Smoke signals. (Grand Ronde, Or.) 19??-current, October 01, 2010, Image 1

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OCTOBER 1,2010
A Publication of the Grand Rondo Tribe
www.grandronde.org
UMPQUA
MOLALLA a HOGHJE BIVER
KALAPUYA
CHASTA
Tribal Court
celebrates 20th
anniversary
on Oct. 12 .
By Ron Karten
Smoke Signal staff writer
Think of it as Tribal members'
just desserts. That's what
the Tribal Court will be serv
ing on Tuesday, Oct. 12, from 3 to
5 p.m. when staffers celebrate the
court's 20th anniversary of ser
vice to the Confederated Tribes of
Grand Ronde.
'Two areas where I see we really
impact Tribal members," said Tribal
member and Court Administrator
Angela Fasana, "are child welfare
cases and divorces. Child welfare
is probably 75 percent of the court's
docket and they represent the lives
of Tribal children and families. Being
at our court vs. being at the larger
state system, they receive a lot more
service's and attention here.
"In terms of divorces, it's really
a money issue. Our divorces are
only $92 and they're done in less
than 90 days. In the state system
they can take much longer and cost
hundreds of dollars."
Handling family law as well
as judicial review on record-type
cases for employment, enrollment,
housing, fish & wildlife license re
vocations and Gaming Commission
license denials, the Tribal Court
was establish in 1990 and the
Tribe's Court of Appeals in 2001.
The court also handles handgun
permits, tort cases, small claims
cases and election contests. It has
an indigent defense program, Tribal
Member Review Board, Peacemak
er Program and Court Appointed
See COURT
continued on page 5
y
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II
Photo by Michelle Alaimo
Grand Ronde Canoe Family member and Tribal mambar Kyonl Mardar makas adjustments to har cadar skirt,
with tha halp of Esthar Stewart, as sha prepares for protocol during tha Tribal Plankhouse grand opaning on
Sunday, Sept. 19. Opaning avants were held Sept. 17-19 and tha Canoe Family's protocol occurred on Sunday.
By Ron Karten
Smoke Signals staff writer
When Tribal member
Allison Empey was in
fourth grade, she made
a model plankhouse in school
and gifted it to the Tribe.
Her mother, Tribal Elder
Joann Empey, brought back
the memory as the Confederated
Tribes of Grand Ronde officially
opened a full-scale model near
Uyxat Powwow Grounds during
ceremonies held Friday through
Sunday, Sept. 17-19.
Many years, in coming, the
plankhouse represents not only
a new cultural landmark for the
Tribe, but for individual Tribal
members the opening heralds
individual growth in impres-
See PLANKHOUSE
continued on page 6
Kefibaclh ganneirs five NAM MY iroorcniDiraattDOims
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Photo by Michelle Alaimo
Jan Michael Looking Wolf Reibach
'Breakin' Free' up for Record, Single of the Year
By Dean Rhodes
Smoke Signals editors
In 2008, it was Flutist of the Year. In 2009,
Artist of the Year. So, how has Tribal mem
ber Jan Michael Looking Wolf Reibach
followed up those two prestigious awards at
the recently announced 2010 Native American
Music Awards?
Try a NAMMY leading five nominations, in
cluding Record of the Year for "Breakin' Free"
and Single of the Year for "What the World
Needs Now," as well as one other nomination for
"Rise Up," a separate compilation he co-produced
to combat homelessness.
Also try garnering nominations not just for
himself, but for the Jan Michael Looking Wolf
Band, which includes Tribal member Kenny
Sequoia Lewis, who plays lead guitar.
This year's 12th annual NAMMY Awards cer
emony will be held Friday, Nov. 12, at Seneca
Niagara Hotel & Casino in Niagara Falls, N.Y.
The Jan Michael Looking Wolf Band tied Joseph
FireCrow for the most nominations at five.
The Jan Michael Looking Wolf Band was
nominated for the aforementioned Record of
See NAMMY
continued on page 9