East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, August 16, 1921, DAILY EDITION, Page PAGE FOUR, Image 4

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DAILY EAST OREGOMAN, PENDLETON, OREGON,
TUESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 16, 1921.
TO PAG23 "
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER.
raMlsha pI)f end ml-Wrtklr, et
i'naiKtn, Oregon, tf the
It ACT OREUORN1AN 1'UBL.ISHINCI ca
t"Ml t (h po.it office t Pendln
nn, Orecott, u itciMid cises mall anat
, ON IALE IN OTHER CITIES
fmaerltl Hotel New Stsnd, rortland.
ON VI LB AT
Chiryfn Bureau, 0 Security Building
Wwhinfion, 1. c, Bureau 601 Four
teenth Street, N. W.
Mem ker ml the AsMrtstee' Press.
Tha Aaaociated press la excluaively
Mitltied to the uaa for republication of
11 Bewi dlapalchea credited to it or
toot olherwlre credited In this paper and
ia tha local newa published herein. Telephona .
DESCRIPTION RATE!
flN ADVANCE)
Dally, one year, by mall .
Daily, six months, by mail
Daily, three months, by null
Dally, one month by mail
Daily, on year by carrier .
Daily, six montha by carrier
Dally, threa montha by carrier
Daily, one month, by carrier
Semi-Weekly, I year by mall ,
Semi-Week ly. alx montha bv mall
S(ml-Weekly, three montha by mall .11
-IH
- 1.00
. 7.6
. S.7
. i.s
to
EX1UCJ1ED
rr
XiOtiklni; back. It acorns to ma
AH tha griefs whk-h had to be
lft ma, when the pain was o'er,
Klw than I'd been before, '
And by every hurt and blow
I ean face the world today
In a blKcer, kindlier 'way.
Pleasure doesn't make the man,
IJfe requires a sterner plan.
Ha whO"Jiever knows St cAre
Never learna what he can bear,
I la who never sheda a tear
Never Uvea through days of fear.
Has no courape he can show
Whan the winds of winter blow.
(Copyright, 1921, by Edgar A. Guest.)
. SECRET DIPLOMACY
When the nights were dark and bleak
Ana in vain I d strive to seek
Reason for my bitter grief, .
When I faltered In belief.
Utile did I think or know
I should find it better so; .
But today I've come to see
What those sorrows meant to me.
I am richer by the tears '
I have shed In earlier years;
i am nappier each morn
For the burdens I have borne:
And for what awaits me yet,
By the trials I have met
I am stronger, for I know
What it means to bear a blow.
fTHHAT it makes a difference which "foot the shoe is on" is il-
Justrated in the following editorial from the New York
World in commenting on the attitude of Senator Hiram
Jonnson toward the diplomacy of the Hardinir administration
: Hiram Johnson, according to reports from Washington, is
an net up because he cannot learn something about the sep
arate peace negotiations that the Harding administration is con
ducting with the German government
, Surely the senator from California does not intend to make
a fuss about a little thing like that. To be sure, there is a com
plete absence of information as to the nature and scope of these
negotiations. In fact, the state department has never publicly
admitted that it had submitted proposals to Berlin, but that is
neither here nor there. Secret diplomacy is a vice of democrat
ic administrations. It cannot happen under a republican admin
istration, and if it happens it is not secret diplomacy. '
. It is necessary that a democratic president be compelled to
carry on all foreign relations publicly in Lafayette Square to the
accompaniment of the Marine band in order that the populace
may know exactly what is going on at every slep in the proceed
ing, but when a republican president is in office concessions
must be made to the ordinary amenities of diplomacy.
., Hiram Johnson in due time will find out about the treaty
with Germany. Mr. Harding will submit it to the senate and
point out the dotted line on which the senate is to sign. And the
senate will sign, because Mr. Harding is a republican and the
senate is republican.. Its concern about open diplomacy appliet
only to democrats.
Pearl White's Latest ,
Jg - - j u
ta jw w, nth .KiairWa vJSm
Pearl While is shown with Robert Elliott in a scene from "A Vl-i!-'
Paradii," ber new Fox Aituv. It's a story contragtjiiS the Jungle ,td ,
. civtluscd hypocrisy. - i .'..'.'' ' f '
s , . . . ." : ' r" s. .1' i: ' -
SUFFRAGE LEADER HOLDS MOST MEN .
ARE NEGLIGIBLE ENTITIES AT BEST
TV2SIAN RELIEF CONDITIONS
5
LENIN'S appeal for famine relief js cleverly phrased. It
shows that the dictatorship does not rorget political effect
even in the face of the appalling possibilities of the Volga
famine. It is, therefore, a warning to us to see to it that the
bolshevik organization does not misapply American r ?lief.
. Lenin's appeal suggests that he may pass off this relief as a
spontaneous contribution of proletarian sympathizers and as en
couraging evidence of the growth of communist sentiment
abroad. With the Russian press dominated or suppressed he
can put forth any distortion of the fact and with hia ethics
would not hesitate to do bo, . We may be sure the bolshevik gov
ernment will appropriate as much of the credit for relief as it
can get away with. If the peasants can be made to believe that
the Lenin regime has been able to get aid from the "oppressed
masses" of capitalist America and Europe, bolshevism will
strengthen its waning prestige.
' WtHiave-i6o-fo consider that the bolshevik policy has been
and is to take care of bolshevists, not of anti-bolshevists. It is
probable that attempts will be made to appropriate American
relief to the use of the bolshevik regime and to filling bolshevik
stomachs. The starving are likely to be helped in proportion
to the favor in which they are held by the dictatorship.
it may te diflicult to prevent misinterpretation and misuse
of American relief, for the Lenin regime is still in control of
Russia. But what conditions and safeguards are practicable
ahould be set up and maintained. Lenin has been compelled to
appeal for aid. He would not have appealed unless the situa
tion was desperate. It should be possible, therefore, to insist
upon and enforce proper conditions of distribution. Chicago
Tribune. , .
By H. K. REYNOLDS,
International News Service Staff
Correspondent,
WASHINGTON, Aug. 18. "There
is no reason why a man can't learn to
sew. knit, darn and cook, if women
have lamed to practice law, medicine
and other professions hitherto monop
olized by men," says Mrs. Edna I
Johnston, prominent suffrage leader
nd welfare worker, who believes that
he husband of the future will be a.
model seamstress and housekeeper, in
addition to holding a regular job.
Mrs. Johnston, who was congres
sional chairman of the Equal Suffrage
Association of New Hampshire and
was manager of the first United States
employment offjee opened in New
York. City during the war, holds that
accomplishment is not a matter of sex
or dependent upon it, but a matter of
qualification regardless of sex. She
pictures the future husband as mak
ing tha baby's clothes, cooking, wasti
ng, ironing and doing the family!
mendin? right along with his wife.
"The men surely do not want to let
the women get ahead of them in the
matter of accomplishments." Mrs.
Johnston suggests, '"and if they as
sume the attitude of the average map
that Ihey should stick lo What .bap
been hitherto considered man's work,
while the women go ahead and learn
theirs, .too, that would surely happen.
"But I am happy to say that this Is
not happening. The men are learn
ing the domestic arts. Not infrequent
ly do we hear of mer designers, cooks,
etc.. and they are doing this in addi
tion tQ their regular men's work,"
MHn Often Negative.
Mrs. Johnston pointed to the fact
that one man, Charles F. Champlin, of
Chicago, went into a bread baking
contest with forty-five women at the
Evanston (111.) county fair and carried
away the first . prize,, while nearly
every town has its firemen who are
accomplished iij the arts of knitting
and embroidering.
'The division of work into m.ucu
ine and feminine is a matter of tra
dition," the suffrage leader continued.
"Because men have always been engi
neers or electricians, and women
mothers, stenographers or housekeep-
women have pronounced positive qual
ities and men negatives, it not infre
quently happens that their talents
and qualifications are reversed despite
the traditional division of work.
"Thus we have women lawyers, wo
men politicians, women bankers and
men artists, sculptors, designers, and
so on down the list. And sometimes
one hears of a woman stevedore, and
the like. . During the war many wom
en took Up these occupations as a pat
riotic service, I realize, of course.
, "In soma marriages the woman in
the man of the house, it . has ' been
said. She is the positive and respon
sible person, and the man is the neg
ative and dependent.
"In a certain court case, in fact, the
wife was adjudicated to be the man
of the family because she was prov
en to be the head of the house. And
the child, a boy about whose custody
a legal contest arose, was given over
to the custody of the mother." -
' Mrs Johnston is superintendent of
the house- of detention here, and, she
often wonders, she says, why the boys
there can't be taught to sew and do
the same things as girls,'! , ,
N,
r '
it
'
h...
WHY WE MAKE A SEPARATE
Charge for Alterations
FIRST So we can sell.. ihe, garment for.lws il.iw.qhiinge,ia.neej(lefi,
SECOND We can give you 'better workmanship if aii' alteration r'fcecV
essaiy. All stores charge for alterations. The better' hoiises admit itsome
stores try to deny it. Fitters, tailors or pressers do not work for nothing, pad
ding and trimmings all cost money. All these .ejcpenseshavejo be covered, (
OUR VAY--THE ONLY FAIR .
it is done in two different
, ' ways
The price is added when the gar
ment is marked or a separate charge
is made when the garment is sold. -
r4
,- . '.. WAY., -:. -
You save ttioney if art alteration Is'
unnecessary-' You don't have to pay
for something you do not get. .. You
get better workmanship and. better
satisfaction. i " :. .- '-:'y!
PRICE 'Our new fall -coats, ; I ; '
"'feUITS AND iRE6SES"rr v' :-" -V'-' : - '
and the low prices will tell you we : - v
' have to . . . V ";';';'''
- CHARGE FOR ALTERATIONS '
Phone 127 for Quick
' Delivery Service
Better Merchandise
for Less Moneyl
Ruins of an ammunition factor?', in
which stone axes were made for war
fare six thousand years ago, have been
dug up In Wales. ;
28 YEARS AGO
(From
the Daily East Qregonian,
August 16, 1833.) .
Young Robert Fletcher had a some
what dangerous experience .( Tuesday
night, Work to rearrange the tele
phone exchange on aqcount of Qffh'e
rento'val has been actively pushed, and
all night the boys were busy w-ith their
task. On top of a telephone pole
they had a fifty candle power incades
cent lamp to furnish light, and while
holding this Robin connected himself
in w)me Way with an arc circuit wire
ers, some still think the division of i end received a tremendous dose - of
work should be sustained. Why con-1 electrleity, rendering ini unennsctpus.
tinue this. foolish -.custom? -- - jWs'irae' ranelod-lif) In the Vires' and
"It is the medical opinion that if ! cross beams In such a way a to escap
How Tqu
Get Thin
TcVxcoavttlrndet
or rtduc your
' wight,iinplytl
those deligntful
lirrl 1fnrin Tab
ules u directed. ' Nc need p "(
Voutself sn4na danger. ' The shsdow
psrt vi thU picture. hcw bow f mkef
tone women lovk old and vfly
dincetout to b nvrnrout, tnd s
to get thin, vou should et I bo ct
Ko'reiiTbuUs and bffineducigiiol
WiiM fcr htt book wk.es Usu Ai i"
wr Kow !, s,ni r4 h 17
Miwiuk AJiff Kocia KM-
KOREIN tabule sr dupemed h fhi
cur bf all food dfufV iPfiuolM
A. C. KoeppeiJ Eros, Pharmacy-
a fall, and finally recovered his senses,
l,ut "Bob" wil hereafter have a feeling
of sympathy for the criminal Who dies
in an electric chair. ..
' Mr. and Mrs. S- I Morse left on last
evening's., train for Portland; where
they wil) visit friends and remain un
til after the raced. Miss flora Morse
Is still at the sea coast.
, fi. p. Iloosevet returned this after
noon ovqp the .?'orthern. Paclflq' from
a vlKit tQ-.bis hpme; t;Ac)c"lc',.Ia,, and
the great world's exposition,' Clyde
Beach, being relieved of his (duties at
the Huston store hy Mjr. Roosevelt's
Yenrrrc BtaTted-thlirmarnlngon a Chl
icago trip. ;j,r ,i ''" '
Peaches for Gannin ( 4
Now is the time for you to get your Canning
Peaches. y ; j ,
CRAWT0RDS AND ELBERTAS AT $U0
' , PER CRATE. .. , . . V'v.;
APRICOTS, BARTLETT PEARS, PRUNES,
PLUMS, NECTARINES, r j ,
CANTALOUPES 5c
HENS AND FRIES ALL THE TIME.
MEDICAL PROFESSION IS
PUZZLED BY RECOVERY
OF GIRL FROM LOCKJAW
COLUMBUS, O.. Aug. 1 .(!. N. S.)
Qiven up to die, a victim of the hor
rlhla and dealy tetanus, or lockjaw,
Nina Helen, five year old daughter of
iir, and Mrs. Henry Jf. Arnold, of this
City, lias completely recovered and
her recovery is exciting commtut in
medical and fuilh healing circles.
Friends of lr. G. K. itobblns, pas
tor of Memorial llaptist church, who
claims to hsve many remarkable cures
by faith to his credit, assert the child
recovered through his prayers at her
bedside.
Her hyaloian, while not willing ta
rtidgrne the broad claims, admits li
U surprised at her recovery. He had
one (Urn up hr rM as hopelecs,
IhiI roHliiiued in uttendanre, and his
SET A
6000
CHIP
prescribed treatment
followed.
was carefully
For several days the child suffered
convulsions at intervals of about fif
ten minutes, fc'he could not lis down
but had to sit propped up In a chair
to avoid stiffening out of her body,
After twelve days of paroxysms the
child relaxed and her jaws unlocked.
Boils, due to the infection of her blood,
followed, but she has now completely
recovered. '
The physician frankly says that he
i$ unable to explain her recovery.
"Whether it was the treatment of
prayer, I am unable to say," he de
clared. "I am greatly astonished."
A committee of the medical associ
atum is making an investigation of
the case with a view to a report to the
general body. - -
ON HEUTH
Look etui tor the usaatural week
tirss that Indicates thiiiaing of th?
lUi and lark of power. It means
tkat jour bodilr organs are starving
f, want of fowl noumliment; thai
h red eefpuerlri era f'wer, ya'T'a'
aemandt ef health. Hood ' Karsa
MriJla xncrcMi atrtnh of the deli
ta ! nerveua, rutores ud "f
fvtch. askt the Hpo4 tarry hs!th
vr,T j .l weatea aa appetite.
If mo ct9 a fcoJ ralnarlifl.BitU
POLICE ARE SEARCHING
FOR NEGRO KIDNAPPERS
'AN'NIBTON. Ala., Aug. (U. P.)
Military and police authorities i
beadjng pf. searcbii'ig for thi
bacroes whs kulnaP4 - Mrs. Gall
frtormer ss she strolled through the
streets with her husband. Etormer,
tralatnf ''1th the Alabama national
ura at Csn McClsllaa. told the eie
lice the negroes leaped from an auto
mobile. arua'hed his wife, from ilia
D0IN03 Qf TOE PDTF3 WILBUR ALWAYS WANTS A REASON. y-rWmMM
iL. . . ' " , . ' , m j i ' ' -juL-iii 1 1 1 ii . 1 1 ,' -1 i Tr 'i ; L- ' 1 1 '-' 11
Y WE'LL NEVER t&jM&m, 1
ABit TO BEAT .. slfte fmr
I . ' '. '. . ' 1
L - Siteiaf. i. ,.o. WWLM;
THAT PAIL AN P - ' ' & '',,'r . -
START f5AlLIMG TH DON'T BELONG TO (;v
. , I ,!ol AW, WHAT DOV0O US AHp Wtl MUST lr,
0UT.THI5 WATER. wANT TO BAIi, puT )T BACK' .-f'
i
THE TABLE SUPPLY
Phone
739! Main' Street
187
: "Peridletbi)
CHA5. D. DESPAIN A CHAS, W. C0ODYEAR
' Proprietors .
QuaHty PRINTING at Reasonable Pricey
feast Oregonian Printing Pepa4mcnt,vxr
FIRESTONE
MOST Mi L E S P E R DOLLAR t
0 the great &tmy of car owners who confi- ;!
dtjntly look to Firestone' for economy and h
protection in tires, most miles ber dollar i
. stands as the guardian of valuel '-' ; :.. '
. r."f.'3;.'V?f':.'V ; ' ;-' ' .v '
Twenty years ago It meant "intent .' The Fire- .
stone Organization pledged Itself to work to this
high standard. Today there are two decades of
experience and millions in resources back of it.
That is why good dealers offer you Fifestones
with such sincere endorsement They know that ,
the name these tires carry the signature of the
active head of the organization which builds them
is the sapst guarantee of mileage you can ask.
Simpson-Sturgis
For Service Phone 651
V.i,
PendletoiuOre. 223 E. Court St.
; r; ,; . : Golden Rule. PotplBiiiaing v.; -
I'M
lie aid C;ov8 SiU
I er in - . 1 ' - ai