The Bend bulletin. (Bend, Deschutes County, Or.) 1917-1963, May 20, 1955, Page 4, Image 4

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THE BEND BULLETIN
and CENTRAL OREGON PRESS
An Independent Newspaper
Robert Wk Chandler, Editor and Publisher
Phil F. Slogan, Anoolate Editor
Member, Audit Bureau of Circulations
Balm m tumid 01m Hattar, January . 1" M tfc Poat Offlea at Baa4 Ota
mnda ait at Mana a, I
The Bend Bulletin, Friday. May 20. 1955
-'TAe Indian Fighter"
In the next five weeks there will be plenty of action
along "the bend in the river", where the Deschutes makes
a wide swing before churning into white water at Ben
jiam Falls. ' .
- Much of the action in connection with the 'produc
. "Jion of "The Indian Fighter", a western film in color,
'"will center in that area, where an old land mass juts
Eastward to push the turbulent Deschutes into the jagged
llava fields.
' ' Mountain backgrounds, grassy meadows, plenty of
. greenery and the curving, giant bend in the' river will
tend themselves nicely to the magic cinemascope lens.
Possibly the only element missing for the production
' of a western picture in the area will be a story that In-
dlana and pioneer settlers actually met in a grim battle
in the area.
Yet in this very locale where "The Indian jFighter"
will be filmed proof was recently found that Indians
".long ago made camp. That proof was a stone "dish", in
-which redmen ground roots and seeds into flour.
V' Pioneers knew of old Indian trails near Benham
falls, and told of tepee poles near pools in the river where
big trout lurked in earlier years. Possibly nomadic des
sert tribes and fishermen from the Columbia met near
Benham falls long ago and battled for the trout-filled
pools!
' ' More than a century ago, a pathfinder whose name
ms found blazed in frontier history passed that way. He
' was Captain John C. Fremont, who visited the region in
'1843. . .
Soldiers from Camp Polk possibly visited the Ben
. h'am Falls area in their brief stay on Squaw creek, in the
Sisters country in the winter of 1865-66. There is no in
dication they encountered Indians in the area, but cer
tainly they found Indian trails.
P Some of the "shooting" will bo in the Smith Rocks
' Area, where jagged pinnacles loom above the gorge of
. Crooked river. There js a legend that Indians and whites
! battled in the shadow of the rocks, but history fails to
; back the legend. Old timers said that a soldier from Camp
i Polk fell to his death from one of the "hoodoo" rocks. His
' name was Smith.
Through diligent research, we've tried our best to
" 4'g up some history that would provide a background for
the western movie that is to be filmed on the Deschutes.
:" But we've failed.
But in years to come, and possibly when other films
, are made on the Deschutes, we can point westward to the
. Benham falls area and tell our friends:
"There is the location where 'The Indian Fighter'
' was filmed."
in ,
'Ave Tgit Out 'n' Push, Guv'norNo Gas'
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. rri nnn m
JUL I JLI
U UL. I H LE
f GENERAL -.J-H flFa a '
NEA Strvict, Inc '
New Products Aimed at Milking Life Easier
i
$udden Summers
I , The office weather prognosticntor says he can make
J the following prediction without belittling his prestige:
; Late springs in Central Oregon are followed by
sudden summers." t
J This year, winter lingered through April and lowered
Jthe mean temperature to the lowest mark in more than
;half a century. Up to mid-May, the unseasonable weather
continued.
One of those days the mercury will expand into the
; lower eighties, and summer will bo here.
I When this occurs it will be. well for Central Orc-
Jgonians to remember these facts:
. Persons irrigating their lawns must do so on alter-
Innte days, a regulation already in "effect this year.
No trash must be burned without a special permit
, from the fire department.
J And it would bo well to remember that the Deschutes
; river through the years has proved inviting to early
isummer swimmers and occasionally has taken its toll
in life.
English to Draft
3 Ordinances
The city commission instructed
City Attorney Harry A. English to
draw up three ordinances affecting
television facilities, roving sales
men, and garbage disposu! Wed
nesday night.
The Bend TV Cable Inc. made
a format applicauon that a tran
chise be granted so that work to
build a cable bringing television
into the city could be started.
The city has been getting televi
sion via air transmission.
The commission gave initial ap
proval for a new garbage dis
posal service . company, which
plans to employ covered garbage
vans in a year. An ordinance to
require covered trucks for gar
bage traffic was ordered to be
drafted. These measures aro ex
pected to press the present two
garbage companies to replace
their open trucks,
An ordinance to license visiting
salesmen was initiated because
commissioners feel that the sales
men and companies operating on
such practice should contribute to
Hie city. They are now not sub
ject to any form of taxation by
the cily.
City Attorney English Indicated
Edson in Washington
Many Are Skeptical of Treaty
By PETER EDSON
NEA Washington Correspondent
WASHINGTON (NEA)
Signing Of an Austrian peace trea
ty after nine years of nerve-wracking
negotiation with the Commu
nists marks the first time that
Russian troops have withdrawn to
wards Moscow since they agreed
to get out of northern Iran in 1943.
According to the text of the Ro
manian and Hungarian peace tre
aties of 1947, the Russians agreed
to withdraw their troops from
those two countries ufter the Aus
trian treaty is signed.
This would mark a further So
viet withdrawal if lived up to.
But the Hungarian and Roman
ian treaties have been violated in
many other ways. The provision
is regarded as a dead letter.
Russian troops are expected to
stay opposite the Austrian border
even in Hungarian and Roman
ian uniforms for a disguise, if ne
cessary.
Simple facts of life like these
have made many Americans skep
tical ot any good in the Austrian
peace treaty. If the Russians do
move out of their zone of occupa
tion in Austria, pessimists expect
mem to move back in whenever
it suits them after the Ameri
cans, British and French move out.
Dr. Karl Gruher, Austria's Am
bassador to Washington . and her
former foreign minister, has been
that such ordinance is possible it having his difficulties in heating
Union Joins Demand
the visitors do
inter-slate trade.
not engage
in
; Because of some serious abuses in union welfare
;fund handling, confined to a minority of American trade
unions, the national AFL and CIO organizations have
joined in proposing that Congress enact a law providing
'i for compulsory government examination of such funds.
This is a complete reversal of union position on laws
affecting conduct of internal union affairs. Some such af-
fairs were regulated by tho Taft-Hartley act of several
1 years ago, and such regulation was bitterly fought by the
labor organizations and their leaders.
": .Tho. scandal situation got started several years ago.
I A noted, it has been confined to a relatively few unions,
but the practices followed have been reprehensible.
- . Among some of them are:
Use of union welfare and pension funds to set up
businesses in competition with employers with whom a
'union is having a jurisdictonal or organizational fight;
mcKoacKs to union oi urn's oy insurance companies
on welfare fund business;
Excessive salaries to union officers and their friend
and relatives for nominal duties in handling welfare fund
activities; and
Other forms of financial skulduggery involving il
legal transferral of funds to crooked union officials.
Such arrangements do no good for anyone except
ing" a few crooks. The national organizations are wise in
-asking help in curbing them.
New Industry
Plans Detailed
At Meeting
Only ten local residents attended
the meeting called by the indus
trial committee ot the Bend Cham
ber of Commerce Wednesday lo ac
quaint the cily wilh the Don Ber
ry. Inc., a firm thai product's car
tup carriers and relae'd sports
equipment which will locale here
as soon as a building can be con
structed.
Don Berry of the California firm
was hero lo confer wilh local resi
dents, and estimated that when his
plant is in full production it will
liavo a payroll of from -." to 30
persons, all to be hired locally.
The building, 40 by !HI feel, will
le erected in Enterprise Acres, at
the weslern city limits of Bend
ami adjacent to the Cascade Uikes
Highway. Berry will lease and
buy the building over a 10-year
period, according to plans.
As Berry p'.ans lo be here on
June I. Owen Panner. chamber
.'resident, stressed the need for
full and prompt city-wide conpern
lion In order lo raise the amount
required to erect the plant. Esti
mates by local contractors indicate
the building will cost $i:.0UO
Shares ill the corporal inn will be
old Ibis nct week, the chamber
pi evident said.
A substantial amount has al
i-eady Ixvn subscribed, it was an
nounced at last night' meeting.
"Bend Is particularly fortunate
n securing this industry." Panner
said. Both Spokane, Wash., and
Klamath Falls tried lo interest
Berry In locating in those cities.
down speculative conclusions i.f
this sort.
To him and tp all Austrians. ap
parently, the new treaty is won
derful. It awards Austria her free
dom for Ihe first time since the
Nazis took over in World War 11.
Austria offers no easy road for
possible Russian attack on eith
er Germany or Italy, says Grubcr.
I he Russians don t like to fiuht in
the mountains. The Austriiu.s
make good soldiers and they have
fought the Russians for centuries.
They would do it again if neces
sary.
Limitations on the size of the
Austrian army and its air force
have boon dropped out of the Ireu-
y ilrall.
Two limitations on Austria arc
not in Ihe treaty hut in a separate
agreement between Austrian Chan
I'ellor Julius Raab and Russian
foreign Commisar V. M. Mololov.
They would ban any foreign mili
tary bases on Austrian soil and
prevent Austria from joining any
military alliances. The Austrian
Parliament Is expected to make
policy declarations to this effect.
they present a major hazard.
These commitments would keep
Austria out of NATO the North
American Treaty Organization. If
the Austrians think, however, thBt
they can be assured of any west
srn guarantees of independence,
for free, they may be mistaken.
Austria's northeastern frontier is
a deep thumb stuck into Czecho
slovakia and Hungary. It would
take a long supply line, to support
Austria if attacked. It would add
greatly to NATO's problems if Aus
tria had to be included in defense
plans. The easy solution would be 1
lo let Austria go and try to savej
Germany.
The Austrians insist that they
will not become passive neutrals.
They are definitely anti - Commu
nist in their record, their govern
ment and their natural interests.
Austria's main trade ties are
with the west. Ove 40 per cent j
ot Austria's trade was with east
ern Europe before the war. It is
now only nine per cent. Eastern
Europe no longer has surplus
grain to trade.
As to why tho Russians have
chosen this particular time to
make peace, tho Austrians pro
fess to be as baffled as every
one else.
If it Is bait for a reunited and
disarmed Germany, the Austrian?:,
who know the Germans, thiiw
Germany won't be Tooled.
One speculative answer is tint
the Russians realize they are over
extended. Wanting quiet on their
western front while the situation
in the Orient is so tense, the So
viet may be anxious to make deals
wherever it can in Europe.
Certainly. If Ihe Austrian treaty
is signed before n possible Big
Four Conference of heads of gov
ernment is held this summer, the
Russian bargaining position will be
greatly reduced.
By ELIZABETH TOO.WEY
United Press Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK (UP) New prod
ucts and novel ideas to make life
happier are bustin' out all over
this spring.
They've opened a hair reviving
center for men here and somebody
announced a new window flower
box that won't warp, crack or peel.
A household spray just out (by
the way,, there is no connection
Detween any oi inese develop
ments, so far as this writer knows)
is said to retard soil on the furn
ishings, and a foundation garment
company is making girdles and
brassieres that somehow have ' a
secret sanitizing process" built in.
Brides can trade in the old fam
ily silver to apply on ti,e payments
for a new set, and little boys just
got a go ahead to play with dolls
from a psychologist hired by a
toy company.
Busy Whiter
All in all, there are signs that
this past winter was a busy one.
Women soon will be able to buy
a new eye makeup reported to
impart "the gentle-eyed kitten-of-the-Nile
look." And the convention
of cosmetic chemists holds a panel
discussion tomorrow on wrinkles
so anything could happen before
another winter.
While wives adopt the kitten-of-the-Nile
look, husbands may just
possibly come home with a cat-whc-swallowed-canary
expression
if this hair revival spreads. They
turn a man's hair back to its boy
ish shade, or as they tell the timid
ones at the new Gourelli Men's
Hair Center, they "work the natur
al color back into graying hair
with such skill and discretion that
years disappear without telling
how."
Women don't like to tell how,
either.
Flower Box
That new flower box is made of
a combination of things, such as
shades for second story garden- Dr. Harold Mlchal-Sroith. a psy.
ers.
The household soil retarder is a
new chemical developed by Ru
Pont researchers to coat every
thing from lamp shades to slip
covers. The invisible surfacing
makes surfaces resist soil instead
of absorbing it.
As for the innovation In founda
tion garments, well, a man named
Jess Eisen, vice president of the
Model Bra Co., says his new
"daisy-fresh" girdles and bras
sieres "prevent- perspiration odors
by destroying bacteria."
The idea of trading in something
old and Garnished for something
new makes as much sense in the
sterling silver business as tne
automobile business, the Wallace
Silversmiths decided this spring.
So the company is backing a na
tionwide policy among retail stores
which allows a bride who's buying
the company's silver products to
trade in anything she can find in
the silver draw, including the
whole 52-piece set of well-worn s'l-
ver plate.
Boy's Dolls
That announcement about allow
ing little boys to play with dolls,
which came as unexpectedly as a
May snowstorm, gives a parent
something to think about until the
next set of "Dear Santa Claus"
letters.
"Children use toys to imitate
adult life, and since little boys
often see their fathers bathing and
feeding the baby, doll play has a
very natural place in their lives,"
chologist just hired as consultant
in child play activities by the Ideal
Toy Corp., said. II the boys
friends poke fun at him, Dr. Mich-al-Smith
advised a parent to, "tell
your child that just because some
boys don t play witn oous is no
reason whyjie shouldn't"
KNOWS HIM WELL
JOPL1N, Mo. (UP) Mrs. Luther
Richardson of Texarkana, Ark.
knows her husband very well.
She mailed a postcard to the
Joplin Police Department ad
dressed to her husband at the jail.
The card read: "If not delivered
within 60 days, return to Mrs.
Richardson."
I have 1hc RIGHT I
Answer toryou!
Insure With FARMERS
A Savings
Stl-Aaal Prtnlasu
No "cp cbaraV' far mlltaj. '
or bsiintii
Prompt Claims Strvlca. Your; :
local District Aqont It otk.
orliid to handle claims at
too at reported. TKIi tllm
iiiatos rod-tapt aid dtlay. !
For ralsi, call or in
F. Keith Shepard
DISTRICT AGENT '
W Oregon Ave. Phone S31
LOCAL AGENTS
HELMEB W ALLAN
Bend
Phone 1548-M or SSt
JOY HUGHBANKS
Trallways Depot
Redmond, Phone 478
Wednesday, Richardson was ar-
glass fibers and plastic, in pastel ' rested for intoxication.
Umatilla Police
Chief Selected
UMATILLA. Ore. (UP) James
Roherts. Pilot Rock, Ore., has
been named police chief of this
eastern Oregon town, which was
without a peace officer for two
days.
Koncrts, namea by city com
missioners yesterday, replaces
Hugh Little, who resigned Tues
day, according to cily officials. Lit
tle has maintained he was ousted
SAVE $5
On I.t'ntll tial
i:rtn Sl.lv ld II
llrt 8lk l-rt lit
I'hnnt It7
BKOOlUMiS M OOD Y.YRD
Watch ! Wait
For Our
Anniversary Sale
See Next Tuesday's Bulletin
Fawn & Ray
Williams Tire Service
lioodyear Tire Uistrihubirs for CmiIitU Oregon
183 K. flreriiwoml rtnm tH
Cap the ceremonies with a gift of
Streamlite
Samsonite Luggage
1
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more clothes in less space... and keep them wrinkle-free!
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