East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, December 22, 2017, Page Page 6B, Image 14

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    Page 6B
East Oregonian
PEANUTS
COFFEE BREAK
Friday, December 22, 2017
DEAR ABBY
BY CHARLES M . SCHULZ
European vacation plans are
tripped up by broken ankle
FOR BETTER OR WORSE
BY LYNN JOHNSTON
B.C.
BY JOHNNY HART
PICKLES
BY BRIAN CRANE
BEETLE BAILEY
BY MORT WALKER
Dear Abby: I had planned a trip to
Some people make excuses for
Europe with my friend “Elizabeth,”
him because he’s bipolar, but I don’t
a friend of hers and Elizabeth’s
want another holiday ruined because
daughter. The plan was I would share
of his behavior (which can be unpre-
rooms with Elizabeth. We paid for the
dictable). Must the rest of us sit on
hotels in advance.
pins and needles hoping he doesn’t
Shortly before our scheduled
explode this Christmas? I’d prefer
departure I fell, broke my ankle and
not to invite him until he has better
couldn’t go. We tried unsuccessfully
control of himself. Your opinion,
Jeanne
to obtain some kind of refunds, and Phillips please? — Hoping For Happy
travel insurance paid only if the acci-
Holidays
Advice
dent happened while we were actually
Dear Hoping: You have a point.
traveling.
A solution might be to talk directly
I was out $2,000. Elizabeth’s friend with your relative and explain that if he’s
offered me $500. Elizabeth, feeling some taking his medication — which means there
obligation, also offered me $500. I feel guilty will be no unpredictable outbursts — he is
taking Elizabeth’s money because she paid welcome to be your guest for Christmas. If
for herself and her daughter. I think the other not, however, he should make other plans.
woman should give me at least half — not just
Dear Abby: On Veterans’ Day I visited
$500 — because she derived 100 percent of my family’s cemetery plot and noticed my
the benefit. Also, she has never reached out to closest uncle does not have a military service
me directly at all.
marker like his two older brothers do. “Uncle
No money has been received at this point. Claude” had frequently mentioned to me
Should I just write it off? Or am I wrong to how important a service marker was to him. I
expect some of the money back? — Money discussed it with his two out-of-state children
Woes In The East
several times after his death.
Dear Money Woes: Yes, you are wrong.
Almost two years have passed now, and it
Nobody owes you anything. Accidents happen, appears getting the marker might not happen.
but the broken ankle was your bad luck. It was Should I inquire about this with my cousins,
generous of Elizabeth and her friend to offer offer to assist them in getting and placing
you any money at all. My advice is to accept it the marker or let it go? I did place a small
graciously, write the rest off, and stop looking flag on his grave later in the day. — Military
for someone to be mad at.
Service Marker
Dear Abby: One of my relatives has bipolar
Dear M.S.M.: Discuss this with your
disorder, and as far as I know he takes medi- cousins once more and ask if they would like
cine for it. However, at our Christmas celebra- you to pursue getting the marker for your
tion last year he became verbally aggressive uncle. There may be reasons why it hasn’t
and abusive toward a family member who had happened — including that they may not be
done nothing to provoke it. Needless to say, it able to afford the expense. You will never
know unless you inquire.
put a damper on the festivities.
DAYS GONE BY
GARFIELD
BLONDIE
BY JIM DAVIS
BY DEAN YOUNG AND STAN DRAKE
100 Years Ago
From the East Oregonian
Dec. 22, 1917
Miss Frankie Sturdivant, who went to
Pendleton with the drafted boys last week,
had some experience on returning to Ukiah.
While she was in Pendleton a heavy rain fell
which made traveling in a car very hard. But
Miss Sturdivant not being easily discouraged
started for home, and all went well until she
reached the summit of the Yellowjacket moun-
tain, where she found a foot of snow. Here the
car refused to go further and, while debating
what course to pursue, a lone horseman rode
up and she asked him if he could assist her.
He kindly said yes, and having a long lariat
on his saddle, he soon had the rope fastened
to the car and around the saddle horn and he
pulled the car up two or three steep places,
and she came on to town long after dark, with
everything covered with mud and headlights
gleaming, and laughingly said, “Tis good to
be here.”
50 Years Ago
From the East Oregonian
Dec. 22, 1967
A semi-truck and tractor sheared off a
power pole at SE 9th and Frazer this morning
when it failed to make the curve on the
slush-covered street. The power pole fell
across the garage driveway at the residence of
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Burns, 420 SE 9th. Mrs.
Burns said this is the fourth time a vehicle
has hit the power pole in the six months the
family has lived in the house. “I’ve just about
had it,” she told the East Oregonian. “I won’t
even let my children play in the front yard any
more.” Mrs. Burns said the power pole has
saved the garage in each instance. Warning
signs to slow down on the curve have also
been knocked down by motorists who “take
that curve too fast.” “The police finally put the
sign up across the street,” she said.
25 Years Ago
From the East Oregonian
Dec. 22, 1992
Quarterback Tony Hilde of Pendleton and
defensive lineman Joe Donnerberg of West
Linn have been named state Class 4A prep
football players of the year by The Oregonian.
Hilde, a senior, passed for 2,184 yards and 17
touchdowns and ran for 960 years and 13
touchdowns for the Buckaroos. He also was
named to the all-state team as a defensive
back. He has been a four-sport star at Pend-
leton, where he led the Bucks to a 9-2 record
and the second round of the football playoffs
this fall, their best finish in several seasons.
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
DILBERT
THE WIZARD OF ID
LUANN
ZITS
BY SCOTT ADAMS
BY BRANT PARKER AND JOHNNY HART
BY GREG EVANS
BY JERRY SCOTT AND JIM BORGMAN
Today is the 356th day of
2017. There are nine days left
in the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Dec. 22, 1944, during
the World War II Battle of
the Bulge, U.S. Brig. Gen.
Anthony C. McAuliffe
rejected a German demand
for surrender, writing “Nuts!”
in his official reply.
On this date:
In 1775, Esek Hopkins
was appointed commander-
in-chief of the Continental
Navy.
In 1894, French army
officer Alfred Dreyfus was
convicted of treason in a
court-martial that triggered
worldwide
charges
of
anti-Semitism. (Dreyfus was
eventually vindicated.)
In 1910, a fire lasting
more than 26 hours broke out
at the Chicago Union Stock
Yards; 21 firefighters were
killed in the collapse of a
burning building.
In 1917, Mother Frances
Xavier Cabrini, who later
became the first naturalized
U.S. citizen to be canonized,
died in Chicago at age 67.
In 1937, the first, center
tube of the Lincoln Tunnel
connecting New York City
and New Jersey beneath the
Hudson River was opened
to traffic. (The second tube
opened in 1945, the third in
1957.)
In 1940, author Nathanael
West, 37, and his wife, Eileen
McKenney, were killed in a
car crash in El Centro, Cali-
fornia, while en route to the
funeral of F. Scott Fitzgerald,
who had died the day before.
In 1968, Julie Nixon
married David Eisenhower
in a private ceremony in New
York.
In 1977, three dozen
people were killed when a
250-foot-high grain elevator
at the Continental Grain
Company plant in Westwego,
Louisiana, exploded.
Today’s
Birthdays:
Actor Hector Elizondo is
81. Country singer Red
Steagall is 79. Former World
Bank Group President Paul
Wolfowitz is 74. Baseball
Hall of Famer Steve Carlton
is 73. Former ABC News
anchor Diane Sawyer is 72.
Rock singer-musician Rick
Nielsen (Cheap Trick) is
69. Rock singer-musician
Michael Bacon is 69. Base-
ball All-Star Steve Garvey
is 69. Golfer Jan Stephenson
is 66. Actress BernNadette
Stanis is 64. Rapper Luther
“Luke” Campbell is 57.
Country
singer-musician
Chuck Mead is 57. Sen.
Ted Cruz, R-Texas, is 47.
Rhythm-and-blues
singer
Jordin Sparks is 28. Pop
singer Meghan Trainor is 24.
Thought for Today:
“Those wearing tolerance for
a label call other views intol-
erable.” — Phyllis McGinley,
American poet and author
(1905-1978).
PHOEBE AND HER UNICORN
BY DANA SIMPSON
BIG NATE
BY LINCOLN PEIRCE