesses: Chas. Bilveu.
of Independence; Pearl Hedges, of Inde
pendence; samuei is. Irvine, or inde
pendence; C. E. Ireland, of Independence.
Any and all persons claiming adversely
the above-described lands are requested
to-file their claims in this office on or be--fore
said 7th day of April, 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
TJ. S. Land Office.
Oregon City. Ore., Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given that in com.
Congress of June 3. lc7. etitit'ed "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands In
the States of California. Oregon. iNevana
and Washington Territory." as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August 4, 1592, , . .
JAMES Q. SMITH. . -
of Independence. County of Polk.. State
of Oregon, has this day filed in this office
his sworn statement. No. 5600. for the
purchase of the nH of ne4 and sw4
of neH of Section No. 4. In Town
ship No. 13 south. Range No.
7 west, and will offer proof to show
that the land sought Is more valuable for
Its timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish his claim to
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City. Ore.,
vii ULVliuay, lilts '111 Ulty UL April, 19U3.
He names as witnesses: Chas. Bilyeu,
of Independence; Samuel E. Irvine, of
Independence; Rupert Dickinson, of In
dependence; C. E. Ireland, of Independ
ence. Any and all persons claiming adversely
the above-described lands are requested
to file their claims in this offlr-e on or be
fore said 7th day of April. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
TJ. S. Land Office,
Oregon City. Ore.. Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3, 1F7. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in,
the States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August 4. 192.
SAMUEL E. IRVINE,
of Independence. Countv of Polk. State
of Oregon, has this day filed in this office
his sworn statement. No. 5599. for the
purchase of the seM of Section No. 26. in
Townshln No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to show that
'and soiisht is more valuable for its
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish his clnlm to
said . land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City, Ore.,
on Monday, the 7th day of April. 1902.
He names as witnesses: Geo. Jones, of
Independence: Rupert Dickinson, of In
dependence; Pearl Hedges, of Independ
ence: Chas. Bilveu. of Independence.
Any and all (persons claiming adversely
the above-described lands are requested
to file their clafcns in this office on or be
fore said 7th dav of April. 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES. Register.
TJ. S. Land Office,
Oregon City, Ore., Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3, 1878. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands in
the States of California. Oregon. Nevada
and Washington Territory." as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August 4, 1?92.
CHAS. BILyEU.
of Independence. County of Polk. State
of Oregon, has this day filed In this office
his sworn statement. No. 539S. for the
purchase of the ne6 of Section No. 26. In
Township No. 13 south. Range No. 7 west,
and will offer proof to show that
the land sought Is more valuable for its
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish bis claim to
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City, Ore.,
on Monday, the 7th day of Anril. 1902.
He names as witnesses: Willard Ire
land, of Monmouth. Ore- n vt T
of Independence, Ore.; George Jones, of
Independence Ore.; Pearl Irieuges, oi In
dependence. Ore.
Any and all persons claiming adversely
the above-described lands are requested
to file their claims in '- on or be
fore said 7th day of April, 1902.
CHAS. B. Moulds, register.
TJ. S. Land Office,
Oregon City, Ore., Jan. 23. 1902.
Notice is hereby given that in com
pliance with the provisions of the act of
Congress of June 3. 1S7S. entitled "An
Act for the Sale of Timber Lands In
the States of California. Oregon, Nevada
and Washington Territorv." as extended
to all the Public Land States by act of
August 4, lc92.
RUPERT DICKINSON,
of Independence. County of Polk. State
of Oregon, has this day filed in this office
his sworn statement. No. 5597. for the
purchase of the swH of Section No. 34. in
Township No. 13 south, Range No. 7 west,
apd w-'ll offer proof to show that
the land sought is more valun' v ,
timber or stone than for agricultural
purposes, and to establish h ciii in io
said land before the Register and Re
ceiver of this office at Oregon City. Ore.,
on Monday, the 7th day of April. '1902.
He names as witnesses: Geo. Brey,
of Independence: c. E. Ireland, of Inde
pendence: Chas. Bilyeu. of Independence;
Pearl Hedges, of Independence.
Any and all persons claiming adversely
the above-described lands are requested
to file their claims in this office on or be
fore said 7th day of April, 1902.
CHAS. B. MOORES, Register.
WOMEN IN OLD EGYPT.
They Shared with the Men All Thelt
Pastimes and Pleasures.
In ancient EzvDt monosramv was
I . . .
practicea, aitnougu n was not enjoinea
by law. There is no evidence 6f the
i , . ...
existence of a marriage ceremony, but
' the marriage contract secured to the
wife certain rights, one of which was
that of complete control over her hus
band, who promised to yield her im
plicit obedience! Nearness of relation
ship was no barrier to wedlock, the
union of brother and sister being quite
common.
Women, both married and unmarried,
participated with men In all the pleas
ures of social Intercourse. They took
part In the public festivals, shared its
"d they suffered cruel punishments
for the crimes of their fathers, hus
bands or brothers, as the case might
be. Sometimes they were publicly
beaten with sticks, at others thrown
into dungeons or sent to work iu the
nines, where the miseries they endured
were so great that, as the old historian
tells ns. they longed for death as far
preferable to life. The Westminster
Beview. ,