East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, December 06, 2017, Page Page 2A, Image 2

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    WEATHER
East Oregonian
Page 2A
REGIONAL CITIES
Forecast
THURSDAY
TODAY
FRIDAY
Freezing fog this
morning
Freezing fog in the
morning
35° 21°
34° 20°
SATURDAY
Freezing fog in the
morning
Partly sunny and
chilly
PENDLETON TEMPERATURE FORECAST
36° 19°
34° 21°
HERMISTON TEMPERATURE FORECAST
35° 22°
38° 22°
PENDLETON
through 3 p.m. yesterday
TEMPERATURE
HIGH
LOW
42°
41°
66° (1944)
24°
28°
1° (1972)
PRECIPITATION
24 hours ending 3 p.m.
Month to date
Normal month to date
Year to date
Last year to date
Normal year to date
0.00"
0.07"
0.23"
15.33"
11.38"
11.70"
HERMISTON
through 3 p.m. yesterday
LOW
42°
41°
63° (1946)
0.00"
0.01"
0.27"
8.77"
7.95"
8.74"
SUN AND MOON
Dec 17
Bend
39/17
Burns
34/5
7:21 a.m.
4:11 p.m.
7:59 p.m.
10:14 a.m.
First
Full
Dec 26
Jan 1
Caldwell
36/17
Astoria
Baker City
Bend
Brookings
Burns
Enterprise
Eugene
Heppner
Hermiston
John Day
Klamath Falls
La Grande
Meacham
Medford
Newport
North Bend
Ontario
Pasco
Pendleton
Portland
Redmond
Salem
Spokane
Ukiah
Vancouver
Walla Walla
Yakima
Hi
56
39
39
58
34
39
45
36
38
43
41
39
38
48
56
58
35
37
35
47
39
47
32
40
47
34
42
Lo
37
11
17
43
5
20
26
19
22
21
14
20
19
29
39
39
16
22
21
34
12
28
20
17
33
23
23
W
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s
s
NATIONAL WEATHER TODAY
Thu.
Hi
55
39
43
60
33
44
46
37
35
47
42
43
42
49
54
59
32
34
34
48
42
47
34
44
50
34
38
Lo
34
9
19
42
6
25
24
19
22
25
14
22
21
26
38
36
15
22
20
30
12
26
20
18
27
22
21
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
W
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
pc
s
s
pc
s
s
WORLD CITIES
Today
Beijing
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
London
Mexico City
Moscow
Paris
Rome
Seoul
Sydney
Tokyo
Hi
48
72
53
53
74
26
43
56
41
76
51
Lo
26
62
42
48
47
22
32
40
30
64
40
W
s
pc
sh
c
pc
sn
pc
s
pc
t
s
Thu.
Hi
41
73
51
57
74
24
48
58
41
85
52
Lo
22
61
39
35
47
14
37
47
19
67
42
W
s
s
pc
r
pc
c
r
pc
pc
s
pc
WINDS
Medford
48/29
PRECIPITATION
Dec 9
John Day
43/21
Ontario
35/16
20°
29°
1° (2013)
24 hours ending 3 p.m.
Month to date
Normal month to date
Year to date
Last year to date
Normal year to date
Sunrise today
Sunset tonight
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Last
New
Albany
45/27
Eugene
45/26
TEMPERATURE
Yesterday
Normals
Records
34° 22°
Spokane
Wenatchee
32/20
35/23
Tacoma
Moses
48/27
Lake
Pullman
Aberdeen Olympia
Yakima 37/22
37/23
52/37
47/27
42/23
Longview
Kennewick Walla Walla
49/28
34/23 Lewiston
36/22
Astoria
39/23
56/37
Portland
Enterprise
Hermiston
47/34
Pendleton 39/20
The Dalles 38/22
35/21
41/27
La Grande
Salem
39/20
47/28
Corvallis
46/28
HIGH
36° 22°
Seattle
50/34
ALMANAC
Yesterday
Normals
Records
35° 23°
Today
SUNDAY
Fog, freezing early;
chilly
35° 20°
Wednesday, December 6, 2017
Klamath Falls
41/14
(in mph)
Today
Thursday
Boardman
Pendleton
NE 4-8
N 4-8
NE 4-8
N 4-8
UV INDEX TODAY
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.
REGIONAL FORECAST
Coastal Oregon: Mostly sunny today; areas
of fog in central parts in the morning. Clear
tonight.
Eastern and Central Oregon: Mostly sunny
today; freezing fog in the morning across
the north and in central parts.
Western Washington: Mostly sunny today;
areas of fog in the morning. Areas of fog
late tonight.
— Founded Oct. 16, 1875 —
211 S.E. Byers Ave., Pendleton 541-276-2211
333 E. Main St., Hermiston 541-567-6211
Office hours: Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Closed major holidays
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East Oregonian (USPS 164-980) is published daily except Sunday, Monday and
postal holidays, by the EO Media Group, 211 S.E. Byers Ave. Pendleton, OR 97801.
Periodicals postage paid at Pendleton, OR. Postmaster: send address changes to
East Oregonian, 211 S.E. Byers Ave. Pendleton, OR 97801.
Eastern Washington: Areas of freezing fog
in the morning; mostly sunny today.
Cascades: Plenty of sunshine today. Clear
tonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow.
0
1
2
1
0
0
8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
0-2, Low
3-5, Moderate 6-7, High;
8-10, Very High;
11+, Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ num-
ber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Northern California: Sunny today. Clear
tonight. Plenty of sunshine tomorrow.
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2017
Subscriber services:
For mail delivery, online access, vacation stops
or delivery concerns call 1-800-522-0255 ext. 1
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Copyright © 2017, EO Media Group
-10s
-0s
showers t-storms
0s
10s
rain
20s
flurries
30s
40s
snow
ice
50s
60s
cold front
70s
80s
90s
100s
warm front stationary front
110s
high
low
National Summary: Southern California will remain at high risk for rapid fire growth today
as Santa Ana winds howl. Meanwhile, arctic air will expand its grip from the Plains to more
of the East.
Yesterday’s National Extremes: (for the 48 contiguous states)
High 88° in Edinburg, Texas
Low -6° in Climax, Colo.
NATIONAL CITIES
Today
Albuquerque
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Fargo
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Hi
47
48
51
50
37
45
37
51
68
48
36
44
53
38
41
46
27
19
81
47
44
80
45
62
56
77
Lo
25
38
40
32
27
37
19
33
40
27
21
26
39
14
26
31
10
4
62
41
22
53
18
41
32
50
W
s
r
pc
pc
pc
r
s
r
r
s
s
pc
c
pc
pc
sh
sn
pc
pc
r
pc
c
pc
s
s
s
Thur.
Hi
39
52
50
48
48
51
35
45
47
42
30
34
53
39
36
41
26
25
82
50
33
55
33
61
48
79
Lo
22
35
32
26
36
31
18
30
40
20
18
21
30
25
21
22
22
16
67
34
17
45
20
42
22
51
W
s
c
pc
s
pc
c
s
s
r
pc
pc
c
s
c
sf
s
i
pc
s
r
pc
r
pc
s
pc
s
Today
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Portland, ME
Providence
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Tucson
Washington, DC
Wichita
Hi
51
53
85
32
24
51
51
47
55
38
48
74
46
52
53
31
45
60
49
35
73
62
50
71
52
49
Lo
29
33
72
21
10
31
42
38
26
16
37
48
27
31
38
14
18
35
23
19
51
47
34
44
38
20
W
s
pc
pc
pc
c
pc
r
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
c
sn
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s
pc
pc
s
Thur.
Hi
40
46
85
30
24
46
49
47
41
31
48
68
43
47
52
41
48
62
36
37
74
65
50
62
50
35
Lo
20
23
73
18
18
23
36
32
20
19
30
43
24
29
34
31
21
34
20
22
50
46
32
36
34
18
W
pc
c
sh
c
pc
pc
r
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s
c
sn
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain,
sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
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COMMERCIAL PRINTING
Production Manager: Mike Jensen
541-215-0824 • mjensen@eastoregonian.com
Oregon medical marijuana loses Tax overhaul could chill U.S.
foothold to recreational industry affordable housing construction
GILLIAN FLACCUS
Associated Press
DYLAN DARLING
The Register-Guard
EUGENE — A medical
marijuana card used to be the
key to buying and possessing
pot in Oregon.
But the rise of recreational
marijuana is making the
cards primarily valuable
only as a discount card, and
not a necessity to buy, said
Sam Elkington, owner of
Track Town Collective in
Glenwood. The card exempts
the buyer from Oregon’s state
and local pot taxes, which are
levied on recreational pot.
Daily sales at medical pot
dispensaries — once cutting-
edge hubs for the marijuana
industry — have plummeted
as a result.
“Medical only is smaller
than small,” Elkington said
of the dispensary niche. On
Monday at Track Town,
customers had bought just
$58 worth of pot products
by midafternoon, reinforcing
why Elkington so far has been
able to employ only himself at
the store.
Elkington’s little green
pot shop draws about three
medical marijuana customers
a day. Another 15 to 20 poten-
tial customers come in asking
for recreational pot, but he
can’t sell to them — yet.
The rapid growth and
evolution of the marijuana
marketplace in Oregon is
prompting Elkington to apply
with the Oregon Liquor
Control Commission to
become a recreational pot
shop. He plans to let his status
Brian Davies/The Register-Guard via AP
In this Nov. 29 photo, owner Sam Elkington, who
said he plans to switch from a medical marijuana dis-
pensary to a recreational model, works at Track Town
Collective in Springfield.
as a medical pot dispensary
with the Oregon Health
Authority lapse in March.
“It’s a financial decision,”
Elkington said.
He’s not alone in going
recreational.
Medical marijuana card-
holders these days can get
their pot either at a medical pot
store or at a recreational one.
That has put medical mari-
juana stores in an increasingly
untenable financial position.
Nearly a quarter of the
dispensary license holders
with the state — five out of
21 — had notified the state as
of Monday that they plan to
apply with the OLCC to sell
recreational pot rather than
medical marijuana, according
to Oregon Health Authority
spokesman Jonathan Modie.
Only four indicated plans to
remain a medical marijuana
shop.
Dispensary owners faced a
deadline to decide on Friday.
The deadline caused
medical pot stores to submit
a flurry of forms to the OHA
and OLCC. Officials at both
agencies still were sorting
through them on Monday, and
they expected more to come
in throughout the week.
Lane County had 31
medical pot dispensaries
as of April 2015, a couple
of months before the sale
of recreational pot became
legal. As of this year, the
medical-pot dispensary count
had dropped to just two stores.
And the county may have
none next year.
“While, obviously, we’ve
seen a significant drop over
the last year or two in dispen-
saries, patients still have the
option to purchase medical
(marijuana) at recreational
shops,” Modie said.
PORTLAND — Munic-
ipal governments worry
the tax overhaul in Wash-
ington, D.C. could chill the
construction of affordable
housing as homelessness
reaches a crisis point on the
West Coast.
Officials with the housing
authority
in
Portland,
Oregon, said Tuesday the
U.S. could lose nearly 1
million units of affordable
housing over 10 years if
the final bill eliminates the
tax-exempt status for a type
of bond commonly used by
developers to finance afford-
able housing.
That estimate comes
from a recent analysis by
Novogradac & Co., a San
Francisco-based accounting
firm that specializes in
real estate and affordable
housing issues.
While the tax bill is
not finalized, developers
are now racing to lock in
financing and the uncertainty
over the bonds has raised
upfront costs for some proj-
ects, affecting projects from
Oregon to Massachusetts
to Illinois to Minnesota.
The concern comes at a
time when homelessness is
soaring on the West Coast
amid an acute shortage of
affordable housing. Cities,
including Portland, are
rushing to get projects in the
pipeline to address the crisis.
“It’s a little bit of chaos
because there’s so much to
unpack in the implications
of this and folks are scram-
bling,” Michael Buonocore,
executive director of Port-
land’s housing authority, said
in a phone interview. “This
is straightforward math and
it is not just funding for
public housing that is purely
funneled through the govern-
ment. The low-income
tax credit fuels ... private
industry and lenders too, so
it’s across the spectrum.”
In Portland, for example,
uncertainty over the fate of
the private activity bonds
has added $1 million to the
cost of a 240-unit afford-
able housing complex, the
largest that’s been built in
Portland in many years,
Buonocore said. Developers
will nonetheless break
ground in January, but the
fate of future projects is less
certain, he said.
More than half of
affordable housing projects
nationwide rely on a 4
percent tax credit that
can only be claimed by a
developer if at least half of
the construction is financed
by private activity bonds.
The bonds are awarded by
states, with the help of local
governments, for qualifying
projects.
While both House and
Senate versions of the tax
bill currently retain low-in-
come housing tax credits,
the House version would
remove the tax-exempt status
of the private activity bonds,
making them essentially
useless as a financing tool.
The analysis by Novo-
gradac & Co. also estimated
that lowering the corporate
tax rate from 35 percent to
20 percent — a feature of
both the House and Senate
versions of the tax bill —
would effectively devalue
low income housing tax
credits and result in a loss of
investor equity nationally of
about $1.2 billion.
PROPERTIES HERMISTON, LLC
Licensed Oregon Realtors
Two high school students reportedly shot
GRAHAM,
Wash.
(AP) — Authorities say two
students reportedly were
shot outside a high school
south of Seattle in Graham.
The Pierce County Sher-
iff’s Office said Tuesday
that the incident happened
at Graham-Kapowsin High
School.
The sheriff’s office says
one student was found in a
parking lot near a football
field while the other was
found in a locker room.
The sheriff’s office says
both victims were taken
to hospitals. Their condi-
tions weren’t immediately
known.
The sheriff’s office says
the shots reportedly were
fired on the Eustis Hunt
Road side of campus and
male suspects fled in a green
vehicle, possibly a Chevy
Impala.
The sheriff’s office says
deputies checking school
grounds have found no indi-
cations that shooters remain
on campus. All students
still on campus are with
deputies and considered by
authorities to be safe while
investigation continues.
Corrections
The East Oregonian works hard to be accurate and sincerely regrets any errors. If
you notice a mistake in the paper, please call 541-966-0818.
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BOARDMAN: 2 Marine Dr. • 541-481-2888
IRRIGON: 170 Columbia River Hwy • 541-922-2888
HERMISTON: 320 South Hwy 395 • 541-564-0888
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