The independent. (Hillsboro, Washington County, Or.) 188?-189?, May 31, 1888, Image 1

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    C THE INDgEHDENT.-
THE INDEPENDENT.
r
mm WEMJEl
VT. L. JONES ...... Editor and Proprietor.
H
. .. fl.M
ion, )
al settle-
PUBLISHED
EVERY THURSDAY EVENING.
PUBLICATION OFFICK:
Main Street, : : Shute's New Uriel
HILLSBORO, OREGON.
1.00 per
ftO (Mint
tUm.
I .
Xe people and by the people:1
' .
olumns
notices
"A GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE, FOR
cards, t lit twrvear.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
rr nnnura, in advance $ 2.00
Six months, in advance .' 1.00
Three months, in advance 50
iiis-cial rate for Isrca disiilav "ad.M
f-tfThia pitjK-r mny 1m found on ill at
ueo. r. iiowui x. va Newspaper Aavertis-
Vol. X
llillsboro, Wnaliiiigton County, (fegoii, Tliurmtlny, JWTny 31, 188S.
Xo. 5S.
ina Bureau (10 Spruce street) wbxr adver-
u Mpruon
tiaintc contracts mny be trmdu for it in Now
lorn .
vr
TWSSKSSBBiaSB
m it an in in- hi tt. i u j i
1 IWiF fihlfM,,nTiH)rt on: sou
I V itfrMfffiVff for each aajhfieajieut iiiifcd
v 11 vr 5niWASdaw.: ji.i mr!?Zid
, y-
OFFICIAL JilRFXTOKY.
Iltrirt Offlrrra.
Jude Fifth District F. J. Taylor
Prosecuting Attorney.. . T. A. MoBride
Deputy for Washington Co. . ..W. N. Barrett
Legislative Officer.
State Senator W. D. Hare.
ID Gubser,
Representatives D. Smith,
1 Thoa. Paulsen. .
County Oflleera).
Judge R. Crandall
Treasurer J. S. Waggener
Clerk J. W. Morgan
. . , 2 : l '
Chaa. Hickethier
Sheriff B. P. Cornelia
Surveyor L. C. Walker
Assessor T. J. Wilson
School Superintendent . T. T. Vincent
Coroner . . . . . . C. W. Kanaom
Town Officers.
F. A. Bailey
S. T. Linklater
S. B. Huston
O. '1'. lied ford
K. Crandall
Trustees
Treasurer . .
Geo. W. Patterson
SOCIETY MEETINGS.
TI
ILLSBORO GRANGE, No.
P. OF
XI H. Meet in Good Templar' Hall,
aeoond and fourth Saturday in each month,
at 2 o'clock p. M.
BKNJ. SCHOLFIELD, Master.
J. A. Imbuie, Secretary.
HILLSBORO LODGE. NO. 17. I.O.O.T.
Meets in Good Templars' Hall, every
Saturday evening, at & P. M.
C. T. TOZIKK.
K Hiamish, SccV. W.C.T.
M'UALITV LODOK. No. 0. A. F. A A. M.
J Meets on Saturday on or after each full
moon. All brethren in good standing are
cordially invited to meet with ns.
F. A. BAILEY,
It. Ciindali., Sec. 4 W. M.
MONTEZUMA IjODGK N. ). I.O.O.F.,
HillsUtro Meets every Wednesday
evening at 1 o'clock. Sojourning brethren
oordially iuvitad to attend.
M. COLLINS.
It. Hkamh. Shc.
IO LODGE, No. lit, K. t)K 1., lIILLs
BOKO Meets every Tbumlny evening
at 7 o'clock, in Odd Feliows' Hall. Sojourn
imr brethren in good Htandiu; cordially in
vited to attend. S. T. lirsKiTra, C. C.
T. S. Wkathkbreo, K. of It. and S.
G1 LENCOE "LODGE No. K. OF P.
W MeetH e fery alternate Saturday at 7
o'clock p. in., at Glencoe. Sojourning breth
ren in good stuuding cordiaUv inviteil to at
tend. 1. W.VOUEY,
J. 8. Jackson, K. of It. A S. ;AVC-
HILI.SBOKO LODGE No. CI, A.O.U.W.,
Hillsl)or Meets on the second and
fourth Tuesday of each mouth at 7::? o'clock
p. m. Sojourning brethren cordially invited
to attend. B. C BAND ALL,
W. p. Habb. Bee. ' M. W.
1JUCENIX GBVN'GE N. P. or If.
Meets at Gaston, Or., on the third
Friday of each month.
E. H. PARKER, Master.
Jjun Wkiib. Secretary.
AXfAPATO LODGE No. 40, I. O. O. F.
Meets in Gaston on the lint and
third Saturday in each month.
JOHN WERE, N. O
H. P. Bbt ant, Secretary.
CHARITY LODGE No. 75, I. O. O. F
Tualatin Meets Saturday evening, at
7 o'clock, on or before each new and full
moon. Brethren in good standing invited to
ttend. J. C SMOCK.
S. N. Pqoi-e, He. N.O.
BUTTE ORANGE, No. 148, P. of II.
Meets the third Wednesday in each
Month. C. F. T1GARD, Master.
S. M. Kkmo. Sec'y.
T C. T. V., IHLLSBORO MEETS
We on the first and third Wednesdays
of each month, at 3 o'clock p. m. at the
M. E. church.
BAND OF HOPE, IHLLSBORO MEETS
every Sunday afternoon, at 4 o'clock
at the M. E. church.
CHURCH NOTICES.
H
ILLSBORO METHODIST PASTOR'S
Appointments. First Sabtmth in each
month: Beaverton. 11 a.m.: Wesley Chapel,
'A p.m.; Mt. Harmony, 7:30 p.m. Second Sab
bath: Hillsboro, 11 a. m. and 7::U p. in.,
and at Fartuington 3 p.m. Third Siddiath,
Wesley Chapel, 11 a.m.; Beaverton, 3 p.m.;
Reedville, V.'.Vi p. m. Fourth Sabbath
HilUtoro, 11 a. m. and 7;:M1 p.m.; and West
Union, 3 p. n.
V. M. BRYAN. Pastor in tharge.
CIORNEUUS METHODIST PASTOR'S
J Appointments. lirst and third Sab
imihs in each month, M. E. Clhurch. Cor
yeliua, at 11 a, M. and 7 h. m. Second and
fourth Sabbaths in each month, Glencoe, at
11a.m. Fourth Sabbath, Oak Grove, at 3
. u. Senond Meacham's Sabbath, echool
uotise. at 3 p. m. Satunlay before the sec
ond Sabbath, lteisv's sirhiMilhouse at 7 P. M.
II. B. Elwohthv, 1'astor in ('barge.
CONGREGATIONAL
PASTOR'S AP-
V Douitiueuts. First S;.V.I:itU in each
zcontb, Gaston, at II A. m.; ana mitue inn,
Lack of Gaston, 3 v. M. Second Sabbath
At Hillside hchool-houst, 11 a. m.; Green
ville, U m. Fourth Sabbath -Hillaljom,
tiitirttian church, at 11 a. m.
A. S. VENEN,
Watchmaker and Jeweler !
HAS PERMANENTLY LOCATED IN
Forest Grove, luid is. prepared to do
all kinds of Watch work. JewJrv repaired
and made good a new. Fine Watch Re
pviriuea sueoialty. Having had 14 years'
experience in the business, I am wife in
civuu! a WFitteu cuarantee with all work
ieutut. fal-Vtfl A. S. VENEN.
. 3IH1'V to IOIIII.
I will .oaii money in stuns of $1000
and upwards. Only real estate security
aouht. Time, three to five years; com
mission not to exceed per t ent.
W. II. ltl'l'KFJt.
jan7t;
Land for Sale!
MIE VNDERSIGNED HAS FOR SALE
I several Farms and a large amount of
Brst-class, unimproved land, lyiiu in Wash
ington county, Oregon.
IMMIGRANTS
And others desiring to purchase land would
to well to give me a call.
, to give i
Now is the time to secure comfortable
homea on easy terms. ,
THOS. D. HUMPHREYS.
rtiilsboro.Uune 2!HL. ldflL'.
RESTAURANT,
At Old Stand, . on Second Street.
Board and .Lodging.
Excellent Accommodations
GEO. SQUIBES, - - Prop.
nU-tf
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
M. ROBINSON, M. I.
Physician, Surgeon and Accoucheur,
Beavebtos, ... Oaaoos.
Kasidence First House East of Post-
office, sooth side of street. ml0-3m
C.
W. MILLER,
Attorney at Law,
Portland, : : : Oasoow.
Office Booms 12 and 13, Malkey Building,
Cor. Second and Morriaon streets.
Branch Oftlct at Forest Grave, Or.
J"AU kinds of Legal Business carefully
attended to. j-ti-tf
s.
B. HUSTON,
and Notary Public,
Hilibdobo. : : : Obkoon.
Office : Main Street,
Next Door to Bbick Block
jlLMf
N. RARRETT,
Attorney al haw,
AMD
Vevty I hat. i'lOneeHtiuft Attorney,
iiii.t.suoiio, - - - - - - onrx.ox.
Office iit Chenette Kow, Main street.
a7tf
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
Hills bobo,
a7-tf
Obeoon.
E. MILLER, M. D.,
U0M(E0rATIUST,
N. E. Corner First and Main Streets,
PORTLAND.
MEDICAL AND SURGICAL.
Diseases of Women a Specialty.
Office Hours 1 to 3 P. M. jn2S-tf
P A. BAILEY, M.U.,
J'luskiuH, Stiryeon at.d Accoucheur,
UII.l.MlOllO. DlltiOS.
Office In ('hennett's Row. Residence
Three blocks south of drug store. Office
hours From 8::?0 to II . m.. and 2 to 5 p.n.
g T. LINKLATER, II. B., C. M.,
Physician, Surgeon and Accoucheur,
Hii.teyioRo, onidox.
Office At Residence, East of Court
House. J7-t
IION BOWLBY.
Pfiysician, Surgeon and Accoucheur,
FOREST IIHOVK, ORKIION.
Office At the drug store. Jal tf
T
"ROMAS II. TONGUE,
Attorney al Laic,
IIIM.SHOHO, WASllINtiTON OtWNTT, ORKOON.
M tf
KUtUIII STorr,
JOHN B. WALDO,
BBNKCA 83AITII.
HAM. R. STOTT,
W. L BOISK.
CTOTr. WALIM), SMITH, STOTT &
BOISE,
Attorney at Law,
N.H. .r, ti. 7, and t Waldo Block,
Cor. Seeond and Washington streets,
PORTLAND, OREGON
'JF'IIOS. 1. HLMPHUEYS.
Notary t'ublie and Conveyancer,
nit ti.oiio, ouanoN.
Office In New Court House. Legal pu
llers drawn and collections made. Imsineew
entrnateil to luy care promntly attendet to.
mhll tf
W. H. Adams.
I'. S. Grant Mamivam
DAMS & MAUQUAM, -
Attorney al Iaw,
7 and 8 MulUey Building, cor. Second and
Morrison streets,
jy-tf Portland, Ob.
J AV. CILKEY,
Physician and Surgeon,
GREENVILLE, - - - ORF.GOX.
Offers his services to the people of Green- I
ville and vicinity. !f-:n
E.
MILLKK,
Notary Public,
Real Estate, Collection, Insurance sua"
Loan Agent.
Z if Promissory Notes Bought anl Sold.
-tfMoney Loaned in any Sums desired.
Foukst Gbove,
Obeoon-
jy II. TYSON,
11
Notary Public and Conveyancer.
Real Estate Boroirr ai Solo.
Residence, : : Smocks Station.
PostofSce, : : : Middle ton.
iul"J-tf Wasliiugton Co., Oregon-
K. SIXOX,
OF FOB EST GROVE.
IS NOW MAKING TEETH FOR 5 Of)
and T.Ti per set; best of material nd
workmanship. Will compare with seta
costing . Teetb extracted withoert pain.
Fillings at tbe lowest prices. All work
warranted. Otnce. 3 doors north of Brick
tore. Otuoe hours: A. M. to 4 k'.M.
dtf
. R. CORNELIUS,
DEALER IN-
Dry Goods,
Groceries,
BOOTS,
SHOES,
HATS,
HARDWARE,
Agricultural Implements
ETC.
Af;ent for the
DUBUQUE-NORWEGIAN
Flows & Harrows
The Best in the Market.
iOIDTJOE
Of all kinda taken at the highest, market
price.
Cornclins, ( r., Nov. , iI-1t
P. M. DENNIS,
FIRE INSURANCE AGENT
(Succeasok' to (. T. To.ier i,
IHLLSBORO, - - OREGON.
ALSO.
KKAL KMT AT K AUKXT.
8'
J FECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO THE
purchase aud sale of Farm 1-uuU ru-.d
Tiiwn Froperty
Notk. Having purchased of Mr. ('. T
Tozier his Insurance business. I au run.
ruleiit of being able to jjive satisfaction,
ince I represent the leading ltisurniice
Vnipiiies.
Z-f tlJice: One door South of Pottoftiee.
m3l-tf
M. BROWN.
G. F. JOHNSON.
JOHNSON & BROWN,
Contractors and Builders
IHLLSBORO, OREGON.
T L A N S, SPECIFICATIONS, AND
L Estimates furnished npou application,
f r any class of builvlintr. jli-ly
GET YOUR TINWARE
FROM
Tom'o Tinshop!
Roofing, Guttering and Spouting
A SPECIALTY.
ftT" Yon can be sure of a Square Deal.
Opposite Brick Block.!
IHLLSBORO. OREGON.
THOS. MADICAN.
jl-'ly
D. S. STRYKER, D.D.S.,
riHK LEADING DENTIST.
1 Eastern Prices. Good Sets
f Teeth. ."..ls to I '.. E-
tractin. M cents. Fillintr. .f 1.0O and nt
wanl. Klec-trieity iismmI for the Painless
Extraction of Teeth. Try it. All Ojwr.'i
tions First-Class. J-f"Si.ii of the Toth
107 First Street, over Preiit ice's,
nlO-tiui PORTLAND, OR.
SEWING ACHINE AGENCY,
forest GROVE, oiti:;o.
J. W. H ADKINS, - - - Ajjent.
DEALER IN AND REPAIRER OF ALL
kinds of Sewing Machines.
Domestic, Household, and all makes of
Standard Sewing Machines kept constantly
on hand and tor sale at lowest market
prices. au5-tf
I
11. SCHCLMERICK.
O KXH
CITY
Market
SKIOXD
IHLLSBORO, -
NT It K KT,
- - OllK'lOX
ALL KINDS OF-
i Fresh Meats
Kept constantly on hand and sold
FOR
JyUigheat Market Price paid for
AND
Mutton Sheep.
Please give as a call.
Srill'LMEItH'K ii liOCTI,
I'roprietora
oU-tf
Hillsboro OoU 13. 1987.
S. HUGHES & SOU.
FOREST taiOVE, OlttliOX,
Dealers in SHELF anp HEAVY
?
laddlery I Han
STOVES and
!
FAiraERS'&MECHAIHCSl
TOOI,S !
FINE CUTLERY !
Such Knives. Sci:irs find Razors, of the
Finest I'-RiiuK 1
We handle no SlnKh'y nor C-iciip John
Goods; but tor articles of like qna'ity oi
j;rade, we deiy coiitp-t itimi i:i price.
s. iii ;iii:s & S4ix.
ol'l-tf
ri:Li:s:ATa.!
Wanato Plow
D. J. FOSTER,
II a ii ii fa f 1 1 r" i
ANION.
rpius PLOW HAS NO SUI'ERIOi;
JL for all classes of work ml in all kiiul.
of soil. Easy draft and durable. For par
ticulars, address me or call and M-e the
plow. - - -
D. J. PORTER.
Gaston. Or., March ?- 1SS7
m?4-j
Seeds !
For Goorl and Reliable Seeds of all
kinds, Send to
Miller Bros.
! Sorond Street.
PORTLAND.
Also, Fruit Tree's. I?ee Supplies, IVme
Aleal, Garden Tools, etc., etc. n." liu
Tin-: ;i:at
Hock Island
AND
Albert
Lea
The Direct and Popular Line in conn elion
with the NOUi TIERN PACIFIC KAIL
WAV froni St. Paul .-aid .M uir.r.iklis
To Chicago and the East.
To St. Louis and ths South.
To Des Moines, Leavenworth,
Atchison and Kansas City.
The Only Line
Couneetiii with the OREGON SHORT
LINE at Council Bluffs, St.
Joseph. Leavenworth and. .
Kxiisas City for
Chicago and all points East !
PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPING AND
PALACE DINiNC CARS
Accompany all Thronh Express Trains.
Tickets fcr Sale by all Connecting
Railways, and Connections made
in Union Depots.
For full information regarding Rates,
Maps, etc., apply to
CHAN. Ki;XXFJV,
General Agent, No. 3 Washington Street,
PORTLAND, OREGON.
K. A. IIOMIKOOK,
GenL Tkt. and Pass. Agt. C. Rl I. P. U. R.
CHICAGO, ILL
H. F. IIOYH,
Geul. Tkt. and Pass. ArU M . A St. L. R'y
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
WASHINiT) LETTER.
7roin our Regular Corresiondeiit.l
p Washington. May 18, 1888.
)e lower Lrancli of congress
yUrated and steeped up to its
VU tariff eloquence. There
een a deluge of tariff talk this
j Speeches follow each other
) rate of from six to tea each
'oar or against the Mills tariff
S mtj be. On Tuesday there
!x speeches, three for the bill
ree against it. On Wednes
1 orators held the floor huc
. Jy. Yesterday several long
es consumed the day. To-
)Bsn. Randall, McKinley and
.Vsnridge, of Kentucky, will
ant their verdicts, and on Sat.
1 rtjl the prominent republican
Jwr front Maine, Mr. Reed, and
hilt all to theiuselvcs, and with
their gpecLes, it is uiulorf lood, the
debate on the bill will close.
The report han Wen current at
the capital that after the general dis.
ciission on the bill lias closed, its
consideration by sections, and tiuitl
action upon it will lx allowed to go
over until after the democratic nn
tioual convention at St. Louis. Ilie
purpose of this, it is Mii.l, would m
to get ft declaration on the subject
from the convention, which will
bind every member nf the party in
congress to vote for the bill, ami
thus secure its passage. Still, no
one knows what will be done about
the matter nt this time, nu.l it i
hazardous to venture a prediction.
A speech by liepic bcutatit o lut
teiwottli, of Ohio, against the Mills
tariff bill, was the feature of the
debate on Tutsday last. lie ad
dressed it full house- ami much at
tention w;t-p.tid him for an hour or
so after he had finished. He ac
filed that a tnntf was not, stiictlv
spuaking. a tax; it was a trade reg
ulation relating to that part of a
nation's business which extends to
the productions of other couittiies.
He said lie could not iituterntand
how any ltih Amei icau could stand
here as the closest ami most earnest
ally of Kngland, who was uttempt
iug to do to this country wh:rt the
had doue to the Irish across the seas.
He created a good deal of laughter by
reading an extract from the London
Times, declaria the only ' time
England has any use for au Irish
man is when he emigrates to Amer
ica and votes for free trade,
which he iuvaribly es.
The senate has been slowly doing
nothing this w eek, or rather nothing
of importance. One day it indulged
in a long, learned debate on the
constitutional question as to wheth-
er or not the senate h id power to :imf)ll,lt ajt,.r the legislat are extend
origiuate au appropriation, bill, j ,,,,.,, The biter acl of the leg-
Senator Hoar was the leading chain- j idature. he holds, to not have ext. ndel
piou of the exclusive authority of j ,hl. ; ,(ii(i,s r Mirvties.
the house. Then when the resolu- ... . . .,
tion confirming Mr. Turpie's light
to hid Kt'itt. U';lH r-allp.l lilt iinl ndont.
. c . i, . .
fd Senator (.handler k.-iw fit to ills-
sent from the broad declaration of
the committee that the senate had
no right iu such a case to question
the regularity of members of state
legislatures, and lwdieved that ex
ceptional case's might arise wherein
the senate should not so broadly re
linquish authority. This led to a
long discussion. Iut this remiss j
body has made a number of special
orders tor next week. For instance,
three bills for tho admission of
Washington. North Dakota and
Montana territories will be taken up
next Thursday, and it is thought all
three of them w ill be disposed of on
that da v.
The United States supreme eonr
r
denied tho application for another
hearing of the telephone case.
Your correspondent lives in sight
of the large and handsome church,
the Calvary Baptist, where the five
national organizations of the liap-
list cnurcu are noioing me.r
.... t i t , . i . . : :
of conventions, r rom the throngs ,
on the streets in tins vicinity, n
looks as if the city were full of Bap-
tist delegates. There are said to be
about three thousand delegates in
...
attendant e.
Washingioii grows in popularity
witli conventions of nil kinds. Dur-
in-r the ttrestnt monlh the lawyers!
from hII parts of tho United States
will mee t here in convention under
the name of tha national bar asso
ciation, and for the purpose of har
monizing certain matters of law
that cause trouble because they ore
o
different in the different states. The
Knights of the Golden I2iglo will
meet here about the same time,
8000 sliong, and give a grand pa
rade on Pennsylvania avenue, le
wides leinr beuqueted, balled, etc.
On the 21th inst. tb Catholics will
have a great gathering to witness
the ceremonies of the laying of the
corner-stone of their proposed uni
versity, 10,000 invitations having
been Issued. On the same day the
Towiah rabbis will meet m conven
.obis will meet in coiiveu-
... ... i
tiou in the YAasumgtou iifwrw
synagogue.
(iF.NFRALNLWM.
The Oregon Odd Fellows paid out
during the year 1887 for the relief of
distress tl0,943.r4.
David S. Fotheritighain has obtained
a verdict of $20,000 damages for false
imprisonment by the Adams express
company. He was messenger of an ex
press car that was robbed, and at the
time of his arrest was suspected of be
ing an accomplice of the robber.
The town of Roseburj? lias paid her
bonus of $5000 to a Scotch company
who will build aud operate a woolen
mill in that towu.
The Tillamook Grand Army building
association has been incorporated with a
capital ftock of $1000. Lx-ation, Lin
coln, TUlauiook county.
The hoard of asylum couuuissioners
,,e
furnishing G000 ikhiiiJ ot butter
to that institution at 30 cents ar
pound, to la deli vend during the year as
needed.
The CJold.-tidale Tribune has sold its
plant to the S'iitim-1, and Klickitat
county now has but one newspaper.
Senator 1'iy has r'Mitted th: river and
li .il-.r bill. Il :i propri u.w $21,:8H.
Sd.77, being an iucreas.' nf nearly tw
millions over the house hill. It will Is
over a hcn-W iH-fore the hill is tuLeii up.
9 1
Two shiMiters are in the Hnkcr (Tify
jail; one -hot an editor; the other shot a
call". Tin fellow wlioslioi a calf was
cinched.
The Michigan supreme court h is le
cidsl that the new local option law is
unconstitutional and void, Im-cjusc of the
t'.iiiure of the legislature to fratne the
hill in IciNi! form.
The Overland racking Co., of San
Francisco, has fail d; liabilities M)."i.:i22;
all.-.sl asM ts, 211,000.
The Staliiede tiuinel, on the Cascade
division of the Northern Pacific, is now
open to traffic. It is iS50 feet long.
Reports from California say that not
since 1S77 has there been such a dry
sjs il jn that state as exists, now.
formerly ,
The M -abler Walla YYaila
u-cil a- a c tliicr. has gone on the doA
to b- r huilt ;m turned into a passenger
steam r. The work will take several
ncaithx !in-l will cost about 200,000.
At Seattle la?t week, It fens' Colctoatl
turned over to Judge Jotes, of the dis
trict court, his findings of facte find evi
dence in the civil cafe against ox -Treasurer
Hill of King county and his lsiudn
lucii. The referee finds that the total
amount that Hill is short in his ui counts
to Is; ?G,yi0.78. Of this amount he
"Jvi's the comity judgments against Hill
and his sureties for 21.910.:M. The
remaind. r. 22,0111. the county lows,
as the referee tiniN llwit Hill defaulted ill
lie lather and mother ol youtii
i Wright, the Inv who was murdered near
Yaiuin:i last week, are divorced.
1
At
the funeral, or the intervening time be
Iwitn the murder and the hiui.d. not
on-1 of the childrer would sp-uk to the
tnot her, although l hey mm-hi several
hours in prayer for 'the forgiveness t
the assassin, forgetting entirely the dear
mother who hid wjtch si over them in
the cradle in the djy of their help
lessness and refusing to erli-r a word of
consolation to the woman who jave tin in
birth in her hour of lieivaveiuetit . C'or
valli Times.
In the cast! of Marion R iih.iin vs
the N. I. It. R. Co., lh jury found a
verdict for plaint it)' in the sum of $1,
000. which was cut down to 1030 by
'the judge. The jury was composed of
! twelve as fair minded in -u as could 1
found in (fohimhin county. -Mist.
Ulysss S. Grant, jr., is h iving some
difficulty with his magazine, the Cos
mopolitan. Schlicht A; p'ield, the coin
pany who wen tli! in.iin hackers, failed
a few days ago, and now it is sail the
i m.);r,z;n;. I!IV. Is,
(I ran t was
vice-president of the company which
; iu1,!iwt If U ,,drst.al that he
iM(t ?10() 0lK, infj( .iiTtW w!i .,. if
, y (. , V itii hu ,,, rV ,,,
!
At the s'M.Ml oi tlnj llHH ! l-olillllUtee
. . .
j tA hiturdy, i.u.ig-r i.juo-
uueei a mi'iioer oi cmpi-iye ao i e.
employes of the government printing
offi -e, wh testified thit thy contrihuted
sums ranging from '17t cents t- f 10 each
to tho democratic cauisigii fund last
autumn in New York.
Boston h ts jii'.t receive-. I from Afri"a
the largest gorilla ever I.m.L-d in this
country His nam is lack, an I h is
fivefeoft iu hi.dit when standing inrt,
ami measures from the en I of one out-1
stretch .si h iu 1 1 1 th other, s !vvn feet.
He weighs about 121 pmul., an 1 cx
hihits cti iriiiotis rength, compared with
which a m ill scjius like a child. II; ar
rived in a large bn m id.! of planking,
twj ami one-half inch; thi -k, and wheu
being remo vol from th i shi;, hi tore
Lirge splinters fr.un th'hirdwoel planks
. ,
1 with as lunch ease as a
hill Would
i , .
breaaaimg.
Is the Protect! e Sjstf.j a Correct
One f
(By an e -Con federate In Texas.)
I- rom a manuscript with the above
title, which has been submitted to
ua, and from which we make ft few
significant extracts, it will be seen
that Mr. Edwards, of Knois, Texas,
is not tbe only ex-confederate who
is not of the same rniud as his fellow-citizen
Chairman Mills. These
extracts show the drift of the
writer's argument.
The tariff is a question of more
importance than slavery, which
quarter of a century ago the country
was called upon to settle by war.
Shall lbs United States discon
tinue the tariff', or modify it so that
we shall have tariff for revenue
only?
If the purpose is to reduce the
as. V " -'JO'tUii
be a false step. One of two con
clusions is inevitable; either make
protection absolute, or declare free
trade. There can bo no half way.
In the United States we have an
undeveloped country , with avenues
for investment of more capital than
wo have to spire, and are constantly
borrowing from other nations. Oar
capitalists will not lend at two or
three per cent., because f hey can use
their money to Itetter advantage.
The workiugiuan is not forced to
accept pauper rate of wages, be
cause h ran do better by farming.
Hut is it expedient for the United
States to abandon manufacture and
rely upon her farming for support?
Is this going to make a prosperous
country? It inav do well for New
York mid lSouton, but how would it
affect the South, where money is
worth ten to twelve per cent, per
annum? Will it, not necessarily
stop nil development aud drive into
bankruptcy all who have already
engaged in the opening of our in-
jdtisttial resources?
J The writer concludes with an
'appeal to congress: "You must not
lose sigiii oi me i.ici mat li lias
taken many years of thought and
care to improve our sluep up to
their present condition. It has
cost enormously to purchase the
pure-blooil rams that were necessary
to use in gtaditig up the common
Mexican coarse-wool sheep to fine
merinos. All these years of labor,
care und expense have been under
gone by a worthy class of citizens
who have invested their all in sheep.
The welfare of themselves and fami
lies depend on the issue of the
tariff question. Are you not bound
to consider whether you have a
right to destroy this great in
dust iv?"
A w Oeparture.
The Klamath county (Oregon)
Star is a newspaper run for revenue
only. Atthe head of its editorial
columns it flies loth the pemocratic
and Republican tickets. It has sold
two parallel columns on its first
page for the campaign one to the
republican county central committeo
and the other to I he. democratic
county committee. One is headed
in bold black letters Republican
Column," and the other is bended
Democratic Column," in exactly
the same kind of tjpe. At tbe top
of each column the editor candidly
announces that he has sold the
space below or the campaign, and
is not responsible for anything np -pearing
therein. While the two
opposing columns conduct a wordy
and acrid warfare, the editor sits at
the receipt of customs, ami lakes
the pelf of Istth parties with equa
nimity ami it clejr conscience. This
feature of journalism is unique, but
it has its merits. The readers have
a fair opportunity of rending hide
by side what the opposing parties
have to say, aud can form a pretty
fair idea of what is sense and what
is nonsense. They also understand
that what they read is purely part-
izau and honestly paid for; there is
no deception, and everybody should
bo happy. With the subscribers it
is dimply "You pays your money
and you takes your choice." The
editor, lw ing a newspaper man, is
supposed to have no principles; ho
takes the money and makes no
choice. Hi method, however, is au
effective squelcher of the campaign
liar. That nimble rascal can't crawl
off the farm without being nailed.
While the Irish are sending from onu
hundred to two hundred thousand dollar
yearly to the poj, he sends them in re
turn. This is tho language of Mc
(Jlvnu. and he further says: Is it not
strange that while money is being col
lected in New South Walt and other
pkicc for Ireland, she sends this much
to the pot?
The Methodist conference iu New
York recently decided that la Jy delegates
sllouiu noi io auiuiiu-u 10 mat oouy.
Such vote was curried by oue majority
hta Istics of Hool.
SacrHinetito Record-Union.
A correspondent having asked the
Rural Yermonter certain questions
of interest to wool growers, it made
statements which brought the
Springfield Republican to it feet
with tho question why it was that
with a high wool tariff New England
had lost over COO.OOO, or one-third
of the sheep it had before tbe tariff
went into effect. The response of
the Vermonter is of interest to Cali
fornia wool growers, in considering
the question of wool on the free
list. The Veruionter quotes first
the allegation of the Republicaa
that "with the exception of a few
southwestern ranchmen woolgrow
ing with us is a mere incident of
farming." The Vermonter then
proceeds to
show, from
official
and 1800 a low wool tariff prevailed,
and the increase of sheep in the
United States was per cent. Uut
between 18(50 and 1870 a protective
tariff prevailed, and the increase of
sheep was 27 per cent., while be
tween 1870 and 1SH0 the increase
was about f 1 per cent, The increase
continued up to 18811, of both sheep
and wool product, when a reduction
of ten per cent, on tho tariff on
clothing uml combing wools was
ordered. Immediately there was
not great change, the wool aud
sheep industry indeed gained a little
during 11. but from the latter
date up to 1SK7 there was a sready
decline, until it itmouted to a falling
off of f. 1100,000 sheep. Had tho
protective policy as to wool prevail
ed, the ratio of increase in tho pre
ceding years, justifies the conclusion
that instead of a decline in 1887,
there won hi have been rt gain of
ti.OOO.OOO sheep. Tho importation
of wool bad risen from 78,000,000
pounds in 188, to 114,000,000 in
1887, when, according to the latio
of protection years, it should have
sunk to 40,000,000 pounds. It is
scare ly necessary to support the
Ytrmontet's case by giving the
reasons for these fluctuations.
They must bo apparent to all intel
ligent readers. When tho wool
industry was protected, aheep
raising was engaged in in order to
grow wool, not mutton. When the
protection was withdrawn, shecp
raisiug dediusJ to just about ilia
level of mutton furnishing.
A Hoy llreaks Info Store at Wash,
on Krai ami Takes Money and
Stamps.
List Friday night tho postofTice
at Washougal, W . T., kept in the
store f deary A. Herzig, was en
tered by a Fl-year old boy named
Chris. Ooebel and robbed. The
boy stole a sum of money, a quan-
tity of postage stamps, cutlery and
other small bhelf goods contained
in the store. Ho then went to La
Camas, where he stole a small boat
used for transporting tho mails from
the landing to the O. It. k N. steam
er and crossed over to the Oregon
side.
From this city Monday he return
ed a coat belonging to the Wash ougal
postmaster, stating that he
sent it buck because be could not
use it. At present the youth's
whereabouts is not known; but the
following w ill show that he is natu -rally
a criminal: Last summer be
stole a horse and rode it off to Van
couver, where he made an unsuc
cessful effort to Hell it, but before he
could consummate his purpose be
was arrested and taken back to
Washougal. Ho was placed in jail,
but broke out and got away. How
ever, he soon returned, but was not
prosecuted. If taken this time,
though, which is highly probable.
it will go pretty hard"wlth liTH!
COLLEGE JOURNALISM.
Cornell rii'.v.ndty to Have Hnrh a
Depart merit.
Ithica, May 21. Cornell Univer
sity is soon to have a department of
journalism. Classes are soon to be
formed, and l'rof. Smith will give
lectures on newspaper work in the
great cities, aud the work of a re
porter. Classes will then be organ
ized, very much as the staff of a
large newspaper. Prof, Smith will
act as managing editor, and assign
subordinates to various fields to
gather news. Young men will also
be taught how to write headlines.
The relative value of a piece of
news to different papers, as well aa
its relative value, will receive noma
attention. There will also be some
thing in tho way of editorial writing.
The professor will think himself
successful if ho can teach his class
to get news instead of rumors.
Prof. Smith is a journalist who has
IaIaIit 1 mi:ti i,-kiinetMil villi Neur
, I wire J a. .'.'.'- -- - '
i York papers.
r
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