East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, August 01, 2019, Page A3, Image 19

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    REGION
Thursday, August 1, 2019
East Oregonian
A3
Aspen Springs project could open by end of year
Lifeways broke
ground on
project in 2016
By JADE MCDOWELL
East Oregonian
HERMISTON — An
acute psychiatric care facil-
ity being built in Hermis-
ton could accept its first
patient by the end of 2019.
Lifeways broke ground
on Aspen Springs Psychi-
atric Hospital, a secure
16-bed facility for patients
with an acute mental health
disorder, in 2016. Micaela
Cathey, Lifeways’ execu-
tive director for Umatilla
County, said the project
recently passed its initial
site review with the state
and is moving forward
with the review for the
state licensing process, fol-
lowed by Centers for Medi-
care and Medicaid Services
certification.
“We’re very excited to
bring this to the commu-
nity,” she said. “We’re as
anxious for this to open as
Staff photo by Jade McDowell
Aspen Springs Psychiatric Hospital is going through the review process to receive the necce-
sary certifications for operation.
the community is.”
As part of the CMS pro-
cess, Lifeways anticipates
a “soft opening” of about
six beds in November or
December, before transi-
tioning into full 16-bed
service at the beginning
of 2020. Cathey said they
will hire between 35 and
40 employees, from social
workers to nurses, to fully
staff the facility.
When Lifeways broke
ground in summer 2016
they expected to open in
about a year, but Cathey
said meeting all of the reg-
ulations in place for such
a secure facility “has led
to some lengthening of
the timeline, much to our
chagrin.”
Elizabeth Johnsen, exec-
utive director of business
excellence, said an acute
psychiatric care facility has
to meet higher standards
than even a hospital, such
as “anti-ligature” measures
to prevent possible suicide
attempts.
“The intention is to make
it the most safe we can for
patients and staff, which is
why we wanted to do it right
the first time,” she said.
Aspen Springs will
include 16 individual rooms
for patients, a dining area,
common area, reflection
room, nurses station, offices
for therapists, a fenced
courtyard and more. Tours
will be available to the pub-
lic before the facility begins
providing care.
Johnsen and Cathey said
Aspen Springs will fill a
“huge gap” in mental health
care in Eastern Oregon. Cur-
rently, most patients experi-
encing a mental health crisis
are transported to facilities
on the western side of the
state, pulling them away
from support systems like
friends and family.
Now, they said, if some-
one in Umatilla County is
in a crisis they can stay in
Hermiston, where fam-
ily can visit, participate in
family therapy sessions and
work with care providers
in person to create a plan
for transitioning the patient
back out of the acute care
facility. Lifeways staff who
provide inpatient care at
Aspen Springs will also be
able to coordinate closely
with Lifeways staff who
provide outpatient services
to the client.
“The key is that we will
be able to serve our commu-
nity directly in the commu-
nity,” Cathey said.
It will also add more
beds to what has been a
shortage of psychiatric beds
in Oregon and across the
nation, reducing wait times
for care.
The facility is located at
1212 Linda Avenue, near
Lifeways’ Hermiston offices.
Construction underway at Development commission discusses
Wildhorse Resort & Casino plan to buy distressed real estate
By ANTONIO SIERRA
East Oregonian
Staff photo by Ben Lonergan
Construction crews with Lydig Construction of Kennewick, Wash., begin excavation at
Wildhorse Resort & Casino in preparation for an $85 million expansion project set to be
completed in August or September of 2020. The project will include expansion of existing
features, such as the cineplex and children’s entertainment center, as well as new addi-
tions, such as an arcade, food court and 24-lane bowling alley.
BRIEFLY
Hermiston Avenue lane
closures planned for next week
HERMISTON — Contractors will be
shutting down one lane of traffic at a time
on Hermiston Avenue between Southwest
Third Street and Southwest 10th Street
throughout next week as they overlay new
pavement on the street.
The lane closures will start Monday,
and will not affect the Umatilla County
Fair Parade scheduled for Saturday. The
schedule was changed from the original
plan to complete the work ahead of the
fair parade.
After paving between Third and 10th
streets is complete, Hermiston Avenue
will be closed between First and Third
streets for a more extensive rebuild of that
portion of road. Businesses inside the clo-
sure area will remain open, with parking
on side streets and behind the buildings.
PENDLETON — Dubi-
ous of a proposal to reduce
housing blight in the urban
renewal district by offering
a forgivable loan program,
Mayor John Turner sug-
gested the city it take a step
further: Buy blighted houses
directly off the market, fix
them up with the help of a
local developer, and sell the
renovated property to a pro-
spective homeowner.
At a Pendleton Devel-
opment Commission work-
shop, a developer with prop-
erty in the district voiced his
own concerns with the may-
or’s idea.
Bruce Gianotti told the
council that he bought a
rental house on Southwest
Court Avenue 19 years ago,
but decided to renovate it
and sell it based on advice
given to him by a real estate
agent.
But despite modernizing
the house, Gianotti said the
property continues to sit on
the market.
“I’ll get my money back,
but I’m not making a reason-
able profit on the conditional
investment I put into it,” he
said.
Gianotti is selling the
house for about $154,000, a
price that doesn’t fall too far
outside the norm.
Charles Denight, the
commission’s
associate
director, studied the urban
renewal district housing
market over the past year
and a half and found that the
average sales price in 2018
was $120,000, and $154,000
over the first six months of
2019.
Denight also presented
a proposal where the city
would provide partially for-
givable loans to house flip-
pers to buy and renovate
houses.
But Gianotti said the city’s
cost estimates were probably
conservative because they
weren’t factoring in carry-
over and sales costs. He also
questioned whether the city
should get into the mortgage
business.
Gianotti suggested the
blighted housing program
work similarly to the ele-
vator and façade grant pro-
gram, a reimbursement
grant for a percentage of the
renovation costs.
As discussions contin-
ued, Turner suggested the
city return to the drawing
board.
“It sounds like my initial
proposal is not very work-
able, but something similar to
it might be if it were a grant
that would reimburse the ren-
ovator ... a certain portion of
the project,” he said.
While no concrete ideas
emerged at the meeting,
Denight suggested coun-
cil and committee mem-
bers take their time until
they come up with a pro-
posal they are all comfort-
able with.
Some councilors said they
would be more supportive of
programs that mainly tar-
geted owner-occupied hous-
ing instead of rental housing
and included more cost shar-
ing from the homeowner.
Mom &
Baby
Support
Group
SUPPORT GROUPS
THURSDAY, AUG. 1
OPEN AA MEETING, 12 p.m., Episcopal Church
of the Redeemer, 241 S.E. Second St., Pendle-
ton. Coffee is provided. (Ed 541-207-2548)
AS BILL SEES IT AA MEETING, 12 p.m., com-
plex, 680 W. Harper Road, Hermiston.
REBOUNDERS STROKE SUPPORT GROUP,
1:30 p.m., St. Anthony Hospital conference
room 3 or 4, 2801 St. Anthony Way, Pendleton.
(Shawna 541-969-1865)
LOST AND FOUND YOUTH OUTREACH,
3 p.m., Pendleton Recreation Center, 510 S.W.
Dorion Ave., Pendleton. Help for youth 12-18
facing challenges. (Leslie 541-276-3987)
WOMEN WITH DISABILITIES AND DOMES-
TIC VIOLENCE, 4 p.m., Eastern Oregon Cen-
ter for Independent Living, 322 S.W. Third
St., Pendleton. A safe, secure environment to
learn skills and develop tools to move forward
after abuse and violence. (Linda Valentine
541-276-1037)
HEALTHY CHOICES AA MEETING,
5-6:30 p.m., St. Anthony Hospital conference
room 1, 2801 St. Anthony Way, Pendleton.
(541-207-2548)
WOMEN FOR SOBRIETY SUPPORT GROUP,
5:30-7 p.m., First Christian Church, 516 S. Main
St., Milton-Freewater. New members welcome.
(Kimberlie Krieg 541-861-3283)
TOPS, 6 p.m., Peace Lutheran Church, 210
N.W. Ninth St., Pendleton. 6 p.m. weigh-in,
6:30-7:30 p.m. meeting. (Heather Endersby
541-969-6997)
CELEBRATE RECOVERY, 6-9 p.m., First Assem-
bly of God Church, 1911 S.E. Court Ave., Pend-
leton. 6-7 p.m. large group, 6-8 p.m. Celebra-
tion Place (children K-5), 7-8 p.m. open share
group, 8-9 p.m. Solid Rock Cafe social time
(all ages). Christ-centered 12-step program
for those with hurts, habits and hangups.
Childcare is available for children ages 1-5.
(541-276-6417)
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE/SEXUAL ASSAULT
WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP, 6-7:30 p.m., call
for location, Pendleton. Sponsored by Domes-
tic Violence Services. (541-276-3322)
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE/SEXUAL ASSAULT
WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP, 6-7:30 p.m., call
for location, Hermiston. Sponsored by Domes-
tic Violence Services. (541-567-0424)
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8/01
Cineplex Show Times
$5 Classic Movie
Showing Wednesday
Minions at 10
and Airplane at 12
Fast & Furious Presents:
Hobbs & Shaw (PG13)
7:00p 10:00p
Once Upon a Time
in Hollywood (R)
3:10a* 6:30p 9:50p
The Lion King (PG)
4:00p 6:40p 9:20p
Spider-Man:
Far from Home (PG13)
4:10p 7:00p 9:50p
Toy Story 4 (G)
4:20p 6:50p 9:10p
* Matinee Pricing
wildhorseresort.com • 541-966-1850
Pendleton, OR I-84 - Exit 216
We meet every Friday 9AM -11AM
at St Anthony Hospital
in Conference Rooms 3 & 4
This support group is Free and
specifically geared toward
Moms and Caregivers.
We provide Free snacks,
support, breastfeeding help
and baby weigh ins.
Debt managers not
managing debt?
Know before you owe
dfr.oregon.gov
St. Anthony Clinic
3001 St. Anthony Way
Pendleton, Oregon
www.sahpendleton.org