Capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1919-1980, March 29, 1949, Page 2, Image 2

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    2 Capital Journal, Salem, Ore., Tuesday, March 29, 1949
Oregon Senators in Angry
Clash Over Portland Bill
I- .By BRUCE W. WILLIAMS
The restless and trigger tempered Oregon Benate paced the legis
lative chamber here Tuesday morning and finally passed a reso
lution to create an interim committee to investigate the plausi
bility of consolidating the city of Portland and Multnomah county.
The vote was 25 to 2 with Sens. Frank Hilton and Irving Rand,
Neuberger Hits
At Legislators
'" Richard L. Neuberger of
Multnomah county delivered one
of his typically sarcastic speech-!
es Tuesday noon as he addressed
the Salem Kiwanis club Among
other sta'cmenls the senator
charged 'lint the republican ma
jority has ruled so long in the
state that they look upon as
heretical anything resembling
debate on a given subject.
"In the legislature a bill Is
Judged by the names that are
attached thereto," said the sena
tor. "In many instances the
legislators do no read the con
tents." This system he added,
"is a very poor approach to leg
islation." In his opinion the dairy and
dog lobbies arc among the
stronger in the legislative halls.
In this connection he pointed
to the fact that two quarts of
grade A milk may be purchased
in Seattle today for 35 cents.
In Salem or Portland the same
milk costs the housewife 41
. cents. Which, Senator Neuber
ger said, is a pretty good price
to pay for control.
Neuberger said Oregon is far
behind in the matter of social
legislation.
Legion Shown
Game Pictures
Members of Salem post No.
136, American Legion, at their
Monday night meeting, learned
of the effect of the cold weath
er on state game from films and
talks by Capt. Bert Walker, of
the slate police. Showing the
films for Walker was Sgt Les
ter B. Lent of the local army
and air force recruiting office.
Also presented by Walker and
members of the stale game law
enforcement group, which in
cluded Lt. Farley Mogan, Rob
ert Steele and William Fergu
son, were recent films and talks
on state game refuges.
Issues and laws pertaining to
veterans "and now being consid
ered were discussed by Rep. Da
vid Baum of La Grande. Rep.
Warren Gill, Lebanon, was a
guest.
During the business meeting
O. L. Donaldson, Jr., reported on
tho Legion's party and dance set
for Anril 11.
Guest at the meeting were the
commander of Aumsvillo Legion
post, R. L. Mickey, and the fol
lowing members of the post:
Clifford Gillespie, Bud Killlng
er, Bob Ball, Harold Porter,
Dean Roberts, Royal Holford
and Erwln Lohse.
Pinball Operators
Stubborn in Spokane
Spokane, March 29 OT Pin
ball machine supporters laid
plans today to bulk yesterday's
city council ultimatum that all
machines be out of Spokane in
80 days. '
Tavern and restaurant own
ers said they will circulate a pe
tition to have the ordinance re
ferred to voters.
The city chartei provides
that an ordinance is suspended
when 10 percent of the voters
who cast bnllols in the previous
election sign a petition to re
fer the question to the voters.
The petit ions would require
5000 signatures.
'BEST PICTURE
I IT.
"THE BEST DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR"
y VThe lives and loves V.
VW V OF G, s IN ITALY! 1 U
H GARSc)RE if!
STATE
-both Portland republicans, op
posing the resolution.
It was either the lateness of
the session or just a collective
bad mood, but the senators
pulled no punches and battled
back and forth across the cham
ber, bandying words under the
parliamentary allowance of
personal privilege."
Sen. Richard Neuberger,
Portland democrat, sponsor of
the resolution, told the senate
Portland is in a grcl tax cris
is." He said both metropolitan
dally newspapers generally sup
ported the idea.
Sen. Thomas Mahoney, an
other Portland democrat, ad
mitted that Portland and Mult
nomah county had major tax
problems. He ended his argu
ment with the remark, "Mrs
Air-Wick (Mayor Doiothy Lee)
has put a blanket on the entire
town and Portland s'.en will be
just a suburb of Vancouver."
Hilton opposed the resolution,
saying, "the consolidation meas
ure is purely a Portland prob
lem and it should not be touch
ed by the legislature "
Then came the remark of ig
nition. Sen. Fred Lamport, Sa
lem republican, declared, "the
icsolution is funoamentally
sound and I believe the only
reason Sen. Hilton l. against it
is because Sen. Neuberger's
name is on it." And the verbal
battle was on.
N'LRB Rules on
Picketing Ban
Washington, March 29 (VP)
The National Labor Relations
Board ruled today that a union
violates the Taft-Hartley law
ban on secondary boycotts when
it has pickets follow the prod
ucts of a strikebound company
to plants of other employers.
The unanimous decision upset
a ruling by a NLRB trial ex
aminer that peaceful picketing,
even in a secondary boycott, is
protected by the "free speech"
provisions of the Taft-Hartley
act.
In a secondary boycott, a un
ion striking against a company
seeks to persuade employes of
other companies not to handle
the goods produced by the first
company. That is outlawed by
the Taft-Hartley law.
Today's ruling involved the
AFL Printing Specialties and
Paper Converters' Union! Lo
cal 388 and Sealright Pacific,
Ltd., at Los Angeles. The com
pany, a manufacturer of paper
food containers and milk bottle
caps, brought the charges against
the union.
Tlie board said union pickets
followed trucks carrying Seal-
right products to the loading
platforms of Los Angeles, Seat
tle Motor Express, Inc., a truck
line and picketed the trucks
there. They also picketed the
docks of the West Coast Termin
als Co., where paper for Seal
right was being unloaded from a
ship.
ENDS TODAV!
F.ianwvM p,nti
Al.AN DONNA
LADD REED m
1
Second Feature
"BOHEMIAN GIRL"
A Laurel and Iliinly Ke-issue
MMnMPMIMSnMO
10 Mil Will HIT III' J
OF THE YEAR'
NA1IONAI BCM0 Of MVItVf
Starting
Thurs.
Price Cuffing
Spreads Fast
New York, March 29 P)
Price cutting of consumer goods
spread rapidly today, lifting
hopes that war-borne inflation
was making a last, losing stand.
Some of the price reductions
were big, some very small. But
the trend appeared to be grow
ing and the cuts were on a wid
ening variety of items.
Marriner S. Eccles of the fed
eral reserve board, called it a
'recession" that has been under
way for several months.
This," he said, "is indicated
by the decrease in the cost of
living."
I think that some recession is
desirable. We're getting at what
I call a healthy economic read
justment." Eccles made his statement in
connection with the board's low
ering of margin requirements in
the purchase of stocks.
The price reduction ranged
widely in extent.
Westinghouse Electric knocked
20 to 50 per cent off nine home
model radios. The dollar cuts
reached as high as $130
Kaiser-Frazer Corp chopped
$198 to $333 off its car prices.
Henry Ford II, president of
Ford Motor Co., saw a "possible"
reduction in Fords.
Willard Storage Battery Co.
chipped $1.50 off its $22.45 auto
mobile battery.
Two subsidiaries of National
Dairy Products Co. lowered
wholesale ice cream price in
Philadelphia three cents a quart.
At New York Borden Co said its
Pioneer Ice Cream division will
lower prices soon.
There was one reason given for
the cuts that appeared common
to all an increasing price con
sciousness of the buying public
Salem Navy Man
On Class Honor Roll
To a Salem navy man, Hos
pitalman Kenneth Walter Ham
ilton, Jr., has come the honor of
being one of those named on
the honor roll of the class gra
duated from the U.S naval hos
pital corps school at San Diego
March 25.
Hamilton, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Kenneth W. Hamilton of
305 South 25th street had a fi
nal average of 96.6 while the
average of the class, which had
as its company commander
HMC George K. Rudluff, was
mi.
The Salem man enlisted
the navy for three years as a
hospitalman through the local
navy recruiting office Septom
her 2, 1948. He is now awaiting
further assignment.
Padlock Bill Passes
The house passed and sent
to the senate today a bill pro
viding that any place can be
padlocked for one year if it is
used primarily for gambling.
Atf
Mm:. young
Packard owners call it "the xar
with the built-in brand-new feel."
And the fact is this newest
member of a long-lived line is the
huskiest Packard ever built!
Proof: Penny-accurate service
records, submitted by all Packard
dealers, show that the service needs
of the new Packard Eight are the
lowest in Packard history!
That's another important reason
why the demand for new Packards
is at an all-time high.
Naturally ... today's buyers
130-Hr
t(Tt, tr.r9
"I ,tJ f
In. r- Jf A. v TS 7- W
V4
'Beefeater's' Daughter Weds Yeoman Warder John Bur
rows, Tower of London "Beefeater," escorts his daughter,
Bethia, to her wedding in the Tower Chapel, London.
Salem Auto
In Wild Chase
Portland, March 29 m A
16-year-old youth was arrested
early today after a wild police
chase .through the city in pur
suit of a stolen automobile.
Patrolman Frank Trout re
ported firing five shots into the
air in a futile effort to halt the
racing car that reached speeds
as high as 85 miles an hour.
The chase began in the down
town westside district and end
ed miles away in the northeast
section. Trout and Patrolman
Fred Thompson overtook the car
at one point and ordered the
driver to the curb. Instead he
spurted out in front of them
again.
The car finally was found
abandoned and the youth, James
Kinder, was spotted hiding in
a culvert pipe In a .ditch with
his feet sticking out. A shot
was fired nearby brought him
out.
The auto, owned by E. S.
Benjamin, Salem, was stolen
from a Portland parking lo
last night.
Kinder told police he was giv
en a three-year suspended sen
tence at Burns March 21 on an
auto theft charge.
He was turned over to juven
ile authorities.
California's production of gold
and mercury leads the 48 states.
Such enduring
rrr1"
are impressed by the styling and
appointments of this luxurious
motor car. They're delighted with
its "limousine" ride and astounded
by the spectacular gasoline mileage
it delivers.
But most of all (at the prices all
cars are carrying today), they want
a new car that's going to keep
right on looking and acting new,
for years to come.
Your nearby Packard dealer is
the man to see. Now!
ASK THI MAN WHO OWNS ONE
EIGHT US-HP SUPER EIGHT 160
STATE MOTORS. INC.
Court Rules Japs
Can Own Land
The Oregon supreme court to
day ruled unanimously that
Japanese can own land in Ore
gon despite legislative laws for
bidding it.
The high court held that the
state's alien land laws, enacted
by the legislature during World
War II are unconstitutional be
cause they are "repugnent" to
the 14th amendment of the U.S.
constitution.
The legislature now in ses-.
sion however has repealed the
alien land laws.
The 14th amendment gives all
persons equal protection under
the laws.
The decision was written by
Justice George Rossman in a
declaratory judgment suit
against a Japanese father and
son and a woman who wanted
to deed her land to them.
Defendants were Kenji Nam
ba, an American citizen of Jap
anese ancestry, his father, Et
suo, who was born in Japan and
is not a U. S. citizen, and Flor
ence Donald, who owns the
land.
The high court ruled that "no
statute is valid which discrim
inates against the race, creed or
color" of a person.
City Sewer Bond Bill
Cities would be allowed t,o
issue revenue bonds to build
sewer systems by a bill pass
ed by the house today
charms !
- HP CUSTOM EIGHT
Prison Terms
For Two Yanks
Prague, Czechoslovakia, March
29 W Two American soldiers
have been sentenced to prison
terms of 16 and 12 years on
charges of spying against Cze
choslovakia, the official press
bureau said today.
The two men, under arrest
since Dec. 9, were convicted at a
secret trial last Saturday. '
The men were arrested when
they wandered across the bor
der last December. American au
thorities in Germany said they
were absent without leave from
their units.
Czech authorities insisted the
two GI's were on a secret mis
sion and refused the American
embassy officials the right to
see or talk with them.
The press bureau announce
m e n t said Alexander Jones,
alias Hunter, was sentenced to
10 years. Clarence Hill was sen
tenced to 12 years. The men pre
viously had been identified as
Clarence R. Hill, 31, of Jack
son, Miss., and George R. Jones,
22, of Owensboro, Ky.
U. S. embassy officials were
considering today what steps
they could take.
Frankfurt, Germany, March
29 VP) U. S. army headquarters
declared today that two Ameri
can soldiers convicted in Prague
of espionage "definitely were
not spies."
"They were not on any mis
sion, but were absent without
leave when they went into
Czechoslovakia," an official ar
my spokesman said.
The army identified the con
victed men as recruit George R.
Jones, 22, of Owensboro, K.,
and recruit Clarence R. Hill, 31,
of Jackson, Miss.
Solve Burglary of
West Salem Engine
A West Salem burglary was
solved Tuesday by Salem detec
tives in cooperation with an of
ficer from the Polk county area
when Leonard M. Benson, 2210
N. Hazel, was arrested on a
grand larceny charge.
According to a police report,
Benson admitted breaking into
the Amundson garage, 809
Edgewater street, West Salem,
on Feb. 9 and stealing a new
Ford engine.
Benson had installed the en
gine in his car.
McRae Advanced
To Detective Staff
Allen A. McRae, former city
patrolman, was scheduled to re
port for duty Wednesday night
on a new assignment to the
plain clothes detail in the Sa
lem police force.
McRae was notified of his ad
vancement to the detective staff
And it delivers here I I
for as little as III
2575.79
'State and local taxes, if any,
uhite sideualls ($21) and fen
der shields ($18), extra. Prices
may vary in adjoining areas be
cause of transportation charges.
Packard
Monday by Chief Clyde Warren.
His advancement resulted from
the resignation of Detective Ho-
bart Kiggins. Kiggins was re
placed on the day shift by De
tective David Houser.
The new detective joined the
force Nov. 20, 1945. Houser be
came a patrolman in January,
1942, and was promoted to de
tective work in June, 1946,
Display Bones
Of Mastodon
On exhibition for the first
time, at the Reimann real estate
effice, 201 South High street,
are the giant bones, teeth and
tusks of a mastodon and a mam
moth, unearthed two years ago
near Silverton.
The bones were uncovered by
a power shovel on the Paul Pin
son farm, route 1 Silverton.
They have not be'ore been
shown in a public place, but
have been viewed bj a college
scientist who has calculated
their age and the size of the ani
mals. A leg bone in the display
weighs possibly 60 pounds. A
tusk is estimated, when whole,
to have been 18 to 20 feet
long. Other pieces are a rib and
two teeth, one of a mammoth
and one of a mastodon.
It is estimated that the ani
mal that carried the leg bone
and the tusk weighed 24 tons,
was 14 feet high and 25 feet
long, and. roamed the Willam
ette valley from 20 000 to 50
000 years ago.
It is believed the lemains of
six or seven of the animals are
underground on the Pinson
farm in an area of 300 feet.
Since the bones were found
they have remained on the Pin
son farm. Mr. Pinson has oth
ers, including a skull of one of
the great animals.
Senators Divide on Rent Control
Washington, March 29 (VP)
Oregon and Washington senators
divided today on the senate vote
to approve the compromise rent
control program.
Democratic Senator Magnu
son of Washington and republi
can Morse of Oregon voted for
passage; republicans Cain of
Washington and Cordon of Ore
gon voted against.
Mat. Daily from 1 pm.
Lorerra van f
YOUNG JOHNSON i
Co-Feature!
Bungalow
lOMCOKWAT
MARMHT HAMHTON
KHAID (HOMWIll,
QUE
OPENS 6:45 P.M.
NOW SHOWING!
STRANGE! STIRRING) SPtCUCUlAtl
ATLANTIS
ENDS TODAY! 6:45 p.m.
Loretta Young
"FARMER'S DAUGHTER"'
Charles Starrett
'RIDERS OF LONE STAR'
TOMORROW!
Randolph Scott
WHEN DALTON'S RODE'
George Raft
"I STOLE A MLILION"
Starts Tonite!
r Opens 6:30 P.M. B-t
Starts 1:15 I J
John Wayne I f
Pedro Armendariz I I
In Technicolor If
"3 GODFATHERS" I
I Robt. Livingstone I jl
"DAREDEVILS OF I
II THE CLOUDS" III
II Cartoon - News
; rn
m
GAY CO-HIT!
Wallace Raps .
ion Bridge
Paul Wallace, a member of
the long-range planning com
mission, put himself on record
Tuesday before the Junior
Chamber of Commerce with
favoring the four-lane Division
street bridge In opposition to the
Baldock plan.
He claimed that lt was unfor
tunate that many people "got
the idea that the Baldock plan
had been offered to Salem on a
take it or leave lt basis." He
claimed that that Idea was not
true.
Then, he launched a discussion
of the plan originally prepared
by the long-range planning com
mission favoring a four-lane
structure to be located at Divi
sion street. Under that plan, re
gular two-way streets would be
continued in Salem.
The Baldock proposal en
visions a two-lane bridge at
Marion street and calls for the
future bridge, as well as the pre
sent structure, after improve
ment, to be used in one direc
tion along with streets in the
downtown Salem area.
Ends Tonight
"DUEL IN THE SUN"
"Campus Honeymoon"
TOMORROW!
An Entertainment
Ice-travaganza!
SONJAl )i
Hilarious Fun!
"BEST MAN WINS"
with Edgar Buchanan
Ends lonight!
"Command Decision"
"The An"-v riort" I
ON STAGE! j
THURSDAY
Only
Miller's
Spring A
E. D S r
I IHIIIVII nET UD
At 8:30 P.M.
ON OUR SCREEN
Tomorrow Thru Saturday
o
IN TECHNICOLOR
!
rtAA4A
dojtromoen"'
the wheels "spell
ing uiiw
mOILLS
. ..,. Claude r
USSre'"
),rmsi Worn
t...u iflmtan meels 1.
Lassie for Ihelii
time ai
. .. .'-mv in
Donald s nigra""! -the
mountains'-
S0N6S
The jolden-ioi"0,
star ol "Three Danng
Daughters" sings si
tongs'-
M-G-M'S
The Sun
Corner lip
Stomng
JEANETTE MACDONALD
LLOYD NOLAR
CLAUDE JARMAN, jl
and LASSIE
2ND HIT!
I Chester Morris in 5
I, "Boston Blackie'i I
I Chinese Venture"
I Also
Disney Cartoon I
I "Pluto's Fledging" 5
Warner News
340 No. High St.
Salem, Oregon