Capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1919-1980, November 24, 1919, Page PAGE SIX, Image 6

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    PA(iK S1A.
THE DAILY CAPITAL JOURNAL, SALEM. OREGON. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1919.
HIRE OPPOSITION
TO IMPORTATION OF
COOLIES REPORTED
: Seattle. Wash., Nov. 24. Strong
sentiment exists 'in the west In favor
of letting down the bars to Chinese
coolie labor, according to Frank C.
Jordan, California secretary of state,
who is here today.
Jordan is making a tour of western
cities to sound out the feeling regard
ing the proposal, which Was recently
' Instituted In California, that the Chi
nese exclusion act be amended so
that -Chinese coolies can be admitted
and allowed to work on the farms of
the west. -
The California secretary of state
told the United Press that he has dis
covered "only negligible" 'opposition
to the plan.
The object of the movement Is to
lower the cost of living, for unless
coolie labor Is secured, Jordan declares
there will be a shortage of food pro
duction in the west," and resultant
ligher prices.
The proposed Chinese coolie labor
er, who would be used in domestic
service, as well as work on the farm,
w.ould be under government control,
according to Jordan's plan. His
scheme calls for the 11 western states
to memorialize congress to allow the
entry of selected Chinese laborers.
"There is a problem confronting the
farmers," said Jordan, "and that is
labor. In California, we have very
little white. labor on the farms, the
work being' performed by Hindoos,
Mexicans und Japanese. American
born boys do not want to work on the
farms. Those who left farms and went
into the army have bad a taste of
city life and are not returning to the
farms. This means, reduced production
of food.
"There are 75,000,000 acres in the
west which could be cultivated and
made to produce food. Native born
Jabor is not available. My plan Is to
bring over Chinese. If the Chinese
tan be put to work on the farms, pro
duction will be Increased, even more
than doubled.
"It is imperative that some form of
labor he found for the farms, and the
only source of supply I can find is
China.
"The people who have farms and
who have had trouble getting needed
help are quite willing to see Chinese
on the Job. Business men take the
same view point, and so far as organ
teed labor is concerned I cannot, see
any reason why It has cause for ob
jection, as increased food production
would help that element. In any event
the Chinese would not be coming into
competition with organized labor."
residing at Silv'erton and Peter Ed
! ward Aaas, 50, Norwegian, Silverton,
today signified their intention of be
; coming citizens of the United Statej
when they signed 'declaration papers
i at the county clerk's office.
Alimony amounting to $1.'00, $40
each month for the support and main
tenance of Harry George McCraeken,
minor child, the cancellation of a
mortgage between Sherman G.-. Mc
Craeken und 1). K. Fletcher, -and a
large division of personal property
owned by Mr. McCraeken, were grant
ed to Esther May McCraeken today In
a divorce decree granted by Judge
Eingham.
Peter D'Arcy was a Portland visit
or yesterday, going down to address I
a meeting of the Ancient Order of
Hibernians, which was held In honor
of the anniversary of the Manchester
martyrs, at Hibernian hall last evening.
Mrs. Teresa M. Schoettle was In
Portland over the week end as the
guests of her brother and sister-ln-lavv,
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Barr.
A groun of women, all of whom are
forme? students fef the Capital Busi
ness college, met last, week for the
purpose of forming a social club. It
will be known as the W, A. M. S., and
will meet every two weeks.
J. A. Churchill, superintendent of
Instruction, left today for Pendleton
to attend the Umatilla county teach
ers Institute. Mr. Churchill will re
turn to Salem In time for the Marion
county Institute Wednesday, going
from here to Corvallla where the j
year's institute program will end with
the meeting of the Benton county
teachers. P. E. Carleton, assistant su
perintendent, will attend the l,inn
county Institute at Albany Tuesday.
R. P.. Ooortin, secretary of the stato
board tif control, returned Saturday
evening from Portland where he spent
severul days last week on state busi
ness.
C. H. Gram, state labor commis
sioner, went to Portland today on
business connected with the prosecu
tion of I. C. Clodfelter charged with
a violation of labor laws. t
C. XV Scott has bought an Interest
in the second hand store at 241 North
Commercial street, and the firm will
hereafter be known as Scott and Spier
A. D. Spier is the senior partner.
K. B. Brackrioy,- of Braoknoy ami
company of Portland, was a. business
visitor in Salem Friday and Saturday.
In correction of a statement made
recently In the Capital Journal that
the Ked Cross will forward Christmas
iiaukages to soldiers still in Europe, it
Is announced that there has been a
mistake made in transmitting the mes
sage from headquarters In Seattle.
The Red Cross will be responsible on
ly for packages sent to the Red Cross
personnel In foreign fields. Owing to
the small number of soldiers still over
seas, and the fact that Christmas
packages cun be readily handled by
their relatives and friends through
the regular post office facilities, the
Red Cross will not attempt to handle
Christmas packages this year.
Among the teachers who are in Sa
lem attending the teachers Institute
being held at the high school this
R'eek are the following women: Mary
Isabelle Boree of Corvallis, Judith E.
Burch of Rlckreall, Alice Mclntanh
f Monmouth, Itertha, Pavls of Cor
vallis and Mrs. J. P, Addison and
daughter of Portland. Mrs, Addison
will address the teachers on vital sub
Jects In connection with their work.
Karl E. Elnerson of Grand Forks,
North Dakota, arrived In Salem toduy
for a brief visit with friends in the
city. '
On a sightseeing tour of the north
west, Henry Gray, a resident of Liv
erpool, England, is stopping In Salem
for a few days. While here he Is dont
clled at the Marion.
Carl Gustave Nelson, 27, a Swede
WOMEN OF
MIDDLE AGE
How Lydia E. Pinkham's Veg
etable Compound Relieves
the Ailments of Change
of Life.
flashes, dizzy spelts and every month 1
m ill nmnUril'lil'ttV, miami
I had a constant dull
pain, and would
I always feel tired. I
suffered in this way
tor five or six vears
I and was treated by
a physician and took
different remedies
without benefit,
T.vdia. E. Pinbbam'a
IVegetable Com
InAiinil was reenm-
I mnnilrtl to me and 1
took it, and I believe 1 would never
have been well if it had not been for
the Vegetable Compound and Lydia E.
Pinkham's Sanative Wash. Iam recom
mending your medicine to all women ail
ing at I was, for I think it will carry
them safely through the Change of L'fe,
and relieve the ailments that come at
that period. "-Mrs. AlexieG Nanclb,
Galatia, III.
Women whosuffer from nervousness,
"heat flashes," backaeba, headaches,
and " the blues," should try this famout
root and herb remedy, Lydia E. Pink
ham's Vegetable Compound, and if com
it.inna .-rit write the Lvdia E. Pink-
L.. UxKoin Ca.. Lvnn. Masa The
result of their 40 years experience in
UCh eases IS at your service.
I 11 M M I I
I H IIIWU
1 .Tl
liiii, -r ill
Letts Capture Mitau
From Russo-GerjKa'is
Loudon, Nov. 24. Lettish forces
succeeded In capturing Mltau. from
Russo-Gerinan forces November Til,
after six hours' desperate fighting, ac
cording to a Lettish press bureau an
nouncement qnoted In dispatches from
Copenhagen today. The Letts entered
the town from the north and north
west at 5 o clock In the morning, the
dispatch said. At 11 o'clock, accord
ing to the dispatch, fighting contin
ued in the south of Mitau, the Russo
Germans retreating toward Lithuania
.;;'ylSr,sV ' STARTS TCMORROW-SHOWS Xt.i
"fr" ii , w ' fhpsssH - Grf OSS- Desire
sfKi.' l' 1 , ,7 - VS. -r - -r .
A ' ': I "The Miracle Man" tells a story.--A story that '
i " k rt.'- has in it more elements of entertainment than ' .
J'A 'V:- f fifty ordinary screen productions. As entertain-
l' J,V ment it is perfect! As -inspiration it is wonder-
r. A v '-:' :y : : 'i fun. k !
j 1 r':" NOTE-It's a picture you'll see regardless of !
I ;?;V 'v' I . Price or crowds. .!
Ill II ,2r '- S. II. . ' II li
I II f i . - - ' A S 11. - II 1
,.::::r::. ...'". SPECIAL MUSIC ON OUR WURLITZER I
ADULTS - . --' CHILDREN' v: " ipS
Including. War Tax B R f -if, " j ""' " j & f.m t, , ,f jj i t
' . rW rtMttniairf ii'urn mini;-1.1" nu
t count iv jmrl it in .IiiJco a nrioi-uni-i tjiiii'i V . l" B
Jr. CUiry who cause them." .1 SI 'Vll .t . . , WOB l. i,,-..;v. -.iwn -h I
lei bef lr oolweaF :
t State House Briefs.
Now Incorporations
The Valley Lumber company, cap
italized at $100,000 with offices at
Klamath Falls, filed articles of Incor
poration with the corporation depart
ment here Saturday. The Incorpor
ators are Henry D: Duvls, William I.
Harrrison and Lenore Rrewster.
Other corporations filing articles
Saturday were:
It. S. I-lughson-Holllngsworth com
pany, Portland; $5,000; R. S. Hugh
,son, W. B. llollingsworth, Jr., and T.
E. Anderson.
A. A. Warehouse company, Port
land; $5,000; Paul Stnlger, T. C. Al
bert and William A. Carter.
The Kalvelage Lumber company of J
Portland filed a certificate showing
an increase of capital from $15,000
to $75,000.
NATIONAL LABOR
party launched;:
The action of Judge Anderson was
o intimidate coal strikers, but fhev
-., 1 called his bluff," McDonald declared.
i Tho Non-Partisan delegation of four
Chicago, Nov. 24.' Delegates attend- from -Minnesota was still .standing on
Ing the national labor party convention tne slde lines today. They withdrew
here completed work of orffanlsation ! m V"!8 f"vc.nUoh, holding that thej-
, , , ,. . , , , not vvlsh to lose the identity of the ;
today. The platform was being drafted Non.rni.tlftlln ,ellgue in the Iabor ,.!
and probably will be submitted tomor-!ty. . . v I
row. . j
A resolution demanding "national- ' Kclio mills made the first shipment
ization of lands" was tabled by the i of flour this week for this milling sea- .
convention when representative of far-1 son. A carload was shipped to I'oii-I
iners' union protested.
Duncan McDonald, president of the ' tion
land consigned to the grain corpora
YUM! YUM! MINCE PIE
AND ": "
THANKSGIVING
Jot ns ilo jour Thanksgiving linking. Pics, cakes ilotighmiis,
n ud, ol course
BAKE-RITE BREAD
Our pin Bakery Products huvo that lloinc-lmle tnsto
BAKE-RITE SANITARY BREAD CO.
457 State Street M
dli.
t i
i!
x
.
MtMMMMIUMUMMMMtMUMUMM M M t M
Coming Tues., Nov. 25
Br. E. J. Hartung
Practipedic Foot Expert
SPECIALLY TRAINED IN THE DR. SCHOLL METHOD OF FOOT
CORRECTION, WILL BE AT OUR STORE FROM
Tuesday, November 25
to Tuesday, December 2
AN INVITATION IS HEREBY EXTENDED TO THE PUBLIC
TO COME AND INSPECT THE VARIOUS APPLIANCES' AND BE
INSTRUCTED IN THEIR USE BY DR. HARTUNG. AN EX- -PERT
PRACTIPEDIC AND RECOGNIZED A U T H O R I T Y OF
FOOT TROUBLES.
, i, - -
'
-..:.-' 1 ;.' ' . ' ;
Price Shoe Company
4
The largest and beat assortment of Rubber Footwear of all kinds in this
part of the state. We have what you want, come get them.
STORM RUBBERS
Men's Heavy, Medium,
and light....$1.80 to $1.25
Boys' Medium and
Light.$i;i5 and $1.00
Youths $1.00 to 85c
Women's..........95c to 85c
Women's Footholds or
Toe Rubbers ............ 75c
Same white 90c
Same Brown ....$1.00
Misses Storm 95c to 75c
Child's Storm 90c to 65c
BUCKLE ARCTICS
Men's .: ;..:..... $2.25
Women's $1.65
Pacs or Lace Rubber
Shoes, Red or black,
...$4.50 to $3.50
At the Electric Sign
'Shoes"
BOOTS
Men's Hip or Sporting :
Top $7.80 to $5.50
Men's Knee or Short
Top ..$5.00 to $2.75
Boys' short dull Heavy
..$3.15 to $2.98
Youths same $2.4G-$2.25
Women's Bright Boots
$2.40 to $2.35
Misses sizes 11 to 2
$2.10 to $1.95
Child's sizes 5 to 1014
-- -.. $1.75 to $1.45
Makes-Bostons Hoods. U. S. Rubber Co. Top Notch, all first qualities.
UmuliUa county must raise $275, 883
by taxation in 1920" on an assessed
valuation $-1,000,000 lower than in
1919.
THE BATTLE WON
Confidence in your physician
or the tonic that he may
prescribe, is half the battle
won. The consistent use ol
AMERICA MUST PLAY
PART IN EUROPEAN
AFFAIRS HUN CLAIM
i "America evidently wants it to re-;
main our European situation," the)
newspaper said, leaving France and
England to work "their bitter wills
against Germany."
i" By Carl IT. Groat I
I (United Press staff correspondent) j
Berlin, Nov. 23 America s position j
-in European affairs is not that "of a
j theater guest who can depart if the !
j ploy is displeasing," the Deutsche j
-jTages-Zeltung declared today j
) "America"! destined to have a tre-
always bCgetS COnfadence in and Russia may do." the newspaper!
latmea. nectanng that for this reason j
j the United States "cannot Temain ,
f aloof" . i
j The German press today generally j
accepted the defeat of the peace '
I treaty in the American senate as fin- 1
al and expressed bitler regret over
SCOTT'S
EMULSION
those who take it, Scott's is
a tonic-nutrient recom
mended by physicians
everywhere.
Let SCOTT'S helo
A you win your bttl
auzainat weaknau. 1
Bcctt some, BloomStli . It. J,
t the absence of American represents-1
: tion upon the commission to enforce
the terms of the treaty.
I Great
i- for -
Lunch
says.
Best
cornflakes
made are
Post
s
j