Wallowa County chieftain. (Enterprise, Wallowa County, Or.) 1943-current, October 07, 2020, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    THE WEEK IN PHOTOS
TUNESMITH SET TO KICK MAXVILLE HERITAGE INTERPRETIVE
OFF NEW SEASON CENTER HONORS PAST
THE BACK PAGE, A16
LOCAL, A6
136th Year, No. 26
LOCAL, A8
WINNER OF THE 2020 ONPA GENERAL EXCELLENCE AWARD
Chieftain
wins four
fi rst-place
awards
Wallowa
County
Voices
Paper wins General
Excellence award
and two for best
feature stories
Kayleen
Lewis
Lostine
Globetrotter
returned to
county
ENTERPRISE — Kayleen Lewis
is a Wallowa County native who got
some globe-trotting experience
before settling near Lostine.
Right now, she’s an accoun-
tant for Chrisman Development in
Enterprise.
Having grown up in Wallowa,
she and her husband, Bobb, lived
in Papua, New Guinea, and Malay-
sia for awhile.
“Then we came home,” she said.
The Lewises have fi ve children.
All live outside the county — includ-
ing one daughter in Australia —
except for one son who comes back
part time, as his wife is in veterinary
school at Washington State Univer-
sity in Pullman.
What’s your favorite thing
about Wallowa County?
The beauty of it. I just love look-
ing at the mountains all year long.
It doesn’t matter what season. I
love the trails and being out in the
woods. I really like that. Also, the
friendliness of the people.
The county has had a few
COVID cases. Are you
particularly concerned
about it?
Not super concerned. I think
COVID’s going to be around a long
time and either you get it or you
don’t. I take precautions because I
have elderly parents and I don’t par-
ticularly want them to get it.
What are you going to do
this fall?
Just getting the yard ready for
winter, and putting away ranch
equipment at my dad’s cattle ranch
on Alder Slope.
What’s your advice for
people who are thinking
about moving here?
Have a job fi rst and be willing
to adapt because we have a slightly
diff erent culture here. It’s gotten
better. People have gotten a little
more open than they used to be. In
some ways Wallowa County’s tribal
in a good way, meaning that when
people are hurting or in crisis, every-
body just rallies around and they’re
really good about that, where you
don’t necessarily get that if you’re
in a city. I think our culture ties us
together more than some places.
When you come from a big city and
you’re used to anonymity, you don’t
get that here — and that can be
good or bad.
— Bill Bradshaw
Wallowa County Chieftain
Wednesday, October 7, 2020
Chieftain staff
Bill Bradshaw/Wallowa County Chieftain
Chantay Jett, left, stands with her son, Keelan McBurney, at their Joseph home in front of a buggy she said will
be a project for McBurney to work on with his grandfather. McBurney’s left leg was seriously injured in May,
but he’s well on the road to recovery.
Back from the brink
Youth, who nearly lost leg,
well on road to recovery
By Bill Bradshaw
Wallowa County Chieftain
J
OSEPH — It was a tragic acci-
dent that nearly cost him his life
— or at least a leg — but Joseph
Charter School cross-country
runner Keelan McBurney isn’t
letting it keep him down by any
means.
It was May 15 when McBurney,
then 15, had gone to visit a friend who
lived about three miles south of Joseph
on the back side of the west moraine.
He decided to keep the friend, who
was the same age and has since moved
out of the area, anonymous.
See Awards, Page A10
JOSEPH UNVEILS NEW
See Brink, Page A9
STATUE
Event marks a turning
point for the walama
NiiMiipoo, better known
Band Nez Perce, and as the Chief Joseph
one more step in their
homecoming journey.
| A4, A10
BRONCS
BULLS
and
A SUCCESS
By Ellen Morris
Bishop
Wallowa County
Chieftain
T
he 15th annual
Mountain High
Broncs
Rodeo set new
records for attendan and Bulls
the number of
cowboys competin ce, and for
bronc riders and
g. Nineteen
with eight wild 13 bull riders competed, along
horse race teams.
Three present
and past World
ranch rodeo
Champion
winner was Juntura, bronc riders competed. But
the
Oregon,
buster Gabe McKay.
cowpoke and
bronc-
He took home
for mastering the
two horses he rode, a purse of $2,100
score of 155.5 points.
with a combined
See Broncs and Bulls,
The accident
“About 45 minutes later,” said his
mom, Chantay Jett, “I get a call from
his friend who is so distraught that he’s
not able to speak on the phone. I could
hear Keelan in the background and he
said, ‘Mom, I’ve been in an accident.
I think I broke my leg. It’s really bad,
you need to come immediately.’ ”
Jett said that the two had driven the
friend’s mom’s car down the drive-
way to the mailbox and upon return-
ing, McBurney was guiding the friend
into a parking spot at the house when
the friend thought he had the car in
reverse, but it was in drive. The friend
hit the gas, panicked and hit the gas
harder and pinned McBurney to the
house, crushing his left leg.
ENTERPRISE — The Wal-
lowa County Chieftain won four
fi rst-place awards in the Oregon
Newspaper Publishers Associa-
tion Better Newspaper Contest,
including general excellence and
two for best feature stories.
The awards are for work done
during the 2019 calendar year.
“I am very pleased that our
peers would recognize the Chief-
tain as a newspaper of general
excellence,” Jennifer Cooney,
general manager of the Chieftain,
said. “Everything from photog-
raphy, writing, editorial page and
front-page design were all con-
sidered. Basically, all aspects of
the Chieftain have been judged
amongst the best in the state. It
makes me very humble and thank-
ful for the work of our staff.”
The general excellence win
represents the highest award pre-
sented to Oregon newspapers and
entries are considered to be the best
examples of the industry, accord-
ing to the ONPA website. The con-
Enterprise, Oregon
135th Year, No. 11
Imnaha buckaroo
Riley
Warnock masters
his bronc at
Mountain High
Broncs and Bulls.
Warnock was just
0.5 seconds
shy of an eight-seco
nd ride.
Ellen Morris Bishop
Page A10
Wallowa.com
Wednesday, June
EAST VS. WEST
IN ALL-STAR
FOOTBALL GAME
26, 2019
$1
Bowlby Bash 20
19
By Ellen Morris
Bishop
as speedsters. All
Wallowa County
were of the small
Chieftain
required to be
front wheel to
inspected improve
before being permitted
the vehicle’s sta-
This year’s
to bility. “It would
Bash provided a Bowlby race. Rules for the
just tip
cars
fun and unique host of LQFOXGHG VSHFL¿F ZHLJKW over too easily without
booths to limits
explore, with local
depending upon them,” Aguilar said.
Other general rules—
and treats galore, goods the age and weight of
the or
along driver. Derby
with plenty of
racers driven are at least expectations—
activities by 8-12
that the cars be
for youngsters. From
year olds were
built, often from hand-
tle corn and face-paint ket- required to be less than
cast-off
250
ing
or
salvaged parts.
pounds for the total
New dragon boat
to sidewalk-chalk
Baby
weight
GHOHFWDEOH URRW EHHU art and of car and vehicle. Drivers stroller wheels are good.
events have been
the Bowlby Bash ÀRDWV 13 to 17 years of age could So are bicycle wheels and
added, including a new
offered weigh
even wheels from
something for
10-paddler event and
garden
everyone. pounds in at a total of 350 carts and
This year, the 16-year-ol
the game carts
for car
20-paddler boat races.
Kari Greer/U.S. Forest
Wildfi re season
d Vehicles with and driver. that hunters use
will approach its
event got its original
Service
to trans-
drivers ages port
peak later in the
year, experts predict.
A17
their deer out of
summer this
back, after having name 18 and older could total
the
no woods. All
enjoyed more than
a brief stint as Summerfe
derby cars have
550 pounds.
st
“It’s all about keeping to have brakes that work.
in 2018.
In some, that’s bicycle
the downhill speed
One of the most
cal-
of the iper brakes.
pated parts of the antici- cars at a pace that drivers
In others
a block that is applied it’s
Bash celebration Bowlby can control,” Aguilar
to
said.
soap box derby. This is the “Younger and less experi- the wheel via a hand-lever.
year,
Steering
enced
designs include
eight derby racers
drivers really need
Brooke Van Sickle
primitive, very simple
entered. The derby, were to go slower to be sure
rack
they and pinion
spon- keep control.”
and Cody Mawhinne
By Brad Carlson
sored by Greater Enterprise
designs as well
y
The
ZHVWHUQ ZLOG¿UH
Capital Press
plan to expand its
inspections focus pre-race as the wires that are more
Main Streets (GEMS)
DFWLYLW\
on safety. like
won’t start to increase
was One car, designed
boat steering. Agui-
inventory, keep its
largely organized
until
as a tri- lar’s creations
late June.
by Jorge cycle,
Mark Moore is ready
legendary friendly
Aguilar, Jr. There
with two wheels
include the
for
were
The coastal area of
DQRWKHU EXV\ ZLOG¿
categories: Creative two the back and one small on VFW’s racer and lots of
Wash-
atmosphere intact.
one work
son on southwest UH VHD ington and Oregon
and on the front,
Speedster. This
will
Idaho’s KDYH DQ
was required car. on the Number 1
year, all to literally
A18
rangeland.
DERYHQRUPDO ¿UH
He added a number
the vehicles were
of
entered ing wheels install train-
As chief of the Mountain risk. That means the num-
on each side See
ber of acres burned
Home Fire Departmen
Bowlby Bash, Page
are pre-
A7
crews must not only t, his dicted to exceed the 10-year
SDUHGWR¿JKWVWUXFW be pre- PHGLDQ IRU VLJQL¿FDQW
ODUJH
XUH¿UHV ¿UHV EHFDXVH
within the city
RI IXHO ORDG
limits
DOVREDWWOHZLOG¿UHVWKDWF but ing and drier-than-normal
roar across the countrysid DQ conditions.
e.
Some
The volunteer
Mountain ifornia of Northern Cal-
Home Rural Fire
will also have
an
Protec- above-nor
tion District contracts
mal
with QL¿FDQW ODUJH risk of sig-
his department to
¿UHV WKURXJK
assist
ZLOG¿UHVXSSUHVVLRQ with October because of an abun-
dance of grasses,
“We anticipate every
down and
year dead fuels
being a big season
and heavy brush
in terms growth.
RIZLOGODQG¿UHVHYHQ
PRUH
1DWLRQZLGH WKH
so because of the
ZLOG¿UH
vegetation we have type of season this year has already
pet fuel, so to speak,” — car- been busy, although not
as
Moore busy as in
said.
2018.
Year-to-date through
7KRXJK WKH ZLOG¿
June
UH RXW  WKH
look for the Northwest
QXPEHU RI ZLOG¿UHV
is nationwide totaled
mixed — some of
17,118
this
KRW VSRWV IRU ZLOG¿ year’s burning 459,776 acres,
the
ironically, along UH DUH NIFC reported.
That’s down from
DOO\ GDPS 3DFL¿F the usu-
25,661
the idea is to train FRDVW ² ¿UHV EXUQLQJ VOLJKWO\
PRUH
for any than 1.8
possibility
million
.
acres
Nick Jannuzzi pilots
WKH ¿UVW VL[ PRQWKV during
the Elks Lodge
The
June-September
racer towards the
Ellen Morris Bishop
soapbox derby.
RI ODVW
year.
fi nish line at the
regional forecast
2019 Bowlby Bash
from the
As of last week, six
National Interagenc
large
y Fire
Center in Boise predicts
that
See Fire season, Page
A7
East shows west
how character,
winning is done.
A9
DRAGONS IN
THE WALLOWAS
NEW OWNERS AT
IMNAHA STORE
AND TAVERN
Bill Bradshaw/Wallowa County Chieftain
Keelan McBurney shows the scar from a leg-saving procedure called
a fasciectomy, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, where skin was removed
over injured muscle tissue in May to allow the swelling tissue to heal.
He said he’s been told most of the scar should disappear over time.
Getting ready for
ZLOG¿UHVHDVRQ
This Wallowa
County Chieftain from June 26,
2019, was featured in the Oregon
Newspaper Publishers Association
awards for best design. The
centerpiece of the page is a story
and photos by Ellen Morris Bishop.
Three local measures
on November ballot
By Ellen Morris Bishop
For the Wallowa County Chieftain
ENTERPRISE — The ballots arriv-
ing in the mailbox during the week of
Oct. 19 contain three local measures that
will affect the future of Wallowa County
communities.
The Enterprise School District bond
would improve the security and long-
term viability of school facilities, the
local marijuana tax would provide more
income for the city of Joseph, and the
Greater Idaho initiative would require
meetings of the county Board of Com-
missioners to contemplate the conse-
quences of becoming part of Idaho.
“The school bond is important because
the needs are not extravagant. They are
necessities for safety and accessibil-
ity in a 100-year-old building,” Enter-
prise School Board President Kate Fent
said. “Even more important, the district
has been awarded a one-time, $4 mil-
lion grant from the state that will match
the bond, which translates to $8 million
worth of work for a price tag of $4 mil-
lion to the voters. If the bond does not
pass, the district loses the grant.”
The school bond is the most expen-
sive, and perhaps most consequential
of the measures on the ballot. If passed,
Wallowa County Chieftain, File
See Measures, Page A10
New secure metal ballot boxes have been installed outside
Wallowa City Hall and Joseph City Hall.