Liberal Republican. (Dallas, Or.) 1872-1???, December 14, 1872, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    r
v
VOL. 3, NO. 39.
DALLAS, OREGON. SATURDAY. DEO. 14. 1872.
WHOLE NO. 144.
T IfTRTPR A I PPPHTIRT W A TV
JJj II JED JDJ ITO, i iu M,LjL UJDJljiiUllxlo
j
She Scrat 3JjuHi tatt
Is Issued Every Saturday Morning, it
Dallas, Folk County, Oregon.
ff. C. SULLIVAN PROPRIETOR,
SUBSCRIPTION BATES.
SINGLE COPIES One Year, $2 00. Six
Months, $1 25 Ibreo Months, $100
For Clubs of tea or more $1 75 per annum.
Subscription must be paid atricHy in advance
ADVERTISING RATES.
Gne square (10 lines or los.oV rstisertn, $3 00
Each subsequent insertion'. 1 00
A liberal deduction will be made to quar
terly and yearly advertisers.
Professional cards will bo inserted at $12 00
-per annum.
Transient advertisements must be paid for
in advance to insure publication. All other
ad reriising bills must be paid quarterly.
TiOgal tenders taken at their current value.
Blanks and Job Work of every description
-urnished at low rates on short notice.
THE ILLUSTRATED PHRENOLOGICAL
JOURNAL, is in every respect a Firt-
Class Magazine. Its articles are of the highest
interest to all. It teaches what we are and how
to make the most of ar?ci e.f . The informa
tion it contains on the Laws of Life and Health
-is well worth the price of the Magazine to every
Family. It is published at $3 00 a year, liy
a special arrangement wo are enabled to offee
the Phrenological Journal as a Premium tor
a new lubscribers to the Orrron Republican,
or will furnish the Phrenological Journal
and -Orkco.n Republican together for $1 00
We commend the Journal to all who want a
J2XTRACT3 PROM TIIK PKHSI-
MEXICO
Since your last session the President
af the Mexican Republic, distinguish
jed by his high character and by hi J
services to his country, has died
His temporary successor has now been
elected with prcat unanimity by the
people, a proof of confidence; on their
jart in his patriotism, which it is
believed will be confirmed by the re
sults of his administration- It i.-
-paticularly desirable that nothing
should be left undone by the Govern
ments of the two republics to strength
en their relations as neighbors and
friends. It is much to be regretted
that many lawless acts coutinue to
disturb the quiet of the settlements on
.the border between our territory
and that of Mexico, and that complaints
jof jrroog to American citizens in vari
ous parts of the country are made.
The revolutionary conduct in which the
neighboring Republic has so long been
involved has in some degree contribu
ted to tbis disturbance. It is to be
hoped that a more settled rule of order
through that Republic, which be
.expected for the present government,
and that the acta of which just com
plaint has been made will cease.
The proceedings of the Commission
under the convention with Mexico on
the 4th of Jnly,1808, on the subject of
claims, have unfortunately been check
ed by an obstacle, for the removal of
which measuies have been taken by
the two Governments,' which it is be
lieved will prove successful.
The Commissioners, appointed pur
suant to a joint resolution of Congress,
of 7th of May last, to inquire into the
depredations on the Texican frontier,
have diligently made investigations on
that subject. Their report upon the
subject will be communicated to
you. Their researches wyre necessari
ly incomplete, parthdy on account of
the limited appropriation made by
Congrcf-s. Mc?ico, on the part of
that Government, appointed a similar
commission to investigate these out.
rages. It is not announced officially,
but tho press ofthat country states that
he fullest investigation is d r d ; n I
tout the co-operation of all parties
corncerncd is invited to secure that
end. T, therefore, recommend that a
special appropriation be made at
the earliest day practicable, to enable
the Commissioner on the part of the
United States to return to their labors
without delay.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
The Secretary of the Interior re
ports as satisfactory the improvement
and progression in each of the soyeral
bureaus under the control of the Inte
rior Department. They are all
in excellent condition. All the current,
business has been promptly dispatch
ed. The policy which was adopted at
the beginning of this administration
with regard to the management of the
Indians has been as successful
as its most ardent friends anticipated
within so short a time. It has reduced
the expenses of their management
decreased their forays ubon the white
settlements tending to give the largest
opportuity for the extension of the
great railways through tho public
domain and the pushing of settlements
into many districts of couutry, aud at
the same time to improve the .condition
of the Indians. This policy will bej
maintained without changa exepting
such as farther experience may
show to bo. necessary to render it more
efficient. The Subject of converting
the so-called Indian Territory south of
Kansas into a home, for the Indians
and erecting thereon a territorial form
of Government, is one of very great
importance as a complement to the
existing Indian policy. The question
of their removal to the territory has
within the past year been presented to
many tribes resident upon other and
less desirable portions of the pnpblie
domain, and has generally been recicved
by them with favor. As other prelimi
nary step to the organisation of such a
territory, it will be neccesary to confine
the Indians now resident thereon to
farms of proper size, which should
be secured to them in Tee, residue to be
ued for the settlement of other friend
ly Indians. Efforts will be made in
the immediate future to induce
the removal of as many of the peacea
bly disposed Indians ci:!" t-i i Icdiri
Territory as can be settled properly
without disturbing the harmony
of those already there. A proper loca
tion, now available, where a people who
are endeavering to acquire a knowl
edge of pastral and agricultural pur
suits can be as well accommodated as
upon the uuoeupied lauds of
tho Indian Tetritory. A Territorial
Government should, however, protect
the Indians from inroads of tho whites
for a term of years, until they became
sufficiently advanced in the arts of
civilization to guard their own rights
For the same period, during the last
fiscal year, there was dnpo.-ed of out
the public lands. 1 l,bO 1,975 acres a
quantity greater by 1,009,270 acres
than was disposed of the previous year.
Of this amount, 1,370,320 acres were
sold for cah ; 380,100 acres located
vith military warrants; t. 07 1. 332 acres
taken for homesteads ; 00.'J,013 acres
located with college scrip ; 3,55 1,887
acres granted to railroads; 450,317
acres granted to wagon road ; 711,255
acres givn to States as swamp land.
and 5,700 acres located bv Indian scrip
The cash receipts from all sources in
the Land Oifico amounted $3,208,100
during tho same period; 22,010,008
acres of public lands were surveyed,
which,added to the quantity before
surveyed amounts to 53,303,780
acres, leaving 1,258,033,028 acres of
puplic lands still unsurveyed. He-
ports from the suborbiuatcs of the
Land Office contain interesting
information in regard to their respect
ive districts, lney uniformity men
tion tho fruitfulness of the yield during
the past season, and the increased yield
of all kinds of produce evince that in
those States and Territories where
mining is the principal business
the agricultural products havj exceed
ed the local demand, and liberal ship
ments have been made to distant
points.
THE C.ENEVA ARBITRATION.
When Congress adjourned in June a
question had been raised by Great
Britain, and was then pending, which
for a timo seriously imperiled the
settlement bv friendly arbitration of
the differences existing between the
Government and that of Her Britannic
Majesty. The Treaty of Washington
Iml been referred to tho Tribunal of
Arbitration which met at Geneva,
in Switzerland. The arbitrators, how
ever, disposed of tho question which
had jeopardized the whole of the
treaty, ant threatened to involve the
two nations in unhappy relations
toward each other, in a manner entirely
satisfactory to this Government, and in
accordance with tho views and policy
which it has maintained. The Tiibu
ual, which convened in December,
concluded its laborious session on the
1 Ifh of September last ; on that date
having availed itself of tho discretiona
ry power given to it by tho Treaty to
award a sum in gross, it made its
decision, whereby it awarded tho sum
of 815,00,000 in gold as an indem
nity to bo paid by Great Britam to the
United States for satisfaction of all
claims referred to its consideration.
This decision, happily, disposed of a
long standing difference between tho
two Governments, an.?, in connection
with ano her award made by the Ger
man Emperor under reference to him
by the same Treaty, leaves the two
Governments without a shadow on
their friendly relations, which it is my
sincere hope may forever remain equal
ly unclouded. The report of the agent
of the United States appointed to attend
the Geneva Tribunal, accompanied by
protocols of the proceedings of the ar
bitrators, arguments of counsel of both
Governments, award of the Tribunal
and tho opinions given by the several
arbitrators, is transmitted herewith.
I have caused to be communicated to
the heads of the three friendly powers,
who complied with tho joint request
made to thcra under the Treaty, the
thanks of tho Government for the ap
pointment of arbitrators made by them
respecting it, and also my thanks to the
eminent personages named by them,
and my appreciation of the dignity,
patience, impartiality, and great ability
with which they discharged their ardu
ous and high functions. Her Majes
ty's Government has communicated to
me its appreciation by Her Majesty of
the ability and indefatigablo industry
displayed by Mr. Adams, the arbitra
tor named by this Government, during
the protracted inquiries and discussions
cf the Tribuual. I cordially unite
with. Her Majesty iu this appreciation.
it is due to the agent of the 1
",ru
Mate bctore the l.,,,,,! t,i rf-eoid
my appreciation of the marked ability,
unwearied patience, and tho prudence
ana .discretion with which fie has
couducted the very responsible and
delicate duties entrusted to him, as it is
also due to the learned and eminent
counsel who attended the Tribunal on
the part of this Govt rnmeut, to express
my sense of the talent and wisdom
which they brought to bear in the ar
gument, and upon the result so happily
reached. It will be tho proviuee of
Congress to provide for the distribution
among those who may be entitled to it,
of their respective shares of the money
to be paid. Although it it not paya
ble until a year from the date of the
award, it is deemed advisable that no
lime be Iot in making the proper
examination of the several eases in
which indemnification may be dun.
I consequently recommend the creation
of a Board of Commissioners for that
purpose.
THE SAN JUAN QUESTION.
Bv the thirtv-fourth article of the
Treaty of Washington, the respective
claiirs of the united States and of
Great Britain in their costructioa of
the Treaty of tho 15th June, 1817,
defining their boundary line between
th-jir respective territories, were sub
mitted ; to the arbitration of His
Majesty, the Emperor of Ger
many, to decide which of tho claims
was most in accordance with tho true
interpretation of the Treaty of 1810.
His Majesty having been pleased to
undertake the arbitration, has the
earnest thanks of this Government and
tie people of the United States for the
labor, pains and care whico he has
devoted to tho consideration of this
long pending difference. I have
caused an expression of my thanks to
bo transmitted to His Majesty. Mr.
Bancroft the representative of this
Government at Berlin, conducted the
case and 'prepared the statement on the
part of the united States with the
ability thai his past services justified
the public in expecting at his hands.
As a member of tho Cabinet at the date
of the treaty which has given rise to
the discussion between the Govern
ments, as the Minister to Great Britain,
when tho obstruction now pronounced
unfounded was first advanced, and as
the agent and representative of tho
Government to present the case and to
receive the award, lie has been assoeia
ted with the question in all its phases,
and in every stage has manifested a
patriotic zeal and earnestness in tho
maintenance of the claim of the United
States. He is entitled to much credit
for tho success which has attended
the commission, after a patient
investigation of tho caso and
of the statement of each party. His
Majesty the Fmperor of Germany, on
the 21st day of October last, figned his
award in writing decreeing that tho
claim of the Government of the United
States that tho boundary line between
tho territories of Her Britannio Majes
ty and tho United States could bo
drawn through the Dellaro channel is
is most in accordance with tho true
interpretation of the. treaty concluded
on the 5th of June, 1818, between the
agents of Her Britannio Majosty and
the United States. Copies of this caso
presented in behalf of tin Government,
and tho statement in reply to each, and
a translation of tho award, aro trans
mitted herewith. This award confirms
the United States in their claim to the
important archipelago of islands lying
between the continent and Vancouver
island, which for twenty-six years
ever tuuco me ratmcation or the treaty
Great Britain has held and leaves us,
for the first time in the history of the
United States as a nation, without a
question of disputed boundary between
our territory and possessions of Great
Britain on this continent. It is my
gratification to acknowledge the
prompt and spontaneous action of Her
Majesty's Government in giving eflect
to the award in anticipation of auy
reouest from this Government, and
bel tore the reception of the award,signed
by the Emperor, Her Majesty had
given instructions for the removal of
her troops stationed there, and for the
cessation of all exercise or claim of
jurisdiction, so as to leave the United
States in exclusive possession of the
lately disputed territory. I am grati-;
tied to be able to announce that tho
orders for tho removal of the troops
have been executed, and military joint (
occupation of San Juan has ceased.
The Island are now in exclusive pos
session of the United States. It now
becomes necessary to complete the
survey and determination of that nor-
Ul . uuiiary line through
Dellaro channel, upon which tho
commission which determined the
remaining part of the line were unable to
agree I recommend the apointment of
a commission to act jointly with one
which maybe naml by Her Majesty
for that purpose, lhe experience of
the difficulties attending the deter
mination of our admitted line of boun
dary after the occupation of territory
and it settlement by those owing
allegiance to the respective Govern
ments, points to the importance of
establishing, by natural objects or other
measurement, the actual lino between
the territory acquired by purchase from
Russia aud the adjoining possessions of
Her 1 ntanmc Maj sty. The rcgiou is
now so sparcely occupied that no
conflicting interests of individuals or
of jurisdiction arc likely to interfere to
the delay or cmbarassmcnt of the
actual location of the line. If deferred
until population shall enter and occupy
the territory, some trivial contests of
nighbors may again array the two
Governments in antagonism ; I there
fore recommend the appointment of a
commission, to act jointly with one that
uiav o appointed on the part cf Great
Britain, to determine the line between
our territory of Alaska and the
adjoining possession of Great Britain
THE TREAHXJ RY DEPAUTMENT.
The money received and carried
into tho Treasury during the fiscal
yoar ending January 30, 1872, were ;
From customs, 021,037.028 0 7; from
sales of publio lands, 82,575,514 19;
from internal revenue, 3130,042,177
37 : from tax on national banks, etc.,
0,523,300 39; from the Pacific Rail
road Companies, 8749,801 87 ; from
customs, lines etc, $51,130,442 34;
from fees of Consuls, patents, lands,
etc., 82,284,005 92 ; from miscellane
ous sources, 84,412,551 71 ; total of
ordinary receipts, 8304,004,229 91 ;
from premium on sales of coin.89,412,
037 l5 ; total net receipts, 8374,010,
837 50 ; balance in Treasury June 30,
1871, 810,935,705 79 ; including 31,
822 835 ; received from unavailable
assets total available cash, 8484,042,
573 15. Tho net expenditures by
warrants drawn during tho same pe
riod were: For civil expenses, 310,
189,079 70 ; for foreign iutercst, 818.
409,30914; Indians, 87,005,720 88;
pensions, 328,533,402 70; military es
tablishment, including fortifications,
river and harbor improvements and
arsenals, 331,537,215 72; for naval
establishments, including vessels and
machinery and improvements at the
Navy-yards, 821,249,809 09 ; For mis
cellaneous civil cnpenditures, including
total, exclusive of principal and pretni
urn on public debt, 8270,559,G95 91; for
premium on bonds purchased, $4,958,
700 Gn for redemption of tho public debt
99,915 310; total, 8100,918,520 30;
total nctdisbursements,S377,478,2lG 21
balance in treasury, Juno 30, 1872,
108 501,350,94 Total, $484,042,
503 15. From tho foregoing statement
it ' appears that the net reduction of
of the principle of the debt, during the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1872, was
$99,900,253 54. Tho source of re
duction is as follows: Net ordinary
receipt? during tho year. $3(34,094,
229 91 ; net ordinary expenditures,
r.r. ni'.nm . .i:r ttO.t 1Q1
9iHV)iF,uiwtri , uiuuiuuuu, wi-x,tj-K,.
535, add tho amount of receipts from t
public buildings, light-houses and col
lecting tho revenue, 12,958,329 08 ;in
tcrost on public debt, S118.:58..839 72 ;
PROFESSIONAL CARDS, kC
JTOIli! J. DALY,
AU'y & C;iascllcr-at-liaw.
DALLAS, OREGON.
Will practice in the Court of Record and In
eiior Court:. Collections attended to promptly.
OFFICE la the Court Uoum.
41-tf
P. C. SU&MVAN,
Attorney & Couusellor-At-Lar,
Dalles, Oregon,
Will practice ia all the Courta of the State. 1
B. E riSKB.
C.B.K1XL.
DRS. PISKG & HALL,
OFFICE No 1 MOORES' BLOCK,
Salem... Oregon
J. C. GRUSBS, M. D.,
PIIVSICIAN AN :L"(;EoS,
Offers Vis Services to tbe Citizens Dallas
and Vieinitj.
OFFICE t NICHOLS Drug Store.
34-tt
J.It.SITES,M.D
Pbjgician and Surgeon Dallas Oregon
or FIVE
at Ilei4eiioe
24-tf
DR. HUDSON L M.
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
OFFICE. O rer Souther! Store,
Cor. of Commercial k StaU Sti., Salem, Ogn,
with Dr. Richardson.
Nor 9, tf
W, H R U B E L L,
DENTIST
Has located to Dallas, and is ready te
attend to all those requiring bis assistance.
Artificial Teeth of the very finest and best
kind.
Satisfaction guaranteed, or no charges made.
Now is tbe time to ed! on the Doctor.
Office, opposite Kincaid's Photographic Qal
ery. S 37-tl
J- C. BELT,
physician n. n d
Surgoo n,
OFFERS HIS PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
to the citirens of Dallas and Ticinity. Har
hd ten years experience in hospital and pri
vate practice, foals competent to treat all caces
that may come under his care. Office adjoin
ing Dr, Rubell's denistry office.
Ij CREOLE ACADEMY
Will commence tbe second teVm Monday
Nor. 11, 1S72, with a full corps of teachers as
follows :
F- n. GRUBBS, Frixcifal, Mrs. L. A.
GRUBBS, pKECKfTRKSA, Miss. M. E. SMITH
Teachrr or mi'sic.
Rates of tuition as foiiows ;
Acadrmic Dep't 00
EfiGLisif Braxcuks $6 00
Prima rt Dkp't $4 00
Extra Studies
Frkkck Pik Term Um. 2 50
Drawixo , 2 60
Music ; .. -......$12 00
MM T
OF WORK AT THE LOWEST
LIVING PRICES, CAN HE HAD
Ur CALLING ON.
fllMES So RACIIEsLDER
; STEAM JOB PRINTERS,
03 1'rout Street, Portland, Oregon
A LARGE ASSORTMENT of BLANKS
Circuit. County, and Justices' Courts, con
stantly on hand. Also, Bonds, Deeds, Mortgages
and Blanks for use in Bankruptcy cases.
Advertise
ity using ljouernraui, ouiuor 11 nrl circu
Utit priuto.i envelopes, uio. Give us ;aall fo:
sou i in your orders. i;2l
0
IEW GROCERY.
For! everything in the GROCERY LINB
HI. C BROWN'S,
MAIN STRECT, -DALLAS.
lie has on hand a full supply, which he
offers cheaper than any other Store in Dallas.
2-tf
DALLA8 LIVERY. FEED & GALE
STABLEST
Cor. M&Iji and Court Streets,
Thos. G. Richmond, Proprietor.
HAVING PURCHASED THE ABOVE
Stand of Mr. A. II. Whitley, we hare re
fitted and re-ptocked it in sech a asaaner as
will satisfactorily meet every want t tfte com
munity. Ilugglts, tingle or double, Hack, Con
cord Wagons, etc., etc.,
Furnished at all hours, day or sight, ea
short notice.
Superior Saddle Horses, let t
Dav
C'Ka
TERMS, REASONAnLC
4 T. O. RICHMOND
FARMERS READ.
r ANTED, ALL THE PORK IW
?T 1
Polk County, for whi
1c highest cash
price will be paid
AT TIIE
EOLA STORE.
RAVING PURCHASED A LARGE AND
complete Stock of NEW GOODS, ant
receiTing fresh supplies every week I can fsp
ply everybody with
Dry Goods,
Groceries
Glass, lticensware
Tobacco, Cigars
And all articles found in a GENERAL VAR1
KTY bTORE, I would respectfully eall the
attention 0 the Public to my Establishment.
Highest Cash price paid for J
I'UKS AND PELTRY.
R. A. RAT,
Eola, Polk Co., Ogn
18-tf
CHEAP PAJNTilYG
I S I AM NOW THROUGH WITI! THE
Amost f m7 work this fatl, I propose to
paint HACKS, tt'AGOSS, and BUG.
GIBS at $10,50 apiece. Now is the time to
bring on your old Hacks and Wagons as yo
will nerer get them painted cheaper.
Shop on tho corner, over G. B. Styles store
11, r, SI1RIVER.
"GEM" SALOON
JIAIiV STREET INDE
PENDENCE. Tbe best of wines, riqnors, ales, porters anl
TEMPERANCE CORDIALS always on
hand, flue Havana cigars, tree reading rooms
attached to the saloon. R. M. Bean Pr.
27 tf
LOOK! LOOK!!
LOOK!!
BOX. T 13 R WOBTIEY eb CO
ELLENDALE STORE,
Have jest received an immense stot
Doots and Shoes,
Hats and Caps,
Clothing, Crockery aud Glassware
Hardware, CJrocerles, Pro vislous, Ac.
DltHSS GOODS, SA AM PiE, FANCY,
Si DRY QOODS of all kinds.
Whi oh they will sell cheap, Com and
try their prices.
niThe highest -price paid forf all kinds csuntfj
produce.
MILLIONS of EGGS and TONS of BUTTER
Wanted
Boiler 8c Wortley
I :
T
MlO,.