Smoke signals. (Grand Ronde, Or.) 19??-current, April 01, 2013, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    PRESORTED
STANDARD MAIL
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
SALEM. OR
PERMIT NO. 178
.1 xrJji.
P-l PI 14
OR NEWSPAPER PROJ. UO LIBRARY SYSTEM PRE
1299 UNIVERSITY OF OREGON
EUGENE OR 97403-1205
nL.ij..rv.i
APRIL 1,2013
o
A Publication of the Grand Ronde Tribe
www.grandronde.org
TJTVEPQTJA.
3VrOIiAIiTiA
ROGUE RIVER
KALAPUYA
CHASTA
10 Years After
Tribal vetts
irennember
D iraq War
By Ron Karten
Smoke Signals staff writer
Among the members of the
Confederated Tribes of
Grand Ronde who served
in Iraq, two recently reflected on
their experiences at the war's 10th
anniversary, which occurred on
March 20, 2013.
"I joined for Native America," said
Frank Quenelle, who is living with
his two children in Tribal housing
in Grand Ronde, "and to have that
pride and honor for myself and my
family. I have strong blood lines
here."
His first priority, though, was
introducing himself through his
ancestors. His second great-grandfather
was Capt. Frank Quenelle,
who led the Indian police in Grand
Ronde in the 1880s and '90s, and
was a lawmaker for the Tribal
people. His third great-grandfather
was Chief Lewis Nipissing.
"I feel the honor and the pride
of having both of them among my
ancestors," he said. "Nipissing was
the last chief of the Umpqua."
Quenelle volunteered for the
Army because he wanted the honor
of representing his people and
experience combat "regardless of
outcome."
Frank Hostler, who is today in
the process of leaving the military,
went "to free people."
He understood the war's purpose
See WAR
continued on page 8
i
Photos by Michelle Alaimo
Eva Rosa Jurado, 1 1 months, receives support from her mother, Kim Roybal, as she participates in the 1 1 th
annual Agency Creek Round Dance held in the Tribal gymnasium on Friday, March 1 5. The two-day dance also
took place on Saturday, March 16. Organizers said that more than 350 people attended the event, making it
one of the most popular Round Dances held in recent years in Grand Ronde.
Laila Mercier, 6,
covers her ears as
she dances past
the drummers
and singers
during the event
on Friday night.
VjsMheJrihe,'s,
wBeaweBeBBBaBapT c
Eos
pagetoscc more phoi
"I
Proposed Cowliftz casino faces legal setback
By Dean Rhodes
Smoke Signals editor
A proposed Cowlitz Tribal casino within 15
miles of the Portland-Vancouver metro
politan area received a significant legal
setback on Wednesday, March 13, when U.S.
District Court Judge Barbara Jacobs Rothstein
ordered the Department of the Interior to issue a
new Record of Decision concerning its granting of
a Cowlitz reservation near La Center, Wash.
In her 12-page decision, Rothstein said that
the Department of the Interior violated the
Administrative Procedure Act by unilaterally
changing a Record of Decision after lawsuits
had been filed.
In December 2010, the Department of the
Interior issued a Record of Decision to acquire
land in trust for the Cowlitz Tribe. Lawsuits
were filed on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1, 2011, asserting
the department's decision violated the Indian
Reorganization Act because the Cowlitz Tribe
was not federally recognized or under federal
jurisdiction in 1934. (Rothstein did not rule on
this underlying issue.)
In March 2012, Clark County contacted the
department's counsel regarding documents that
were missing from the administrative record
that questioned the Cowlitz Tribe's historical
connection to the La Center area.
In October 2012, the Bureau of Indian Affairs
filed a supplemental Record of Decision, which
"replaced and superseded" the 2010 Record of
Decision, but did not change the ruling.
'The federal defendants cannot 'incorporate' a
2012 explanation into the 2010 ROD by charac
terizing it as a 'supplemental record of decision,' "
See CASINO
continued on page 6