Wallowa County chieftain. (Enterprise, Wallowa County, Or.) 1943-current, October 10, 2018, Page A9, Image 9

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    Wallowa County Chieftain
wallowa.com
From A1
October 10, 2018
A9
Safe Harbors serves hundreds
By Kathleen Ellyn
Wallowa County Chieftain
Safe Harbors, Wallowa
County’s domestic and sex-
ual violence service provider,
assisted 105 individuals in
2017.
A dozen volunteers mon-
itor the Safe Harbors help-
line 24/7, according to Jamie
O’Neill, volunteer coordinator,
advocate and shelter manager.
Volunteers sometimes have
personal stories that motivate
them to help others who are
victims of domestic violence,
while others recognize it as
an important service and they
want to do their part to stop
violence, she said.
Working the help-line can
be an empowering and satis-
fying endeavor, said O’Neill,
and not all calls are tense,
emergency situations.
“One of the biggest things
we do is provide our clients
with information,” O’Neill
said.
Calls are not solely con-
cerned with physical violence.
Violence does not have to be
physical, but it must be hurtful.
Domestic violence is a pattern
of behavior where one person
in the relationship uses con-
trolling or abusive behavior to
maintain power.
Psychological and emo-
tional violence includes using
children as a leverage for
power, controlling money,
threatening to hurt pets, chil-
dren or partner, and blaming
other family members for the
abusers’ behavior.
In addition to meeting indi-
viduals at the emergency room
or talking to them on a phone
to help them contact police or
get to a safe situation, help-line
volunteers can also provide
information to friends and rel-
atives who want to know how
to help those they love.
“Maybe they have a friend
they’re worried about and
want to know how to help their
friend,” said O’Neill.
Help-line responders do
not do is tell callers what they
“ought to do” or personally
enter a potentially dangerous
situation themselves.
“Callers name what they
need,” said O’Neill. “It is
never us saying this is what
you should do.”
Help-line volunteers are
well trained. And Safe Harbors
would like to expand their vol-
unteer base, so they are offer-
ing a volunteer training pro-
gram, set to begin Oct. 29 and
running for four weeks.
Photos by Ellen Bishop/Chieftain
The pigs at Barking Mad Farm’s Slow Food Celebration (both on the table and in their pasture) are Kunekune, a New
Zealand breed. They are small, as pigs go, but easy keepers who like to eat grass, and don’t root up the ground as most
other pigs do. They are also pretty tasty.
Nathan Slinker accepts his grant award for
his Alder Slope Farm. The funds will help him
extend his growing season and productivity.
PIG-NIC
Kayson Grace Huddleston, age 4, gets to know Barking Mad Farm’s
Kunekune pigs up close. The young pigs were very approachable and
curious. They were one of the most popular attractions at the Pig-nic.
For more information: Slow Food Wallowas on Facebook
Continued from Page A1
Slow Food Wallowas puts
on a variety of events in the
county throughout the year.
Each event is a celebration of
local food and food producers.
Up next is a planned screen-
ing of “How We Grow” at
the OK Theatre in Enterprise.
The 2017 documentary is the
story of young farmers build-
ing community around locally
grown food.
Slow Food Wallowas chair-
person Lynne Curry pointed
out that the full immersion cel-
ebration, which included pet-
ting and admiring live piglets,
butchering a hog and enjoying
pork dishes, was in line with
the movement’s effort to rees-
tablish a connection with food.
If the experience made
people uncomfortable, she
said, they might be moved to
champion humane treatment
of livestock, or learn more
about the “Food for Change”
campaign that asks people to
think about how they eat, shop
and approach food.
OPEN
Ted Daggett had a wonderful pumpkin patch in
Joseph this year, his fifth as a grower. His largest
pumpkin weighed 43 pounds. Ted was born and raised
in Joseph and will be 80 next month. He has lived in
the same place since 1976. Ted and Virginia thought it
would be interesting and fun to see if pumpkins would
grow on their land. Crops have been bounteous. Ted
was the Wallowa County weed officer 1978-97.
WALLOWA COUNTY
Health Line
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WELCOME HUNTERS!
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209 NW First St., Enterprise • 541-426-4567
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