East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, October 19, 2018, Page Page 2A, Image 2

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    NORTHWEST
East Oregonian
Page 2A
Friday, October 19, 2018
Richardson’s treatment for cancer raises concerns
only, “It’s as serious as brain
cancer is.”
Since Richardson revealed
his diagnosis, his office has
continued its usual work of
releasing audit reports, regis-
tering corporations and pre-
paring for the Nov. 6 election.
Richardson has continued
posting occasional videos to
his official Facebook page,
such as ones in which he
encourages residents to vote
or asks fifth-graders to apply
for his Kid Governor pro-
gram. The latter was posted
just this week.
Yet there have been signs
that the cancer or the treat-
ment of it may be taking a toll.
Richardson’s
physical
appearance has changed as
a side effect, giving the nor-
mally trim statesman a puffy
face and eyes. In September,
he attended the national con-
ference of ombudsmen, but
By GORDON FRIEDMAN
The Oregonian/OregonLive
PORTLAND — How
severely brain cancer is
affecting Oregon Secretary
of State Dennis Richardson
remains unclear, as a curtail-
ment of his public schedule
and delegation of some duties
to a deputy raise questions
about his future in the state’s
second-highest office.
Richardson, 69, was
elected secretary of state in
2016 and is the only Repub-
lican holding statewide office
in Oregon. He disclosed his
cancer diagnosis in June and
said he has been aware of the
brain tumor since May.
Richardson and his aides
have declined to give spe-
cifics about his diagnosis or
treatment regimen. Asked
for details Wednesday, Deb
Royal, his chief of staff, said
AP Photo/Timothy J. Gonzalez, File
In this Nov. 8, 2016, file photo, Oregon Republican Sec-
retary of State candidate Dennis Richardson greets
supporters at the Salem Convention Center in Salem.
Deputy Secretary of State
Leslie Cummings gave his
scheduled opening remarks.
And a senior state official,
who recently had a meeting
with Richardson, described
his cognitive abilities as
“severely diminished.” The
official said it is unclear if that
is due to cancer treatments
or the disease itself. “He was
such an energetic person,” the
official said. “It just makes the
contrast stronger.”
Richardson, who as sec-
retary of state is second in
line to the governorship, has
declared he does not intend
to resign. Royal signaled
Wednesday that he hopes to
be re-elected in 2020.
But Richardson has del-
egated away one key duty,
even if temporarily. This week
he informed Brown and state
Treasurer Tobias Read that
Cummings will sit in his place
with them on the State Land
Board, after he struggled to
communicate at the board’s
previous meeting. Royal said
that struggle was because can-
cer treatments have rendered
Richardson exhausted.
“These treatments, they
knock your socks off some-
times,” Royal said.
Cummings, the deputy, is
already charged with oversee-
ing day-to-day operations of
Richardson’s agency. Cum-
mings was previously a state
technology manager, and
briefly embroiled in a con-
troversy involving an expen-
sive IT project, before being
named deputy secretary of
state by Richardson.
If Richardson were to
leave office, Brown would
appoint an interim secretary
of state. She has already done
that once, when she appointed
longtime Democratic legis-
lative aide Jeanne Atkins in
2015 after she became gov-
ernor upon John Kitzhaber’s
resignation.
Royal said Richardson’s
aides have not discussed his
leaving office and remain
positive.
“We’re planning for him to
pull through this,” she said.
Measure 104 could make it harder to raise state fees
regulate certain crops like
blueberries and hazelnuts,
and licensing boards, which
oversee professions from
teaching to tattooing.
Creating or increasing
fees now only takes a major-
ity of legislators to say yes.
Supporters of Measure
104 say they want the state’s
Constitution to require a
Oregon imposes thou-
sands of fees on everything
from wastewater permits to
overnight camping fees in
state parks, and is expected
to round up about $1.5 bil-
lion worth of them in the
current two-year budget.
Many fees are tied to the
state’s commodity commis-
sions, which promote and
By CLAIRE WITHYCOMBE
Capital Bureau
SALEM — If you drive,
hunt, or run a business in
Oregon, you pay a fee to the
state for that privilege.
A measure on the state-
wide ballot could make it
harder for the Legislature to
increase those fees.
Forecast for Pendleton Area
TODAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Nice with plenty of
sunshine
Pleasant with
plenty of sunshine
Pleasant with
sunshine
Sunny and nice
Sun followed by
clouds
69° 41°
69° 40°
PENDLETON TEMPERATURE FORECAST
68° 40°
67° 42°
66° 45°
HERMISTON TEMPERATURE FORECAST
70° 37°
70° 37°
68° 39°
70° 40°
OREGON FORECAST
68° 48°
ALMANAC
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.
PENDLETON
through 3 p.m. yest.
HIGH
LOW
TEMP.
Seattle
Olympia
61/43
68/43
69/35
Longview
Kennewick Walla Walla
68/46
Lewiston
70/42
68/36
Astoria
61/43
Pullman
Yakima 68/34
65/37
69/43
Portland
Hermiston
74/45
The Dalles 70/37
Salem
Corvallis
74/39
Yesterday
Normals
Records
La Grande
69/38
PRECIPITATION
John Day
Eugene
Bend
75/40
76/38
74/42
Ontario
70/35
Caldwell
Burns
65°
31°
64°
38°
85° (1940) 23° (1976)
24 hours ending 3 p.m.
Month to date
Normal month to date
Year to date
Last year to date
Normal year to date
Albany
75/41
0.00"
1.14"
0.33"
6.29"
7.19"
6.89"
WINDS (in mph)
69/36
71/28
0.00"
1.39"
0.59"
7.91"
12.55"
9.53"
through 3 p.m. yest.
HIGH
LOW
TEMP.
Pendleton 69/38
76/42
24 hours ending 3 p.m.
Month to date
Normal month to date
Year to date
Last year to date
Normal year to date
HERMISTON
Enterprise
69/41
74/41
65°
37°
63°
39°
85° (1940) 20° (1917)
PRECIPITATION
Moses
Lake
63/38
Aberdeen
65/39
66/42
Tacoma
Yesterday
Normals
Records
Spokane
Wenatchee
65/46
Today
Medford
82/43
Sat.
NE 3-6
N 4-8
Boardman
Pendleton
NE 3-6
NNE 4-8
75/32
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
Sunrise today
Sunset tonight
Moonrise today
Moonset today
7:17 a.m.
6:03 p.m.
4:15 p.m.
1:47 a.m.
Full
Last
New
First
Oct 24
Oct 31
Nov 7
Nov 15
NATIONAL EXTREMES
Yesterday’s National Extremes: (for the 48 contiguous states)
High 93° in Winter Haven, Fla. Low 4° in Bodie State Park, Calif.
NATIONAL WEATHER TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
-0s
0s
showers t-storms
business owners may have
gotten a bigger tax break
in the wake of last year’s
recent federal tax overhaul.
A majority of lawmakers
voted to disallow a 20 per-
cent income tax deduction
for qualifying business own-
ers on the state level, spark-
ing a lawsuit from state Sen.
Brian Boquist, R-Dallas, and
state Sen. Herman Baertsch-
iger, R-Grants Pass.
Anthony Smith, state
director at the Oregon chap-
ter of the National Federation
of Independent Business,
said that a non-controversial
fee increase likely would
pass even with a superma-
jority requirement.
And Smith thinks such
a requirement will require
legislators to work together
to reach a consensus on the
more controversial fees —
which he would see as a pos-
itive change.
“More debate, more con-
sensus, more coalition build-
ing is probably a good thing
for the state,” Smith said.
Meanwhile, state Sen.
Mark Hass, chair of the
Senate Finance and Reve-
nue Committee, opposes the
measure because he thinks
tax policy shouldn’t be writ-
ten into the Constitution.
He said including fees in
its provisions could affect
the overall budget process.
Budget bills often include
fee increases.
“I think it’s not out of
the question, it could have
an effect,” Hass said. “Now
you’re giving decision-mak-
ing on day-to-day operations
to a small group of people,
12 to 13 people, on a fee,
whether it’s necessary to a
particular group or to run a
state agency.”
Hass, a Democrat from
Beaverton in the Legisla-
ture since 2001, said fees
have gotten more controver-
sial with the rise of the fis-
cally conservative tea party.
“There’s just certain peo-
ple who will vote against all
fees, no matter what,” Hass
said, “Even if the constitu-
ent group requested the fee
increase, they’ll still vote
against it.”
Revenue to fund state
operations is harder to come
by, which means the state
has been more dependent on
sources, such as fees, said
Legislative Fiscal Officer
Ken Rocco.
The Oregon Department
of Fish and Wildlife, for
example, got about 29 per-
cent of its revenues from
license fees in the 2015-17
budget.
“I think what people are
more apt to question is, how
often do you raise fees?”
Rocco said.
“And how big is the
increase? And how is it
justifiable, what are you
doing differently that would
require you to generate more
money from fees?”
Reporter Claire Withy-
combe: cwithycombe@
eomediagroup.com or 503-
385-4903.Withycombe is a
reporter for the East Ore-
gonian working for the Ore-
gon Capital Bureau, a col-
laboration of EO Media
Group, Pamplin Media
Group, and Salem Reporter.
SUN AND MOON
Klamath Falls
-10s
greater number of lawmak-
ers to approve fee changes.
Measure 104 means
three-fifths, or a “superma-
jority,” of lawmakers in the
House and Senate would
have to vote “yes” to pass
fee changes
That matters because the
current makeup of the Leg-
islature — where Democrats
are one seat shy of a super-
majority in each chamber —
means that bills subject to a
three-fifths voting require-
ment have to get some
Republican support to pass.
Supporters point to
recent efforts by Demo-
cratic lawmakers to create
a carbon pricing fee as jus-
tification for changing the
Constitution.
They say such legisla-
tion raises revenue but isn’t
technically considered a tax,
which requires 60 percent
approval by lawmakers in
the House and Senate.
“By calling it a fee instead
of a tax, they get around a
three-fifths majority,” said
Paul Rainey, who manages
the Yes on 104 campaign.
Measure 104 would
also impose stricter voting
requirements on bills that
change tax credits, exemp-
tions and deductions.
The “Yes” campaign has
received significant backing
from the real estate indus-
try, which is eager to protect
a tax deduction on mortgage
interest that saves Orego-
nians about a $500 million
on their taxes per year.
And had Measure 104’s
provisions been in place ear-
lier this year, certain Oregon
10s
rain
20s
flurries
30s
snow
40s
ice
50s
cold front
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high
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BRIEFLY
Commissioner: Lawmakers
ignored subpoenas in #MeToo
probe
PORTLAND (AP) — State Labor Com-
missioner Brad Avakian in a court fil-
ing has accused top legislative officials of
ignoring subpoenas issued by his agency in
its investigation of sexual harassment at the
Oregon Capitol.
The Oregonian/OregonLive reports the
filings Wednesday seek contempt of court
rulings and $1,000 a day fines against
Senate President Peter Courtney, House
Speaker Tina Kotek, Senate Republi-
can Leader Jackie Winters and nine oth-
ers who Avakian accuses of disregarding
subpoenas.
Through a private attorney, Edward
Harnden, legislative officials subpoenaed
by the bureau all declined to turn over
requested records and sit for interviews.
They argued its demand for informa-
tion was overly broad, and said compli-
ance would require them to break pledges
of confidentiality made to people who
reported harassment.
Representatives for Courtney, Kotek
and Winters directed questions to Harn-
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den, who said he’s confident a judge will
find no wrongdoing by members of the
Legislature.
Federal court: Salmon must
have protection from warm
water
PORTLAND (AP) — A federal court
has ruled that the U.S. Environmental Pro-
tection Agency must come up with a plan
to protect salmon from warm water tem-
peratures, which can be fatal for the fish
species.
Oregon Public Broadcasting reports
Thursday that record-high water tempera-
tures in rivers across the Pacific Northwest
in 2015 led environmental groups to sue
the agency. That summer, around 250,000
adult sockeye died in the Columbia and
Snake rivers.
The threatened and endangered salmon
and steelhead can die if water gets above
70 degrees.
The Wednesday ruling says dams are a
big reason rivers get too warm.
Columbia Riverkeeper’s Brett Vanden-
Heuvel says the EPA now must figure out
how to minimize the impact of the dams on
water temperature.
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