East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, September 28, 1921, DAILY EDITION, Image 1

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    THE ONLY SMALL DAILY IN AMERICA CARRYING REGULAR WIRE REPORTS FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, UNITED PRESS AND THE LN. S, j
DAILY EDITION
DAILY EDITION
The But Oregonian la Kaitrra 0
on's greatest newspaper and is a Mil
lag force gives to tha adrtliwi ovef
twiea tha guaranteed paid olreulauea
In Pendleton and Umatilla aouatjr of
ay o'uiir newspaper.
This paper 10 menvber or and audited
by the Audit Bureau Of Circulations.
COUNTY OFFICIAL PAFER
t , ... M "i
COUNTY OFFICIAL FAKES
DAILY EAST OREGONIAN, PENDLETON, OREGON, WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 28, 1921
NO. 9942
WAT
' 1 '." - - ' ' ' ' ' '
HAN
ILLICIT LIQUOR
UK DISCOVERED
III NORTHWEST
Officials Predict Sensational
Arrests With Prominent Se
attle Businessmen Involved.
CAUGHT TRANSFERRING
LIQUOR TO AN AUTO
Hobo Observed Operations No
tified Police; Booze Has Been
Moving From Vancouver, B.C
' SEATTLH. Sept. (U. I.) Of
ficial! declare that dfie of the largest
illicit liquor rings ever discovered In
the northwest haa been exposed here.
They predict sensational arrests, with
several prominent Seattle persons in
volved In the coming probe. The de
partment of Justice operatives have
been quietly Investigating- the alleged
ring following four secret indictments
recently of men caught transferring
liquor from the train near Richmond
Beach to an automobile. A hobo ob
served the operations and notified the
police. Further arrests are expected
today. The liquor has been movln
between Vancauvor H. C and Seattle.
TELEPHONE COMPANY
TO BEGIN WORK SOON
El
EXCESSIVE GOVT TAXATION
RESPONSIBLE FORH COST
OF LIVING &A ft AN AMAKER
J
fT-,is Held Down by Taxes
o excessive Sales and In
mes Says Merchant.
. . insa ii 4iiraaaiA I
LOCAL WOMAN dUDMII d j
TO BLOOD TRANSFUSION )
TO BENEFIT FRIEND
Mr. Pnra Iaiib last night gave
from her veins a pint of blood
which was transfused to the body
of Mrs. Elvin Craig, who is se-
rlously ill and who will undergo
an operation. ,
. The blood was taken from
Mrs. Lane's left arm and the'
transfusion lasted for 10 min
utes. Mrs. Lane feels no 111 ef
fects today and Mrs. Craig's
condition Is much Improved. Ef
forts were made repeatedly to
find blood which would blend
with that of Mrs. Craig before It
was found that blood from the
body of Mrs.' Lane would blend.
The transfusion was made In
th9 presence of a number of doc
tors ana nurses at St. Anthony's
hospital.
NBW YORK, Sept. 28. (U. P.)
John Wanamaker charged today that
excessive government taxation Is
largely responsible for the continued
high cost of living. He told the Unit
ed press retailers were unable to make
I further reductions or commonly
el prices until the taxation burden is
lightened. Manufacturers and whoie
salers must set the pace for the re
tailers. "The government holds down
business by taxes on excessive sales
and taxes on Income." said the veter
an merchant. 'These things make
dull time for business because the
public was was waiting until the gov
ernment took off these excessive war
time charges." .
TO BE CONTINUED IN
Budget Committee Appointed to
Organize Business End of
Organization; growth Shown
Two New Sections Switchboard
Arrive and Will be Installed
Along With Poles and Cable
The Paclflo Telephone and Tele
aranh Company will shortly begin
work on a project designed to supply
certain seotlons of Pendleton with nec
essary additional facilities. There are
various parts of the city where for
some time It haa been difficult to sup
ply telephone service due to the con
gested condition of the cables serving
these, sections. The contemplated
work; will Involve an expenditure of
approximately $30,000 and conslstB of
placing 90 poles and stringing 5.3
miles of aerial cable containing a to
tal of 1210 miles of wire. This pro
ject la a part of the telephone com
nsnv'a oeneral Plan for providing Pen-
dloton -with ample plant facilities for
the next two or three years.
Recently the telephone company ac
quired property In Pendleton upon
which a new central office building
will he constructed. intimately the
outside plant work shortly to be un
dertaken will work Into the general
plan for re-centerlng the outside plant
at the new central office location. The
present construction work Is only the
forerunner of a large amount of ad
ditional work planned for Pendleton In
order to provide necessary telephone
facilities in this fast growing city.
WOULD PROVE THAT MRS.
MAHONEY WAS ALIVE ON
SIXTEENTH OF APRIL
SEATTLE, Sept. 28. (U. P.) L
B. Schwellenbach, assistant defense
con nf el for James Mahoney, on trial
for the murder of his wife, said the
defense would prove the woman in the
morgue said to be Mrs. Kate Mahoney
was not Mrs. Mahoney at all am' that
Mrs. Mahoney was alive after April
when the state contends the assert
bride met her death, wnweiionniicn
made this statement followmr ine
state's resting the case today.
A decision to carry on the work of
the Eastern Oregon Auto Club during
the winter months when traffic is al
ways of slighter volume was rracntu
last night at A membership meeting or
the organisation. The dec slon was
made after the report or me execu
tive secretory. B. I Crockatt, had
been made showing tjie need of work
In preparation for the season of 1S22.
In order to organise the business
efforts of the club Is an effective
manner a. budget committee consist
ing, of Hoy W. Rttner, iEd Murphy and
O. F. Steel was named. This commit
tee will worki with president Dav'd
H. Kelson, the secretary and L. I
Rogers, chairman of the committee on
finance In determining the amount of
money which will be distributed to va
rious branches of the activities.
The present membership of the club
is 162. the report of tne secretary
showed, an Increase of 123 since April
It Is expected that this membersmp
will be doubled In 1922. .
That more than one-half of .the
population of the country "Is now on
wheels," was the statement of Secre
tary Crockatt in his report. An Indi
cation of the Importance of auto traf
fic was given when he declared tnst
there were 10 visitors 10 una i
niirwi.iln who came by motor to one
that came by rail. Two years ago,
there were more who came by railroad
than by autos. Crockatt said.
He also called attention to stnt'stlcs
on money spent by tourists. In Cali
fornia last year, estimates have it that
tourists left 390,000,000, and during
the same period In Oregon, only 11.
OOO.OflO was secured by the state from
visitors motoring through. The dif
ference Ib largely accounted for by the
superiority ,of tho California highways,
according to the speaker.
Members of the cIuti who operate
service stations declared that the
benefits derived by the organization
this year have made It a necessity that
must be maintained on an even more
effective scale as auto traffic increases.
DRIB.
OPENS OFFICE IN CITY
Dr. O. B. Garrison, formerly a mem
ber of the faculty of the Washington
University Medical Snjiool. and : asso
ciated wllb' the "Barnes Hospital. St.
Iouis and the St. Louis Ch Idren's
hospital. Is a new member of the med
ical fraternity of Pendleton. Dr. Gar
rlson arrived here Monday and open
ed offices yesterday in the Bond build
ing. Dr. Garrison, after being graduated
from Washington I silversity Medical
School, became a member of the army
medical corps and served at Panama
and Fort Rellly as a f rst lieutenant.
He specialises in medicine and surgery.
Dr. Garrison Is a brother or .Mrs.
Roy Rew of this city and will make
his home with her.
L BE HELD
OiJ SOME CHAROE
Arbuckle's Fate Will Probably
be Determined Before End of
Preliminary Hearing Today.
JUDGE REFUSES DEFENSE.
MOTION FOR DISMISSAL
Did Not Say Whether Fatty
Would be Held on Manslau
. .ghter or First Degree Murder
TEN ATIVE PLANS FOR
CONSOLIDATIONS OF
RAILROADS AREMADE
Interstate Commission Announ
ced Proposed Consolidation
' Under Transportation Act.
SAX FRANCISCO, Sept 2R. (V.
P.) Arbuckle's fate will probably be
determined berore the end of the pre-1
liminary hearing today. Judge Laa-
rus, in refusing the defense's motion
for dism'ssal, indicated he would hold
Arbuckle on some charge, but did not
Indicate whether it would be man
slaughter or first degree murder.
Lazarus deplored the absence of Mrs.
Delmont, "the avenger' from the
stand. He intimated he would like
more evidence showing the comedian's
guilt. The defense expected to
strengthen their ease through the tes
timony of Fred Fishback, and another
physician.
KXFXITIVK COMMITTEE
APIOIXTEI.
PORTLAND. Sept. 28. (A.' P.)
The executive committee of 39 from
all parts of the state to .direct me
1925 exposition announced by Chair
man Meier, includes O. P. Coshow of
Roseburg; A. T. Hill of La Grande;
Pert Hall of Klamath Falls; W. W.
Harrah'of Pendleton; C. E. Ingalls of
Corvallis: Dorsey Kieitxer of Mart,
field and B. P. Stone of Astoria.
Experts of the interstate commerce
commission, proposing a consolidation
of railroads Into 19 competitive sys
tems, declared a rate reduction and
general rehabilitation would result as
well as huge savings ;n operating ex
penses. The commission believes bank
ruptcy which many of the small roadi
face might be averted by consolida
tion. Congress, realizing the import
ance of such consolidation to '.h na
tion, made the provision in the Esch
Cummlns law for such an action,
leaving It to the discretion of r'.ie In
terstate commerce commlBsio i. Some
commission experts hold only by such
consolidation can railroads hit the pre
war levels within the next ten years.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 28. (A. P.)
The interstate commerce commis
sion anounced today tentative plans
for the consolidation of all major rail
roads into 19 systems. They gave no
tice that the hearings would be called
on the project in the near future. The
proposed consolidation was authoriz
ed under the transportation act. In
the main the plan is that drafted by
Professor William Z. Ripley, of Har
vard rnivers'ty. The commission said
that while all of the larger railroads
had been included, a number of clws
two and class three lines have also
been coveed.
ZURCHER TO DISCUSS
M'KAY PROJECT BEFORE
MEMBERS AT LUNCHEON
!VE
GERMAN GOV! REGARDS
TREATY AS UNWORKABLE
The McKay Project will be the
subject and J. D. Zurcher of
Stanfield, president of the coun
ty federation of commercial or
ganizations, the principal speak
er at the weekly forum luncheon
of the Pendleton Commercial
Association which will be held
tomorrow at noon at Jolly Inn.
The )uncheon: wlll start
promptly at 12 o'clock, and the
meeting will end by 1:15. Res
ervations for tickets should be
made as quickly as possible by
calling the office of the associa
tion, 114. W. H. Bennett, a
member of the arrangements
committee, will preside at to
morrow's session. ,
$1,100 CASH PRIZES
October 7 and 8 Are Dates
Chosen for Exhibit; Sports
to Occupy Place on Program
1NDIAXAPOLI3, Ind., Sept. 28.
(U.- P. ) The- Insurgent miners were
severe! v drubbed by the administra
tlon forces in a conference vote at the an(l gwin?
With 11100 offered In cash prem
iums and a program both instructive
and entertaining scheduled, the Her
miston Dairy and Hog Show, October
7 and 8, gives promise of being one
of the best exhibitions in Oregon.
The program for the two days Is as
follows: '
Friday.
:45-T;iys' and gljls stock Judging.
'5:00 r-nrade to the grounds.
10:00 Judging of dairy cattle
FO!
Material for this work has already
begun to arrive, Manager John Mur
ray declared this morning. Two more
sections of switchboards have arrived
and will bs Installed within a few days.
Ohe section will be for long distance
and -the other for local. There are
already 10 sections In use and the In
stallation of the two additional sec
tions will providemeven for local work
and five for long distance service.
INVESTIGATION TO CONTINVK
SEATTLE, Wash., Sept. 28. (I.
P.)A probe Into the alleged brutality
end inefficiency in connection with
the state Insane asylums will he re-
snmpd tomorrow, Robert Hesketh,
chairman of the committee of citizens
which Governor Hart appointed to In
vestigate conditions, annonncen.
TACOMA. Sept. 28. (IT. P.) Judge
George Re'd branded as "mawkish
sentimentality" the petitions to be cir
culated here asking President Hard
ing to pardon Roy Gardner so he can
return to his wife and baby. Reid
characterizes Gardner as a dangerous
mail robber who belongs behind the
bars. He does not believe aiiy presi-
den
an appeal.
'WASHINGTON. Sept. 28. (U. P.)
Berlin reports that the -German
government regards the peace treaty
with the United States as "unwork
able' and "full of holes." This re
port may be used by the treaty oppo
nents to block its ratification by the
seiuite. Senator Eorah announced. , 1
Democrats Hold Whip ITanrt. ;
WASHINGTON. Sept. 28. (U. PA j
Republican leaders decided to aban-
don their real efforts to secure tne
senatorial approval to tho German ,
treaty pend'ng the formation of a vig
orous ratification drive. Thirty-s:x
democratic senators admittedly hold
the whip hand.
United Mine Workers international
convention today. Certain members
of the convention would support Pres
ident John U Lewis and the executive
board in their demand that Alexande
Howat. the insurgent Kansas leader,
reverse himself and stop two outlaw
strikes in his district
All but five states and the Distr'ct
of Columbia have enacted legislation
beneficial to veterans.
CHEMISTS DAY ?
lESnFYIlJII.;
SOUTHARD'S CASE
Alleged Feminine Bluebeard
Accused of Taking Arsenic
Poison From Flypaper
IS VISIBLY NERVOUS ,
DURING THE TESTIMONY
Mrs. Southard Expressed Belief
She is Typhoid Carrier as
Husband Die of That Disease
10:30 Dress form .demonstration.
11:45 Greased pig race. .
1:00 Judging continued.
3:00 Foot races. '
3:45 Throwing football for distance.
4:00 Football game.
7:15 and 9:00 All star cast in "The
Boomerang" at the Play 'House. '
Saturday Pendleton Day.
9:30 Judging of horses.
f:00 Judging of women's exhibits.
1:00 Live stock parade.
1:30 Pulling contests. .
4:00 Horso races.
7:15 and 9:00 Lon Chaney. In. "The
"Penalty" at the Play House.
I Sports will occupy an important
place in the program. The prizes and
the events include the pulling con
tests, with two prizes of $15 each;
football game, purse $25; greased pig
race, $7.50; 100 yard dash, men 38;
100 yard dash, boys $5; football throw.
Imerchandse prize; and prizes, 312
and $8 for each of two horse races.
Prize List Extensive.
The prize l!st for dairy cattle is as
' TWIN FALLS, Ida., Bept. ?. tU,
P.) Chemists today are testifying' for
both sides concerning the contents ot
the flypaper from which Mrs. South
ard is accused of taking arsenic pois-"
onlng with which she Is alleged to bar
caused the death of her fourth hus
band, Edward Meyer. Mrs. Southard
was visibly nervous during the testi
mony. ... . - . - . '
The original venire of 7$ men wcr
exhausted yesterday and 40 more mrf
called for examination whe,n the court
opened today. .
- The state's Initial testimony ja
pected to be introduced Thursday and'
will include that of physicians who St-
tended Meyer during lis fatal lllnsssv.'
They will recount how Meyer reache4 ,
Twin Falls In the grip of a mysterious
malady, apparently- ptomaine poison-,
ing. He began to recover and physl-
cians told his wife to dismiss the nuras '
Meyers then suffered a relapse, from
which he died. Typhoid was given as
the cause of his death, according to
the testimony to be brought out by the '
state. Mrs. Southard has expressed- '
thai! she is a typhoid carrier because ;
of the deartv at he huiUaafwn."
that disease. The state, will attempt',,
to disprove the typhoid theory; whil j :
the defense probably will base Its 4er
fense upon bacteriologists diagnosis of,
Mayer's malady as that disease..
BY FIRE AT EARLY HOUR ;
Blaze is Thought to Eats
Originated , in the . Orens
of City Bakery Booms,
CATTIJl MARKET IS STEADY.
PORTLAND. Sept. 28. (A. P.)
Cattle are steady. Hogs have a weak
undertone, top 65 cents lower, prime
t would waste five seconds on such light, $10.50 to $lt. bheep are slon.
him Diiuer aie iinii
CHINA IS NOT OVERLOOKING ANY BETS.
WSPAPER URGES ROY TO PROVE HE
E
IS THOROUGHBRED AND RETURN TO PRISON
PRE
TO
BE DEI
SAJ FRANCISCO, Sept. 2. (A.
r.) Mrs. Dolly Gardner, wife of Roy
Gardner published a letter In the San
uvonpieeo Bulletin today addressed to
Rod Oardner, "somewhere," asking
him to return to prison. The letter
said; "Dear Roy In your letter to
President naming - t-vvnrtv. ... 28.-(A. P.)-
ended your criminal cu e. . -- r,,, to r
Vou really mean this go Daes to scntu . rrn.. ""',"'""' , " ,hl.
Island. You cannot be a hunted man Valera. In which he Is to Invite Jlu
an0n?ead an honorable life. Sinn Fein lea era o the c feren e in
u.rinr and everyone yot. ."'u" m v.v...... . . -
liitlftnt.
are the man I have always sam yuu
were. Most anyone can be taken
back, but It takes a Roy Gardner and a
thoroughbred to go back of his own
accord and take his chances with the
Th law renders your friends
powerless to help you under present
circumstances. Roy, do this one thing ,
r.. mv ink a and little Jean & I wi
to do tne oesi inn.it -'. ..,, M , ,h. .rmnment con
TninK tnis ovrr encmi umrn.-
foronce Wi 1 prooaniy oe nriu
self government within the empire will
nnt h issued today as was expected.
N"o hitch developed but the premier
decided to wait another day to give all
the members of the cabinet an oppor
tunity to pass on the draft.
SMRRTriAN DEIjBGATKS MEET.
ivsiniv-!Tnf. Bent. 28. (A. P.)
n.i m, firr mepL'na- of the four Am
1 IIMfc IB l,w ...... -
hv t ask this of you.
next
CHICAGO, Sept. 28. (U P.)
Railroad executives scout the idea of
a general strike. They admit the men
niav vote a strike but believe the wiser
judgment of union leaders w.ll prevent!
an actual walkout.
w n stnrAv nf tVi Runta Fe
pointed out the fact that the men will 'ollowa
recognize the fact that they are deal-1
ing with the government in reiusing
to accept the ranroaa Doaro s wage ,,:,!. t. I nsted in the ovens of the City Bakery
1 je; roum, ana wnen aincuvertta iuoui uii
I Herd of three heifers. 12 to SO I an hour after midnight the whole
'months, 1st J15; 2nd 10. room was afire. A strong wind coming
i Rest cow 30 months and up 1st '"" wes' caused, It to spread
l10- "nd J3 " ' ' Quickly, despite the stiff fight that was
I Pes"t heifer 12 to 30 months 1st made by the fire department under the
Best bull 1 year and up, 1st (10;
2nd $5.
Herd of three cows, SO months and
(East Oregonian Special.)
HERMISTOX, Sept. 28. -Peopl of
Hermiston were engaged In getting the
smoke out of their eyes today as a re;
suit of the big fire which burned for
an hour and one-half early. this morn
Ing in the main business section of the
town, causing a loss roundly estimat
ed at about $15,000. ,
The blaze is thought to have orlgl-
cut. "The government and not
roads, made the cut, said Storey.
the ;
JS; 2nd 4.
Champion cow or heifer $5.
.i;ik contest 1st S20;2nd 113;
110; 4th (5.
lrizjs for Swine..,
For swine, the' prizes are:
Class 1 Duroc Jersey:
Best boar 1 year and over, 1st
2nd 2; 3rd $1.
Best boar under 1 year 1st la;
$3: 3rd $1.
Pet sow 1 year and over 1st Jo;
2nd $3; 3rd 1.
Best sow under 1 year 1st $5; 2nd
13: 3rd tl.
3rd
$5:
-1st $5;
Class 11 Poland China:
Best boar 1 year and over
2nd J3: 3rd $1.
Pest boar under 1 year 1st 5; Ind
3; 3rd $1.
Bast sow 1 year and over 1st $3;
I'n.l 13: 3rd II."
Special Premiums:
Grand champion boar Ribbon.
Grand champion sow Ribbon.
Best sow and litter farrowed under
ten week!) 1st S6; 2nd $4.
4 Hogs, either sex, any age, the get
of one sire First $: 2nd S4; 3rd $2.
4 Hogs, either sex, any age, the
jProuix e vi one now r n m, o, uu i,
3rd J2. -
Hoi-ses New Feature.
A new feature this'year will be the
prizes for horses. The list is as follows:
Best farm team First J10; 2nd ,15.
Pest brood mare with foal by side
F rst Sin; 2nd 5.
Best sucking colt First $8; 2nd 14.
Pest colt. S years First $8: 2nd $4.
Best colt. 2 ars First 8; 2nd $4.
Best colt. 1 year First 8; 2nd $4.
In addition there will be prizes for
:iarm produce lor ooys inn gins emu
work, school Industrial work and wo
men's work.
leadership of E. I.Putnam.
The bakery is owned by W. O.
Sutherland and the' owner of the
building is Dr. i P. Adams. From this
building the flames spread to the bar
ber shop owned by Bert Muilln. E. frV
Dodd's real estate office, the law of
fice of V. J. Warner and William
Shaar's barber shop were also dansag
2nd
u, , Rum RnsrAra ahnu stnrs and his stuck
I today are that he was the heaviest los
' er. All of the buildings were prao-
. tically destroyed. The building ol tne
First National Bank, which Is of con
crete construction, was slightly dam
aged. "
No plans for rebuilding have been
announced. 5
THE WEATHER
Reported by Major Lee Moorhouss,
weather observer. " ;
Maximum. 4.
Minimum, 4. , ., j
Barometer. 29.70. f
IF
PORTLAND ViriT MARKET.
PORTLAND. Sept. 18. (A. P.)
Wheat is 1.0 to 11.11.
Ml
TODAY'S
FORECAST
1
- Tonight nd
Thutsdsir Clr.
hut do not let others think for you.
week (or consultation.
Lovingly. Doily."