East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, December 28, 2017, Image 1

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SPORTS/1B
NATION/8A
REGION/3A
FORMER
BUCKS
GIVE BACK
IN THE HEART
OF TRUMP
COUNTRY
Second suit
fi led between
Hamley’s
co-owners
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2017
142nd Year, No. 51
WINNER OF THE 2017 ONPA GENERAL EXCELLENCE AWARD
One dollar
Most cans,
bottles will
add dime
deposit in
January
With few exceptions,
containers to become
refundable in 2018
By JADE MCDOWELL
East Oregonian
Staff photo by E.J. Harris
Brace for impact
Juan Ortega, 15, of Pendleton prepares for a hard landing while jumping a plastic sled on Wednesday while sledding at Aldrich
Park in Pendleton.
Four laws that made a difference in 2017
By PARIS ACHEN
Capital Bureau
we have an obligation to keep
each other safe,” Parrish said.
Many of the hundreds of laws
Oregon legislators pass each year
may go largely unnoticed by the
public.
Several laws, however, left
a palpable mark on the lives
of Oregonians in 2017. The
Pamplin/EO Capital Bureau has
highlighted four recent laws that
made an impact in the past year.
Pumping your own gas in
Eastern Oregon
Oregon is one of only two
states in the nation where residents
are prohibited from pumping their
own gas. While this may seem
to be a luxury for some urban
dwellers, it has been a source of
consternation for motorists and
gas station owners in rural parts of
Eastern Oregon.
In Heppner, for instance, there
is only one gas station in town, and
it isn’t open 24 hours a day.
During hunting season, the
line of motorists waiting for the
gas station to open sometimes
extended four blocks down Main
Street, said Heppner resident
LeAnn Wright, an offi ce support
specialist for the Morrow County
Juvenile Department.
Two years ago, the Legislature
passed a bill to allow self-fueling
between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. in
certain rural counties, to prevent
travelers from being stranded over-
night. Earlier this year, lawmakers
expanded the timeframe for
Distracted-driving restrictions
Oregon’s
new
distract-
ed-driving law closed loopholes
in a preexisting ban on holding
a cellphone while driving and
enhanced penalties for violations.
House Bill 2597 expanded the
ban to include holding any mobile
electronic device while driving,
even while waiting at a stoplight.
Drivers face a fi ne of up to $1,000
for their fi rst offense.
Less than a month after the
law took effect Oct. 1, Rep. Julie
Parrish, R-West Linn — who
voted for the law — was pulled
over and fi ned $265 for using her
cellphone while driving.
She was using the phone
to get directions to the KATU
EO Media Group fi le
From stricter distracted driving laws to minimum wage increas-
es, some of Oregon’s hundreds of new laws were more palpable
than others in 2017.
studio in Portland, where she was
scheduled to give an interview,
she said.
“Old habits die hard for those
of us who were introduced to
cellphones before there were
specifi c laws related to distracted
driving and phone use,” Parrish
said. “It might be diffi cult for
people to break a years-long habit
of driving and using a cellphone,
but it’s a habit I never want my
kids to start.”
Nearly 3,500 people were
killed and about 391,000
injured in motor vehicle crashes
involving distracted drivers in the
United States In 2015, according
to the most recent statistics from
the National Highway Traffi c
Safety Administration.
“We all share the roads, and
See LAWS/8A
Starting Monday, Oregonians
will have more incentive to recycle
their old Gatorade bottles and Red
Bull cans.
Oregon’s can and bottle deposit
law is expanding in 2018 from soda,
beer and water to include a long list
of other beverages whose containers
can now be redeemed for a 10 cent
deposit.
“Generally, if you can pour it and
drink it, it’s covered,” a notice on the
Oregon Liquor Control Commis-
sion’s website says.
There are still exceptions
for wine, distilled spirits, infant
formula, milk and meal-replacement
beverages. But an updated list of
containers now includes sealed
containers between 4 ounces and 1.5
liters for coffee, tea, juice, energy
drinks, sports drinks, protein shakes,
kombucha and several other bever-
ages.
The Oregon Beverage Recy-
cling Cooperative, which runs the
BottleDrop center in Hermiston and
works with beverage distributors
throughout the state to coordinate
recycling of more than 1.2 billion
containers per year, wrote in a news
release that it had invested more
than $3 million in new machinery,
including $2 million in BottleDrop
centers and $1.1 million in new
sorting machines at grocery stores to
prepare for the change. It also added
16 new employees, several new
trucks and trailers and expanded
capacity at a plastic recycling facility
in St. Helens.
“The expansion of the bottle bill
that starts on Jan. 1 is an important
step toward bringing the success of
the bottle bill in line with the kinds
of products that are out there today,
keeping more litter out of Oregon’s
beautiful natural areas, and making
sure that those containers are getting
recycled,” wrote Jules Bailey, chief
stewardship offi cer of the OBRC.
Many
recyclers,
including
Pendleton Sanitary Service, have
stopped accepting plastic containers
due to new restrictions from China
that have stopped overseas exports
of mixed plastics. But according to
the OBRC news release, 100 percent
of the plastic collected by the coop-
erative at grocery stores and Bottle-
See DEPOSIT/8A
PENDLETON
From Africa to Oregon
Couple moves to
Pendleton from Namibia
By KATHY ANEY
East Oregonian
Kathy Setzer’s journey to Pendleton
started 10,000 miles away in southern
Africa during the height of summer and
ended in a frozen winterland.
It was about a year ago when the
couple left the hot, arid climate of
Windhoek, Namibia, and fl ew to Port-
land where winter gripped the city with
a veneer of ice and snow. They waited a
couple of days to fi nish the trek, using
the time to buy a new car, until the
weather eased enough for them to brave
the Columbia Gorge. A job waited for
Our New
Neighbors
MeetÊEasternÊOregonÕsÊ
newestÊresidents
Jim in Pendleton where he’d been hired
to direct the Umatilla County Public
Health Department.
Kathy and Jim journeyed east on
Interstate 84 and arrived unscathed.
Though Jim had traveled to Pendleton
months earlier for an interview, this was
Kathy’s fi rst glimpse of her new home
except for some Googling sessions
while still in Namibia. Upon arrival,
their car slipped as it navigated their
steep neighborhood street but safely
See SETZER/8A
Staff photo by Kathy Aney
Kathy Setzer moved to Pendleton a year ago from the African
country of Namibia.