The Bend bulletin. (Bend, Deschutes County, Or.) 1917-1963, May 04, 1955, Page 9, Image 9

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    THE BEND BULLETIN
Bend, Deschutes County. Oregon. Wednesday. May 4. 1955
fwiryr. m . - ir"' ft : i. t . r 1
Ii .1 u
DRECHORN CASTLE'S LAST STAND Thev hnd to wait till the ramparts were unmanned
to "get" old Dreghorn Castle in Edinburgh. Scotland. After withstanding many attacks and sieges
through the centuries, the Dreghorn battlements finally succumbed to an order of the War De
partment Here a paratrooper trains his Same thrower on the interior of the famed castle, con
demned because of serious outbreaks of dry rot. It was burned to a shell
U.S. Will Have Variety of Types
Of A-Powered Ships in Ten Years
By CHARLES f ORDDKY
United Press Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON (UP) The U. S.
fleet will boast a "variety of
types" of nuclear-powered war
ships within 10 years.
The Navy, already making
"great progress" with nuclear sub
marines, now is "on the threshold
of developing advanced atomic re
actors for large surface ships."
Adm. Robert B. Carney, chief of
naval operations, made those state
ments today to tlie United Press in
written answers to questions. Ques
tions were submitted following con
gressional criticism that the Navy
was "dragging its feet" in con
verting to nuclear propulsion and
was "a little slow" in developing
new weapons for the Nautilus class
of atomic submarine.
The criticisms came respectively
from Sens. Henry M. Jackson (D
Wash) and Clinton P. Anderson
(D-NMt.
Carney said President Eisenhow
er's plan for a nuclear powered
merchant ship to roam the world
In- peaceful commerce "will also
open the way for the application
of nuclear power to military craft
of comparable size and comparable
speed."
Five Different Reactors
Other Navy officers disclosed
that the Navy now has under de
atomic reactors designed for both
submarines and surface ships.
These officers said the Nautilus
carries "all modem" weapons. But
they refused to comment on wheth
t r they include missiles and atomic
weapons. The Nautilus is under
stood to have six torpedo tubes
which will fire a new type homing
torpedo. However, delivery of this
projectile to the Navy has been
slow.
Carney said there still are
"knotty technical problems" bu) he
was confident "our scientists and
engineers will whip those prob
lems" and bring about nuclear
powered warships.
"Nd specific date can be fixed
for a fleet in which nuclear power
will be commonplace although, in
the submarine field, we are mak
ing great progress now," Carney
said. "I believe that in a decade
from now there will be a variety of
types of ships in'the fleet operating
with nuclear power."
"Threshold of Feasibility"
The Navy, he said, is "on the
threshold of feasibility" with re
gard to nuclear powered ships. He
called such power "one of the great
significant maritime develop
ments" and said "we must pres?
to master it and to harness it."
The Navy's spokesmen did not
identify the five types of atomic
reactor under development.
Jackson, in criticizing alleged
Navy slowness in shifting to atom
ic propulsion, said it was "regret
table" that five conventional sub
marines were sought in the fiscal
1956 budget. The Navy said those
submarines "will not become ob
solete during their normal life
span." It said they were needed i
while nuclear - powered subma
rines are "still in the development
stage."
SINGER
j-SALE OF USED
SEWING MACHINES
r
look at these
dollar-stretching buys
Treadles $ 9.95
Portables $29.50
Consoles $32.50
IASY BUDGET TERMS
SINGER
SEWING CENTER
Prineville
831 Wall
Phone 5712
Phone 1825
Cool Off at
Police Station
IRONTON. ?. (UP) A mid
i dleaged couple walked into the po
lice station here at 3 a.m. with
an unusual request.
"Officer, we're married and just
returning home from a party." the
man said. "We're In the middle
of a family fuss. Would you mind
If we stayed here a few minutes
so we won't get into real trouble?"
Desk Officer, Homer Fugett was
delighted to have company. He
gave the couple cigarettes and
comfortable chairs. For 30 min
utes not a word was said, the si
lence broken only by the chatter
of the police radio.
"George, honey, I'm all right
now," the wtiman finally said.
"Let's go home."
"Sure, Baby, let's go," the man
said. Glancing at the officer, he
added:
"Thanks a lot. We're rolling
along now. Everything is okay."
ThTtiot Most
Avid Golfer
Of Presidents
NEW YORK (UP) Some of
Pres. Eisenhower's predecessors
have played golf more avidly than
he does, Merriman Smith, United
Press White House reporter, said
Monday.
Smith, speaking to un annual
spring dinner of the Society of the
Silurians, said the President had
been "blasted and pilloried" by
his critics on the subject of his
pastime.
"I felt some of this criticism
was quite unwarranted," Smith
said. So,. Smith, said, he did some
research.
"Both Mr. Wilson and Mr. Hard
ing played much more golf than
Mr. Eisenhower ever has," Smith
said.
lie said Mr. Wilson played golf
three to five times a week, while
Mr. Eisenhower rarely plays more
thanpnee a week while in Washington.
He said research showed that
Mr. Wilson played golf in three
inch snow one Christmas morning
before breakfast. While House
aides painted Wilson's golf balls
Willi iodine to keep the chief ex
ecutive from losing them.
Smith said Mr. Harding was
probably the biggest "money golf
er" the White House has ever
seen. He said Mr. Harding played
$500 Nassau pool games fairly
regularly.
The Silurians is an organization
whose members were New York
newspapermen Z: years ago
more.
Anybody Wanl
To Purchase
A I inhthniKP?
SEE ALL THIS ON YOUR WAY
Inca Civilization
Being Traced
BERKELEY. Calif. (UP) -A
team of University of California
archeologists has traced the ori
gins of Hie ancient civilization
of the Incas to the mountains of
southern Peru.
The expedition's leader, John H.
Rowe. associate professor of an
thropology, said his pariy found
sites south and west of Cuzeo, Peru
w hich "carry us back nearly to the
beginnings of farming and settled
village life in the area."
Rowe said discoveries in the
area established the difference be
tween Peruvian and Bolivian var
ieties of Tiahuanaco culture, the
granddaddy of the Inca civi
lization. By tracing the distribution of the
two varieties Rowe said his group
had determined that it was the
Peruvian and not the Bolivian
style that was the direct ancestor
of Inca art.
By II ARM AN W. MCHOLS I
I'nited Press Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON (UP) Interest
ed in a cozy little summer place?
Your uncle Sam has some for
sale surplus lighthouses, 16 of
them, located along the Atlantic
Coast.
The General Services Adminis
tration here is handling the sales,
and wouldn't be surprised if the
current offering was gobbled up us
fast as 17 others that were put on
the block in the last five years.
Inflation has hit the lighthouse
market. For example, the light
station at Wings Neck, Cape Cod,
was built in 1849 fur 3215. It has
been done over a number of times
since, and the going-rate today is
$13,738.
It Was Quite A Life !
Much has been written about the
old keepers of lighthouses. Some of
the glimmers were a mile out to
sea. When summer was around the
keeper could row home for a week
end, if he. had an assistant. But in
the chill of winter, he packed a big
lunch, oared out in his dingy and
for the next few months saw more
of the waves than he did of his
wife. Sure, he could wig-wag his
missus a message, but Unit wasn't
as good as kissing her behind the
ear at Yuletide.
Worse, the life of the keeper was
here today and maybe gone tomor
row. Take the plight of one John
W. B. Thompson, assistant keeper
of the Cape Florida lighthouse in
1836.
The incident occurred on July 23
during the Seminole War. After it
was all over, according to files in
the Coast Guard headquarters,
Thompson made out his official re
port. The Cape Florida house was
practically on shore. He looked out
the kitchen window and saw a
band of Indians approaching, mus
kets and bows and arrows at the
ready Thomson and his helper
ran to bolt the door of the light
house. The Indians Attack
"I had the key in the inside
lock," the keeper said, "when an
Indian had his hand on the outside
latch."
There followed many arrows and
even more musket balls. All
Thompson and his man had were
three muskets. They fired two of
them until they were hot and then
picked up the spare.
The. helper finally was done in
and the keeper was wounded
several places." The Indians fired,
by accident,' into tin tanks of oil,
225 gallons of it, and soon the in
side of the lighthouse was an in
ferno. Finally Thompson made it
to the top of the lighthouse and to
escape cremation climbed out on a
two-foot ledge.
"I recommended my soul to
God." the keeper wrote in his re
port. "I thought of jumping to the
rocks below, but decided not to.
The Indians thought him dead,
went about plundering and stealing
everything they could lay a hand
on. Then the Redmcn went away
The keeper cut off one. leg of his
pants and waved for help. Help
finally came, and Thompson lived
to tend another light.
l; o A
MsMxLiJM - a. M,
vVt
GREAT LAKES
tMmH
tc'r,tt
.Travel the ever-fascinating Banff route
lEast on The Canadian, Canadian Paci8c'
' new Scenic Dome Streamliner.
Go one way Canadian Pacific, one way
United States lines. Inquire about Family
Fare Plan. See your travel agent or
Canadian Pacific, 207 American Bank
Vuildiag, Portland, BRoadway 2044.
THE BANFF ROUTE EAST
'ft
The Canadian Canada's first and
only Scenic Dome Streamliner
and the world's longost Dome ride,
2.881 miles. All stainless steel, and .
all Diesel power for a smoother, ;
quieter ride. Superb cosch, tourist
and first class with mora lounge
space than ever before. Canadian
"art gallery" decor, with original
murals, etchings, carvings, rare
woods. AU (his at no sitrs far-
Last GAR Man
Gets Honors
DULUTH. Minn. (UP)
Minnesota is knocking itself out
this year to honor Albert Woolson,
its number one senior citizen.
State and national attention is
nothing new to Woolson but now,
as the last known surviving mem
ber of the Union Army of the Civil
War, he's getting more of it than
ever. He recently marked his
108th birthday and congratulatory
cards poured in from all over the
country.
Duluth had a special celebra
tion. A bust of Woolson was un
veiled in ceremonies at City Hall
Gov. Orville L. Freeman wired
congratulations.
The legislature didn't overlook
the occasion. The Senate passed a
happy birthday resolution. House
members offered congratulations
in a concurrent resolution and
asked the governor to give the old
campaigner the Minnesota Service
Medal.
The secretary of state announced
that the l!)j5 Minnesota legislate
manual or "bluebook" would car
ry a picture and biography of the
last of the "boys in blue.
QI'lfK KKTCKX
OMAHA, Neb. (UPl - Three
dogs taken by an apparent dog
lover were returned inside of 21
hours when Humane Society of
ficers who had been keeping them
announced the animals were un
der observation for rabies.
CURTAIN COINC UP! On the fancy framework beneath Topsy
Kuoppers' skirt, that is. The lovely singer was standing back
stage in Munich, Germany, waiting for her cue In a new operetta,
when she was caught by surprise by a ventilator that had jusf
been switched on.
Club Hears Talk On Conservation
Slow to adopt a program of con
servation, the United States, after
a century and a half of exploita
tion of its natural resources, is
now husbanding them with increas
ing effectiveness, Robert W. Chan
dler, Bend Bulletin publisher, told
Kiwams club audience nt the
Pine Tavern Monday noon.
In Scandinavia, Finland and
Germany, the possiblities of forest
conservation insuring a continu
ing asset instead of downright de
pletionhave been shown, Chan
dler observed, and are beginning
to be sought in this country. But
arid wastes in North Africa and
the Middle East demonstrate the
far-reaching effects of failure to
follow similar principles.
In the great plains area of the
United States the job of soil ero
sion control, done in the depres
sion period, must now be repeated
because of a second world war,
which, like the first, stimulated
marginal land cultivation. Chan
dler suid.
Fish and game resources are be
ing better handled after a trial and
error period, but water, the great
est natural resource of all, ii
coining to be In critical supply in
areas that once enjoyed abund
anee, he emphasized.
Ben W. Fanning presided at the
luncheon meeting and introduced
the speaker. v
HE'S A HER0-"G.I. Joe-
an Army pigeon stationed at
Fort Monmouth, N, J., has been
awarded a service citation as
an "outstanding hero of World
War II." The pigeon saved 1000
British troops from possible an
nihilation at Colvin, Italy, by
flying a message to them warn
ing of an impending bombing. -
Washington's
Funeral Detailed
In Old Paper
BRA1NTREE, Mass. (UP)
A time yellowed copy of a 155
year ' old newspaper containing a
detailed account of George Wash
ington g funeral has been discov
ered here.
Charles K. Remlck, a retired
railroad conductor, found the pa
per along with a diary belonging
to his great - grandfather. The
paper, printed in Kingston, Ulster
County, N. Y., was a tabloid sizo
four - page edition dated Jan. 4,
1800.
The final paragraph of the long
funeral story read:
The unclouded brightness of his
Glory . will illuminate the future
ages."
KNAPP
AEROTRED SHOES
FOR COMFORT
Phone 1084 W
1251 Jacksonville
More Listening
Than Talking
RACINE, Wis. (UP) Ra
cine's "Miss Voice," has joined the
WAF and is in basic training at
Lackland Air Force Base in San
Antonio, Tex., where she'll do
more listening than talking. Miss
Dorla P.,, Grauwels, 18, was se
lected in January as "Miss
Voice," while working as a long
distance operator for the Wiscon
sin Telephone Company.
SHOP
FOR
YOUR
LOAN!
Why pay more when you can borrow $500'"
and repay only $26.44 per month
at Portland Loan.
Up To 24 Months To Pay!
Borrow $1000 Repay $52.88 mo.
Borrow $ 750 Repay $39.65 mo.
Borrow $ 400 Repay $21.15 mo.
WHY PAY MORE?
PORTLAND LOAN CO.
88 Oregon Avenue
Phone 173
Loans above $300 made by
Portland Industrial Loan Co. of Bend
Under the Industrial Loan Companies Act
One Way to Find Out
What The Shouting's All About ...
j Drive It Yourself !
' J&
i hit ffr'i irn Trfirw'rrT
Svpw "6t" Hoiidoj Coup. A General Mofori Vofet.
$ 2564 42
OlMMMILf "IT t-DOOW SEDAN flLlli.
TftATCO AT ftlOHTI DC 1 1 VCR ID L OCA Li. Ti
TATK AND LOCAL TAXU EXT HA.
Your or1 dpndi upon choke
0 modal and nod optional
eq-fipntcflt and oec !. Prk
mo v vary it'OhMy tn odtotning
comnwnitif becaui ot lrMppmg
Chargt. All prieni twbcl to
change wlrnowt notice.
Clearly, it, an OMamnbile yrar! Sal are rocketing.
People everywhere are talking . . . and huyinf Olds at never
before. We'd like to show you why. First, a ft-w uiimit in
our thowroom . . . then a i w more on the mad. You'll meet
the ultra-flmart and excitative "(ju-Ahrad" look -it's a
fashion leader inaide and out. Then cmiira your introduction
to that terrific high-cnmpreiwion power tram . . . the
"Rocket" Kngine and Ilydra-.Motic Super Drive. To top
it all, we'll show you a low price that rail for ai-tion. Come
in soon for your "Koiket Hide" . . . you'll join the shouting
when you dol You'll make Oldnmohile your car for '551
ttptianal Qtttrrn cow.
OLDSMOB1LE
Con You Sm, Stttr, Stop Safafyf Greek Your Cor Chtclr Atcidtnltt
OO AHIAD . . . MIVI IT YOURSim THI OOINO'I OHM IN A 'OCKIT l"l
ELECTROLUX
Authorized
Cleaner Sales & Service
PHIL PHILBROOK
I1M R. TMrS
Brfbterea C.S.
Photl. lltS-J
DYERS AUTO SERVICE
220 Greenwood Avenue
Phone 87
OONT M1 (I0MUN0 ROMtniO'l HIT MU1ICAI "DHHT SONS", STAIIINQ NI1ION IDDY SATUIDAV, MAT 7 NIC-TV"