The Bend bulletin. (Bend, Deschutes County, Or.) 1917-1963, May 08, 1962, Page 7, Image 7

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The Snd Bulletin, Tueay, My 8, 1962
Raft begins
5-year trip
around world
REDONDO BEACH Calif lUPD
fatlot No.
STUB
To Bt Torn Off ly Tho Chairmri
H 1
A crew of six men and two
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1s
1 tJ&JS tM- JiV.-.CllvA J
' MARDI GRAS CHAIRMEN Mrs. Robert Cutter, left, and Mr. Charlej Krelder, chairmen
for (hit year's Bachelor Butte Mardi Gras which will be held May 30 at I p.m., place some of
the decorations in place near the ski lodge. The theme for the Parade of Costumes will be
"Fairy Tales."
Farmers urged to vaccinate their
pigs against cholera this spring
WASHINGTON tUPD-The Ag-1 which affects hops only, but avail
riculture Department has appeal-1 able vaccines are effective and
ed to farmers to vaccinate their safe when properly used,
pigs against hog cholera this j The department emphasized
spring. ' that spring is the peak season for
The department sajd that the i vaccinating against cholera. Pigs
disease kills more pigs after
weaning age Uian any other single
disease.
A high level of vaccination Is
a vital part of the state-federal
campaign now underway to eradi
cate this costly swine disease, ac
cording to Dr. U.J. Anderson of
the Agricultural Research Serv
ice (Ai?S i.
"It's particularly important,"
Anderson said, "that pigs in tran
sit be protected by vaccination,
because they have a greater
chance of exposure to tho di
sease." Federal regulations proposed
for the eradication program call
for proper vaccination of swine
that are shipped across state
lines.
Only about 45 per cent of the
hogs in the United Slates now
are immunized against hog
cholera An increase in vaccina
tion will cut down Uie possibility
that the hog cholera virus will
find a susceptible pig in which
to multiply.
"An infected Iwg, in effect, is
a vims factory," Anderson said.
Congress authorized the depart
ment last fall to establish a Na
tion Hog Cholera Advisory Com
mittee with a department official
as chairman. Anderson was desig
nated chairman.
In addition to Anderson, the
committee is made up of repre
sentatives of the swine and re
lated industries, state and local
governments, professional and
scientific groups, and the general
should be vaccinated about two
weeks after weaning. At this age
they are easily handled and will
be protected before shipment.
Several African countries re
cently took a look at the Euro
pean Common Market and ap
parently liked what they saw.
They have taken steps to estab
lish their own common market.
Representatives of Algeria, Mo
rocco, Guinea, Ghana, Mali, and
Egypt met in Cairo, and adopted
these general plans:
Member states agree to estab
lishment of a customs union; co
ordination of the tariffs, customs
systems, and legislations applied
in each of them; adoption of a
common policy in relation to basic
products: and the unification of
customs classification methods.
Each member stale within
five years from date of agree
ment agrees to abolish all tariffs
on its imports from other member
countries through progressive re
ductions. A permanent body called the
African Common Market Council
shall be set up to supervise im-
i plementation of the agreement.
Market is to be open to all
African states and to be based
on free exchanges of goods and
products.
Storke is given
commendation
'World Mother'
award made to
Glenn's mother
More than 5.000 outbreaks ofjfrom qOVemOr
hog cholera were reported last I
year in 46 states and Puerto Rico. ! SANTA BARBARA, Calif. fl'PP
There is no cure for the disease.
Nilsen draws
fire on Infante
Thomas M. Storke, editor and
publisher of the Santa Barbara
News-Press, today received com
mendation from Gov. Edmund G.
Brown for winning the 1M2 Pulit
zer Prize for editorial writing.
In a telegram to Storke. Brown
said: "Congratulations on winning
the Pulitzer Prize. Your exposure
nf the John Birch Society merits
DAYTON. Ore. IPI - State tne A(.Ppex resp0ci of all Amcri
Sen. Carl Francis. R.Dayton, said :cans , join wilh aM fajr ninkjn(,
Monday that Slate Labor Commis- j Amcrjcans jn commending vou on
sionf r Norman 0. Nilsen gave ynlr fnurapC and- enterprise."
him the impression in 1958 that S0.ke was awarded Uc il m
Mark M. Infante was being fired. prZe Mondav .or his forceful
but then Nilsen didn't do it. j editorials calling public attention
Francis and Nilsen - among I lo ,ho activjljM of . scmisecret
others-have been feuding in re- nr(,anMjon mown as rjle jh
cent weeks over the hiring of In-! Birt-h Society."
fante in 1M7 as an inspector of , He , jn commenting on the
migrant worker conditions in Nil-1 aan):
sen's department. Infante riled up j .., am highly gratified to he
a number of Oregon farmers and I aw arflrd one of'the highest honors
left the labor bureau in 1!W0. I in jnrnaism. What I and the
It has since been determined xps.press did is only what any
that Infante had a police record. I nunarr would hav e done
although Nilsen and the Oregon ,11cj0r- die same circumstances."
Civil Service Commission inai
History choice
cated Ihry didn't know this when
he was hired. Nilsen said Infante
left lor a eener paying jnn. i ne . .
Orr ;on Farm Bureau ays lniante i C rl8CT6(3
was fired-and properly so. .
In a letter lo Nilsen released' NEW YORK 'ITI' Columbia
today. Francis Mid "Have you j I'nuersitv Trustees for the first
forgotten our meeting in my of. ; time in history rejected a choice
fice "hirh we hd. at which time of the PulMter Prize Advisory
I related I" vou the disturbing Committee MorOy
information I hd about Infante? The trustees declined t-ocne an
I reallv believed after wj left my i aard to "Citizen Hearst." WA
office that vou were leaving to ! Sanbrrg' biography of the late
discharge him " j publisher William Randolph
Franns said the "disturbing in-; Hearst,
formation" involved some Mexi-j The advisnrv crmrn"'L had
can migrant workeis who got m-; voted for Snberg t book.1 was
to trouble with the law in Western learned, but the university trust-fir(,-on
an are? where Infante ees announ'-ed they "derided to
8s'operating "Whether these m- make no biography auard This is
div idual were victims of InfanVs the onlv explanation to be made
machinations is perriP moot at now. pendirg notification of the
this time." Francu Mid. 'advisory boaid members."
NEW YORK (t'pn - The
mother of astronaut John Glenn
was named World Mother of 1962
today and a Fort Payne, Ala.,
housewife and literacy teacher
was named American Mother of
12.
The American Mothers Com
mittee gave Mrs. Clara Sproat
Glenn, 65, New Concord, Ohio, an
extraordinary award in recogni
tion of Uie hometraining, guid
ance and love she provided her
hero son. Mrs. Glenn previously
had been named Ohio Mother of
1962 and was one of 50 state
mothers attending the com
mittee's annual pre-Motlier's Day
convention at the Waldorf-Astoria
Hotel.
The committee gave its regular
American mother award to Mrs.
Mary Celesta Weathorly. 70, who
was the Alabama Mother of 1962.
Mrs. Weatherly, mother of three
and grandmother of seven, was
cited for her work among
illiterates and semiliterales in De
kalb County. Alabama, where she
has been active in many commu-
i nity and volunteer welfare activi-
lies.
The awards were announced lo
, day by Mrs. Daniel A. Poling,
' president of the committee, who
said Mrs. Glenn's influence on
iici son nau iicicj iimnc nun a
symbol of inner spiritual security,
of courage and manliness for all
mankind to admire and emulate."
Mrs. Glenn was the mother of
three, but Inst two of her chil
dren at birth. She and her hus
band, who was with her when
she was named American mother,
adopted a daughter, who is now
Mrs. Jean Pinkston, a widow,
Cambridge. Ohio. Mrs. Glenn has
three grandchildren.
Ice Harbor Dam
dedication set
PASCO, Wash. (UPD Vice
President Lyndon Johnson will
throw a switch setting two 90.000
kilowatt generators in motion to
add power to the Northwest pool
Wednesday when he dedicates Ice
Harbor Dam.
First commercial power from
the $122 million project was pro
duced in March.
Johnson, fcaUired speaker for
the dedication Wednesday after
noon, heads a host of dignilanes
slated lo attend tho ceremonies.
Also scheduled to be on hand
are governors Albert D. Rosellini
of Washington. Mark Hatfield of
Oregon and Robert Smylie of Ida
ho. Sens. Warren Mauniison and
Henry Jackson, both t) - Wash.,
and Frank Church. D-Idaho; Hep
Gracie I'fost. I) Idaho; Interior
Secretary Stewart Udall and Bon
neville power Administrator
Chailns Luce.
Besides three generators capa
ble of producing 270.000 kilowatts
(three more w4l b installed later
doubling that figure) and its nav
igation look, the 2.7nafoot dam
hss fish to'yrs to allow spring
run of Mlmon and streliiead to
move upstream to spawn.
i Johnson is scheduled to griv
here from Washington. DC.. I
' plane before noon ann will speak
! at a luncheon heie before going
to Uie d.'imtite for Uie i pin
! dedication ceremonies.
women were drifting down the
Southern California coast Monday
aboard the loO.OOO raft Lehi V on
the first leg of an 18.000 mile,
five-year voyage around the
world.
The 20-by-40-fnot raft was towed
to sea from King Harbor here
Saturday and set adrift in the
Japanese Current. The first stop
was scheduled to be San Diego.
Calif., some 12o miles south of
here.
The head of the expedition is
Cant. De Vere Baker. 46, who
said the purpose of die voyage
was to attempt to trace an an
cient Jewish tribe believed to
have settled in Central America
some 2.000 years ago after chitt
ing from Israel on rafts borne by
ocean currents.
Baker, a Mormon Elder, said
the Lehi V would go through the
Panama Canal, drift to New York
City, and then go across Uie At
lantic to Europe. It w ill pass
through the Suez Canal before ar
riving at a point in Hie Persian
Gulf where it will trace tho voy-
I age of the ancient Jewish tribe
I through the Indian Ocoan, China
I Sea and Pacific Ocean.
Also aboard the raft are Baker's
j wife, Nona. 43, and raft captain
I Joseph Seafern, 63, and his wife;
first mate Donald McFarland,
bacteriologist Donald Johnson, 48;
Seaman George Naoni and the
Baker's son-in-law, Ed Halfaere,
26, a Long Beach Stale College
student.
MEETS WITH NEWSMEN
WASHINGTON UP1 - Presi
dent Kennedy will hold a news
conference at 4 pm., EDT,
Wednesday. The White House said
it would be available for live tele
vision and radio coverage if the
networks desired.
NONPARTISAN BALLOT
SAMPLE JUDICIARY BALLOT
FOR
Bend Prtcinct No. 1
DscbatM Comfy, Orgoa
At the Primary Nominating Election to be held m Friday, the lSth day of May, 19(2
Flace a Cross (X) or Check ( ) insido the iquare between the number and name of each candidate
rated for
FOR JUDGE OF TIIE SUPREME COURT Position No. 6.
Vote for One
30
ARXO II. DEXECKE. "Maintain integrity in our Supreme Court. Elect Judge Denecke.'
31 I I LYLE R. WOLFF. "Continue justice under law. Elect Baker County's experienced Circuit
JudRe-
FOR JUDGE OF THE OREGON TAX COURT.
Vote for On
32
PETER CUNNAR. "Incumbent
33 Q RAYMOND L. JONES.
Shop and Save wiih Bend Bulletin Classified Bargaini
SAMPLE BALLOT
NEEDS MOUSETRAP
MCCOOK. Neb it PI I Radio
slate KWFV v. as off the air for
tun hoirs Monday beau-e of a
. ihort circuit 'hat revul'ed when
i a mma-e w as pursued i) its
BojKof Me.
STUI
To Be Torn Off By The Chairman
OFFICIAL PRIMARY NOMINATING BALLOT
FOR THE REPUBLICAN PARTY FOR
Bend Precinct No. 1
Deschutes County, Oregon
At The Primary Nominating Election To Be HeW On Friday, The 18rh Day Of May, lt2
Place a Cross (X) or Check () inside the square between the number end name of each candidate voted for
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES FOR NOMINATION FOR OFFICES OF SENATOR AND REPRESENTATIVE IN
CONGRESS, AND FOR STATE. DISTRICT AND COUNTY OFFICES.
FEDERAL
FOB UNITED STATES SENATOR
VOTE FOR ONI
CLENN E. BR1XET.
retlisbc defenief."
"End red Ink, red Up, red threats; ntk
M
R. F. COOK. "A Cold w tor Conmmtiva.
IS I I EDWIN R. DURNO. "Everthln ded for oVfeme; elMwhcre,
I I r Feder ipending; leu Federal dictation."
1 f 1 HAROLD M. LIVINGSTON. "Whirl, Republic on wta Nor-
I I
embor? Dr. Livingston, I premm.'"
SIC UNANUER. "Xen Ullc - mora work' for better too tad
buiineu opportunities in Oregon."
11 I I J. BACALOFF. "Largo corporitionf miut bo respooublo ud obor
I I Federal monopoly and tecuriuei laws."
17
FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS. SECOND CONCRISSIONAL
DISTRICT. Baler, Crook, DuchotM, CilUaa, Great, Raraer, Hood
Ri.er, Jeffenon, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Iboraaoa, Umatilla,
Uoion, Wallowa, Waico and Wheeler Conoboa, VOTE FOl ONK
II I EVERETT J. THOREN. "Will effectively cooperate for Coaottrettaol
i I fovornment and tho mtoratioa mt Individ ol freedom."
II I lOBERTw. CHANDLER. "Eip.rie.ooj pbuo aiiaW . . ,
' ' getic. Informed, bowct
STATE
FOR GOVERNOR
VOTE FOR ONE
"J3
MARK HATFIELD. "A working Covemor, a leasoned, trotted ad
ministiator who practice good clean government."
C. ALTVATER. "Oppoaed la tka rtealiag of water from river
bulna of Oregon,"
FOR COMMISSIONER OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR VOTE FOR ONE
ft I I ALFRED (PAT) BLAIR. "Make thia a rpartroet of Labor tad
I I Industry as it should be."
OB STATE REPRESENTATIVE, TWE NTT-FIRST REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT. n Crook, Deschutes and rllmoa Covntiea. VOTE FOR ONE
O r KESSLER RJCHARJ1 CANNON. Narrv Oregooian, vetaraa. U
I I yean reaidenos la the district, eipenenad leguUtot."
FOR DI.STX1CT ATTORNEY. TWhiitea Cewafr. VOTE FOR ONE
U f 1 LOUIS L. IELKEN.
COUNT!
FOR COUNTT COMMISSIONE1
VOTE FOR ONE
15 I I CEORCE F. BAKER. If re aWetaJ wfll roatum to work for boat
I I inlaraot of oatiro Coaaty."
FOR COUNTT CLERK.
VOTE FOl Off!
FOR COUNTT TREASURER.
TOTE FOR 01
FOR COUNTT ASSESSOR.
VOTE FOl Off!
PRECINCT
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATEJ FOR ELECTION OF FRECINCT
COMMrTTEEMEN,
FOR REPUBLICAN PRECINCT COMMrTTEEMAN
VOTE FOR ONI
rpRECTNCf bbUtirfTftWFZliI 6tf FOl ONI
I transmitter by a snake.
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