The Bend bulletin. (Bend, Deschutes County, Or.) 1917-1963, November 18, 1921, Page 1, Image 1

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TUB WKATUKH
I'nsoUIod ToulKlit mill Tomorrow.
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THE BEND BULLETIN
DAILY EDITION
VOU V.
1IICND, DKHdIILTKH COL'NTV, OHIXrO.N, FRIDAY AFTKRNOON, NOVKMBKIt 1H, 1021.
No. 140
- JAPAN'S PRESS
NOW OPPOSING
BRITISH PACT
WOULD SUBSTITUTE AN
"UNDERSTANDING"
STRONG STAND TAKEN
Ami'i-li-nil Delegation Preparing Ti
Fight Moillft i-nlloiiH of Hughes
4 I'liiii Hliililllil(lil iif Chinese
Nation In IIi-UInIi Poll.).
Illy United Prru yiTlic llcnd bulletin.)
TOKIO. Nov. IS. Japanese oill
t n r I I xpiKiiHliin today suddenly
turned against (tin renewal of tho
Anglo-Japanuiio ullliuico. Hubatltutlou
of mi Amorlcuu-llilllsh-Jnpaiieso
"understanding" wus suggested as
highly doslrnblii.
t'lUMiK OPIMHF.D
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18. Tha
V'nltod Ktutca In now bumlInK every
nffort to prevont wholesale modifi
cation of th 1 lux lion nuvul holiday
Idea. Ilolh Jupun and KiiKlund ara
preparing (o make Imporiiint pro
pofiiln. TlilH country would consider
mild tnoillf Icntlonn, but not thono al
tering the conipli'ilon or Ilia Hughoa
Idea.
Thli country would not approve of
lliltuln's suggestion of a Joint nnvy
yard for connlriiciion of ships for
both nation. Amur Ira la preparing
more vigorously, howaver, to atom
Japan'a dainanda. '
Tim eastern vmpirii' wanta an in
crease of 10 pur cant In tho allow
ance capital ahlpa, retention, not
acruppiiiK of tliu uliuit butlloshlp
Mutzii and nn Increase In tho tonnuge
of dofi'iiM- ahlpa. which means light
cruisers.
)rti Kehslun Dun Momlny
Great Hrlialn'a policy toward
China In Ihn arina conference favora
atulillltiitliiii of that nation and de
velopment country for the benefit of
both f'hlna ii nd thn outHldc world,
nuil opportunity for thn working out
of (TiIiih'h own ili'Htlny iintrummoleil
by unnocesiiuiy International Inter
ference. Thn third conference plenary sos
almi ore urn at 1 1 o'clock Monday
morning In conlliii'iitiil hull. It was
iiiiiinuiicod today.
ARBUCKLE JURY
IS COMPLETED
COMEDIAN HATIHFIED WITH KK
l.F.CTIOXN, PAHTHTLARLY
WITH WOMEN Wilt) WII.Ii DE
CIDE 11 IH FATE.
( Rr United Prcu to Thi Bend Uutlctln.)
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 18.
Tho Jury for tho trial of Roscoo Ar
bucklo on n chnrgo of manslaughter
lii connection with the death of Vlr
Klnla Rappo wna completed nt 10:20
o'clock this morning whon the 12th
Juror took tho oath.
Attorneys thon started anloctlon of
nn nltornato Juror with the probabll
lty that thny would commonco taking
nvldelice before court adjourned luto
today.
Tho comedlnn exproaand antlsfuc
tlon with tho Jury, nnd la glad worn'
on oro HorvltiK. Ho anya ho wants
feminine vindication. Fatty la In Jo
vial humor and highly plenaod with
tho proceedings thua fnr.
SMALL CARDS CAUSE
POSTOFFICE DELAYS
, Cards amnllor than 2 by 4 Inchon
ahould not bo sent through tho malla,
nrgen roatmaatnr W. II. Hudson,
apropos, of tho expoctod Christmas
rush. As a rulo many small cards and
anvclopos mo m alloc!, cunning con
fitHion for tho ronsnn Hint tho can
celling mark ohlltorntos llio uddroas,
and that they cannot bo run through
the facing tables, necessitating throo
extra handlings.
Cards of this alr.a nltto cause dalny
In cancelling bocan.RO they aro diffi
cult to put through tho cunculling
mnchlila, are difficult to sort . and
may be lost or damaged because thoy
do- not fit lotter packngos and can-
not be tied securely.
Strike Starts,
Armed Rangers
Placed On Duty
(Ilr United I'rnu to Th P.nd Bulletin)
WAI.HICNIH'llO, Colo,, Nov.
18. Two liiiiiilrnd ai'ini'd rang-
era ara patrolling Ihu alrnnta
hero to prevent vloliincn umoiig
at ilklng coal milium, Union offl-
r In I n any that throo thouaatid
inlnera will bo on atrlko by
night prntimlliig againat a 30
pur cent wage nut. Martial law
hua boon formally proclaliiicd.
TEACHERSPICK
NEW OFFICERS
SISTERS PRINCIPAL IS
PRESIDENT
'. A. Howard, of Mnndillrlil, Kn-
dolnnl For Ktntri AhmcIiiIIou
l"rrlilrnr Former Bend
Superintendent Hprukcr.
Organisation of the Deachutos
County Tenchora' association, a fuat
uro of tha last day of the annual In
stitute here, roaulted thla morning In
thn election of W. T. McN'ulty, prin
cipal of tho Slaters achool, as pres
ident, Mm. Qertrudo Whltoia, Terre
bonne principal, as vice-president,
and Mra. J. I). Davldnon, principal
of the Coin ral achool of Ilcnd, aa secretary-treasurer..
Superintendent S.
W. Moore of Bend, McN'ulty, and Mrs.
Whltels were tho delegates chosen
to the stain association convention
which will be held In Portland be
tween Christmas and Jnuuary 1.
Tho county association nominated
C, A. Howard of Marshfleld for the
presidency of the stafto association,
lie Is now vlce-prealdeltt. 0. W. Anor
of Vale was endorsed fur the vice
presidency, and W. W. Green of
l'cndliiion, and l'aul Irvine of Hed
mond for tho executive committee.
Miss Kvn Itoche. of tho Itend high
school faculty. Is at present a mem
ber of tho committee.
I.unriirun In I'Vnturo
II. I.. Hopkins, superintendent of
the Ilnnd schools before the con
struction of tho present high school
building, was added to the apeakers
who appeared before the Institute to
day. He Is now profossor of sociology
ami ecnnomlra nt Pacific university,
and his address strossed tho Import
ance of Inculcating the principles of
tlniuorriicy in the class room.
Slxty-onn Instructors attended the
Informal luncheon given this noon
at thn Pilot Rutte Inn. Paul Irvine
of nediunnd presiding. With Miss
Nollle Tlfft of Ilond. bo wna a mem
ber of tho committee headed by Miss
Harriett ITmhaugh, principal of the
llend high school, which arranged
tho affair. An Interesting address
was given toward the close of the
luncheon by Rov. J. Edgar Purdy.
lllg Attentliinco Noted
This afternoon teachers at tbo In
stitute wnro trentod to tin unusually
exccllont musical program Including
solos by Miss Virginia Stewart, of
Head, mid Miss Grace Sherwood, of
Redmond, and duets by Miss Laura
Rand and Charles O. Wilson, of this
city.
Although there are only 90 tencu
ors In tho county, 107 were present
nt tho Institute County Superintend
ent J. Alton Thompson atntcd this
uftoriioon nftor the compilation of
registration figures. Of these, eight
wore from Lake county, two Ironi
Klamath, one from Jefferson, and six
wore touchers not nt present actively
following tholr profession. The In
stitute wus characterized by Super
intendent Thompson as the most suc
cessful In the history of the county.
DEFENDANT WINNER
IN SUIT OVER SEED
Alfred Muni, of Redmond, defend
ant, yestorduy won I Im suit brought
against hi m In circuit court by Will
Harsell nnd Paul Mertschlng alleg
ing tho sale of alfalfa seed In which
a considerable quantity of weed seed
wns found. R. S. Hamilton nppoarcd
fnr tho defendant, Paul C. King and
Ross Fnrnhum representing tho
plnluttrr. -
The oaso. Is probably the Inalto
bo tried by a Jury at the present torm
of court, Judge T. HI. J. Duffy Btatod
nftor ho hud complimented tho jur
ors on the expeditions mnnnor In
which thoy have disposed of the bus
iness coming boforo tbo court.
WILL BE
TOTAL OF ROLL
CALL SATURDAY
LEGIQN NOMINATIONS
FOR 1922 MADE
PLAN FOR NEW YEAR'S
('I'lixby Klierlln To lie Adjutant Anil
A. A. H) limns I'liiuiire Ollli it I'or
Coming Veur; Wright anil Hiiiih
ton CiiiiiliiliilfH fur Coiiiniiiniler
That the Red Cross Roll Call sub
scriptions for Ileud will reach 83,
r,00 by Riiturday night was the re
port of C. II. Knowles, chairman of
the committee In chnrgo of tho cam
paign, at lust night's mooting of
Percy A. Stevens PohI, American Le
gion. Tho post voted to continue Its
own monthly subscription to the
Homo Service section.
To plan entertainments for the re
mainder of 1921 for tho Legion a
committee was appointed consisting
of C. J. Catlow, Robert Innes and
Malcolm Connolly, Tracy Kulrchlld,
J. H. McLulland and Hurry H. Col
lentz were appointed to have charge
of tho bis New Years' Kvo parly,
which the post pluns to make a com
munity uffalr.
Two Place Contented
Nomination of candidates for post
offices, to be elected a the annual
meeting of the post December 16 lA
tho Klks' club hull, wus the princi
pal business of Inst night's meeting.
J. C. Wright, who has served on
many Important committees during
tho past yenr, and Earl Houston, who
has held the offices of adjutant and
vice commander and bus been a dele
gate to three stato conventions, wero
the nominees for commander. C. II.
Knowles and Jack Herbert were
named for vice commander.
Crosby Slievlln will be post adju
tant during thn coming yenr, and
A. A. Synuins finance officer, they
being tho only nominees. Names sug
gested for the executive committee
were; Frank R. Prlnco. C. T. Terrll.
Tracy Fiilrchild, Dr. C. F. llloom.JJr.
L. W. Galcheli. C. W. Ersklne, P.
Plerson, Ed Lyons. C. J. Cullow. J.
C. Wright, Henry N. Fowler. N. A.
Cobb, Jack Herbert, Ivan McOIIvruy,
Wlllard Houston, II. Cuto.
New Members Voted In
A large bronze eagle, donated by
G. W. llccknian, was presented to
the post nnd accepted with a vote
of thanks.
C. J. Cutlow, who attended the na
tional convention at Kansus City, re
ported some Interesting details of
tho gathering which hnd not previ
ously been made known here, par
ticularly tho fact that the conven
tion city has found It necessary to
purchase new ash cans for all of the
downtown streets.
Churlos A. Hastings and Leo H.
Ripley wero elected to membership.
l
FREMONT'S JOURNEY I OREGON
TOLD ON 68TH ANNIVERSARY OF
HISTORY MAKING EXPLORATIONS
Sixty-eight years ngo Brevet Cap
tain J. (', Fremont, Inter to attain
tho rank of general and to gain the
popular name of tho I'nthflnder, ex
plored Central Oregon after travers
ing the Rorky nimintnliu In aeroril
mice Willi the orders of Ills superior,
Colonel J. J. Abort, chief of the
topographical bureau. Tho report
of the exploring expedition, written
by Captain Fremont, was published
two years Inter on authorization of
the House of Representatives.. Of
especial local Interest, Fremont's ne
count of his Journey through the
Central Oregon country, will he re
printed from day. to iluy by The
Bulletin on, the sixty-eighth anni
versary of the ilato covering which
tho necoutit was written.
4' Nov. 3. After two hours rldo
through , a hilly country, covorod
aa all . the upland hore . appears
to bo ..with good green grass, we
Bend's Oldest World War Veteran
Will Recross Atlantic; Is Heir To
Fortune Through Death Of Sister
For tho twelfth time In bis life
and for Urn (aecond time In four
yours, II. Cuto of Ilelid, who holds
the distinction of being the oldest
fnembnr of Percy A. Stevens Post
No. 4, American Legion, and one
of the oldisst if not the oldest men !
In the stain to volunteer for active
service In thn world wur, will leave
early In the year for London where
he will asulHt In settling up the
estate of his sister. Miss Kllen
Cuto, who died recently in Swe
den. .Muny of Cuto'a relatives are
now living In Great Britain.
Under the terms of the will,
Culo Is one of the chief heirs and
Frozen Switch
Causes Wreck;
Two Lose Lives
(By United Praii UiTht Bend Bulletin.)
HALT LAKE, Nov. 18. Two
were killed, one fatally injured
and 25 hurt when a frozen
switch caused two electric
trains to collide near Taylors-
vllle, Utah, today.
CLUB TO SEEK
FINAL DETAILS FOR CLEANUP
CAMPAIGN RKING WORKED
OCT MONDAY LUNCHEON
WILL BE PEPPY AFFAIR.
With 14 men pledged to take part
tu the cleanup campaign which the
Ilcnd Commercial club, under the
direction of Lynn D. Mowat, field
representative of. the American City
bureau, will begin nt 9 o'clock Mon
day morning, pluns for the cam
palgn are rapidly Hearing comple
tion. Details were discussed this
noon at a luncheon at the Pilot
Butte Inn, when It was stated thut
at least 40 workers would take part
Monday and Tuesday.
Sixty new prospects are listed to
be canvassed for membership in the
club, and a number whose member
ship payments are delinquent will
also be called on. Iu tbls connec
tion. Secretary L. Amies states that
all but a small proportion of budget
subscriptions have been paid,
and that Is for memberships that
the chief delinquency exists.
Scoring of the teams, which will
be headed by T. H. Foley and E. L.
Payne, will take the form of the
tallying in a world series ball game,
Mowat said this afternoon. He an
nounced a luncheon which will be
given for all workers and pros
pective workers In the campaign at
the Pilot Butte Inn -Monday noon.
ut which no charge will be made to
the Individuals attending, and which
he guarantees will result in the re
mainder of the campaign being one
of the peppiest ever put on in Bend.
descended again Into the river bot
tom, along which we resumed our
sterile road - and In about four
miles reached the ford of the
Full rlvor, (Riviere mix Chutes) a
considerable tributary to the Colum
bin. We had heard,. on reaching the
Nez Perce fort a repetition In re-
gard to the account In regard to the
unsettlod character of the Columbia
Indians at tho present time; and to
our little pnrty they had at various
points mnnlfosted n not vory friend
ly disposition, In several attempts to
steal our horses. At this plnce I ex
pected to find a badly disposed band,
who had. plundered a party of 14
emigrant men n few (lays before, nnd
taken away tholr horses; and accord
Ingly we mndo the" necossnry propar
ntions for our security, but happily
mot with no difficulty;.
Tha river was high, divided Into
sevoral arms, with a rocky iBland at
(Continued from Page 3.)
NEW MEMBERS
will receive In"' the neighborhood
of 820,000. Cato plana to leave as
soon as he' can complete heavy
contracts which he has entered in
to for the sale of Central Oregon
potatoes. He will reengage. In the
potato business on a large scale
on his return.
Cato'a last trip to Europe was
during the world war, when he
embarked for France within five
weeks of bla enlistment In the air
service.
Cato has seven nephews, all liv
ing In Great Britain, and all world
war veterans. Four of them he saw
during his service overseas.
GRID SEASON
NEARING END
YALE-HARVARD CLASSIC STANDS
OCT AMONG FOOTBALL CON
TESTS SCHEDULED TO BE
PLAYED TOMORROW,
By Henry L. Farrell
(United Pro Stuff Correspondent)
NEW YORK, Nor. 18. On frost
hardened, fall-bitten , fields, 1921
football chants the first paragraph
of its dirge tomorrow.
With the exception of a few scat
tered Thanksgiving games and the
Army-Navy game a week from tomor
row, the old gridiron man will draw
his shroud around him and retire.
Only a few games of Importance
are scheduled which makes the card
look light coming after recent Satur
day carnivals. In which a score of
important battles occupied attention.
Rich In tradition and historic
glory, the Yale-Harvard battle of
course Is the game of the day. More
than 200.0QOfar.s would like to see
the lull Dog and the Crimson In bat
tle Instead of the 70,000 that will
pack the concrete seats of the big
Cambridge stadium. All seats were
sold more than two weeks ago.
Next In Importance In the east,
although there is nothing but partis
an alma mater sentiment attached
is the Syracuse-Dartmouth game on
the Polo Grounds. Both teams have
bad only an ordinary season and
neither is In line for the champion
ship. Princeton is through for the year,
having faded behind a drop curtain
Inst week after the Yale gams.
Cornell and Penn are idle In pre
paration for their annual Thanksgiv
ing battle and the Army and Navy
elevens are also having a day off get
ting ready for the big spectacle of the
year a week from tomorrow at the
Polo Grounds.
The banner attractions in the west
will be furnished by Ohio State and
Illinois, and Chicago and Wisconsin.
California and Stanford and Ore
gon and the Oregon Aggies will do
the entertaining on the coast.
Centre and Washington and Lee,
Georgia and Alabama and George
town and Boston college are the
headliners in the south. ,
FEDERAL HIGHWAY
ACT FAVORS WEST
$750,013 Made Available For Forest
Roads And Trails In Oregon,
Washington And Alaska
PORTLAND. Ore., Nov. IS. "The
signing by the president of the fed
eral highway act, appropriating $15,
000,000 for forest roads and trails,
makes available at once $758,913
for national forest roads In Oregon,
Washington and Alaska and marks
nn Important step toward the devel
opment of the great resources of our
national forests." states George H.
Cecil, district forester of the North
Pnclfie district.
"The bill provides $5,000,000 tor
Immediate expenditure and makes an
additional $10,000,000 available on
July 1, 1922. Tliere Is Immediately
available for road construction on
the national forests the following
amounts: Oregon, $310,790; Alas
ka, $258,273; Washington, $189,870.
This money will be used In extend
ing the present Inadequate road and
trail system of the nntlonal forests
of these two states and Alaska, tho
development of which Is so vital to
the effective protection and utiliza
tion, of their - valuable natural resources."
U. S. TO BUILD
UNTIL ACTUAL
RESULTS SEEN
NAVAL CONSTRUCTION
TO GO ON
BRITAIN STOPS WORK
America, However, Will Continue!,
Planning To Launch Drradnaaght
Tomorrow Think Lloyd-Georgn
Is Behind British Action.
(Br United Pre to The Bend Bulletin.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18. Tk
United States will not follow Great
Britain's naval suspension lead. Sec
retary Denby told the United Press
today following the cabinet's meet
ing. Construction will be carried on
until the conference reaches a def
inite understanding.
Great Britain today took the init
ial step In carrying out the proposed
naval armament limitation by order
ing suspension of construction on
her dreadnaughts. The action gave
impetus to sentiment In the United
States congress for resolutions order
ing suspension of the American
building program.
In this connection it was believed
that launching of the dreadnaugat.
West Virginia, scheduled for tomor
row, would take place despite con
gressional action.
Congress Makes Demand
Great Britain's action was placed
before President Harding and the
cabinet for consideration, with a
probable decision later today as to
whether the United States would fol
low Britain's action. Britain Is re
garded as taking action upon the rec
ommendation of Lloyd George, so aa
to force the success of the arms con
ference despite vigorous opposition ot
whatever recalcitrants may attempt
to 'block-fts efforts.-' -
Congress today demanded that
President Harding stop construction
on America's taval program, follow
ing the announcement that the Brit
ish admiralty had stopped construc
tion on four super ships.
BANDIT FACES
TWO CHARGES
CRIMINAL ATTACK ON MEXICAN
GIRL AND ROBBERY OF POST
OFFICE ALLEGED AGAINST
ROY GARDNER. -
(By United Prexl to The Bend Bulletin.)
PHOENIX, Nor. 18. Two charges
faced Roy Gardner today robbing .
of the postoffice at Maricopa, Ariz.,
and criminally attacking a Mexican
girl, Maria Munoz. Warrants have
been issued on both charges, and
may postpone taking the bandit to
Fort Leavenworth,
He may be tried on these charges,
together with that of attempting to
rob the mail train at the time he
was captured.
TO DRAIN CANALS
AND CLEAN SYSTEM
Water will, be let out of both mala
canals of the Central Oregon irri
gation district Monday, was the an
nouncement made by George W. Kan
off. irrigation superintendent, on his
arrival in Bend yesterday. As soon
aa sufficient time for drying has
been allowed, the cleaning which has
been going on in the ditches and la
terals for-some time will bo rushed
in the canal systems. Eight crewa
of men will be put at work, the la
bor to be drawn from the farm pop
ulation ot the district, Knnoff said.
During the winter water will be
turned into. the canals and laterals
for domestic use ouce every three
weeks. '
SENATE WOULD BAN
BEER AS MEDICINE'
(By United PrrM to The Bend Bulletin.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18. Ths
senate today adopted the conference
report on the antt beer bill; thus ban
ning use of beer tor medicine. The
bill now goes to President Harding.