East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, July 02, 1921, DAILY EDITION, Page PAGE FOUR, Image 4

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    TWELVE PAGES
DAILY EAST OREGONIAfT, PENDLETON, OREGON, SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 2, 1021.
reftonian)
AN IKDE.EKDENT.-NEWSt'APER.
PubllihM Pally and Pcml-Werkljr, at
Pendleton, Oron, by tha
AST OUKOONIAN PUBLISHING CO.
Entrrrd at tbc port office at Pendle
ton, Oregon, aa aecond claaa mail mat
tor. ON SALE IN OTHER CITIES
Imperial Hotel Neva Stand, Portland,
UN Kll.K AT
Chicago Bureau, 009 Security Bulldlnft,
Waahmgtnn, D. C, Bureau 601 Four
teenth Street, N. W.
Meanber of the Auerlatrd rre.
The Aeaociated Preaa a excluaivtly
entitled to tho uae for republication of
all nwa diapatchea credited to it or
not otherwise credited in thia paper
and alao the local newa publiahed herein.
BITBSCRIPTION RATES
(IN ADVANCE)
Dally, one year, by mall
Daily, aix months, by mall ...
Daily, three moirtha, by mall
uaiiy, one month by man
Dail.v, one year by carrier
Daily
Daily, three months by carrier..,
Daily, one month, by carrier ...... .(6
Semi-Weekly, 1 year by mail 1.00
S. nil-Weekly, six months by mall.. 1.00
Henn-Wetkly, three months by mail .t)
le.o
J.00
1.60 I
.60
7.50
six months by carrier ., S.7S j
l.s '
Telephone
f "Ff" e3 fi
St OSRS
by EdatX GuestL
niv
The thirsty ground drank eagerly the
rain.
The rows filled their petaled cups
with glee.
The drink a sweet to every plant
and tree.
It hrousht new life unto the growing
grain
And set the brooks to babbling once
again;
The world was made a lovely thins
to see,
Paved for the harvest was the fruit
to be. I
(Copyright, 1921
The springtime had not done its work
in vain!
Too much of sunshine makes a bar
ren earth,
Parched is the soil which never
feels the rain,
The spirit withers under too much
mirth.
Beauty is born of trial and of pain.
If man Khali bring to blossom his
belief,
There must be days of doubting and
of grief.
by Edgar A. Guest.)
THE MONEY IS ALL THROWN IN THE LAKE
TTHE chief reason why there will be no money for the McKay
I creek project this year is that 93 per cent of all the income
of the United States government is being expended for war
expenses, in one form or another. With so much money going
to feed the war god there is little left for other purposes. Conse
quently those who seek part of the modest seven per cent of the
national income for economic uses are accused of being pork
barrel grafters and other varieties of the sinful. The nation
cheerfully throws its money into the armament lake but has
none for irrigation ; for hydro electric development and other
enterprises that would go to build up the prosperity of the coun
try and its people.
So long as present conditions continue this situation will be
with us. So long as we continue our policy of aloofness and iso
lation we must keep our powder dry and our fleet up to date.
There is no escape from the necessity of preparedness unless we
wish to court disaster.
But this country has it directly in its power to so alter world
conditions that the building of dreadnaught on dreadnaught
will no longer be necessary. The League of Nations in which
ail principal allied and neutral powers of the lata war are mem
bers aims at enforcing peace and fostering disarmament. But
we would have none of it and we have no McKay project either.
It might be said that the people are getting what they asked
for but that is not entirely true. An influential element in he
republican party held forth to the voters that should Mr. Hard
ing be elected we would either go into the league or get some
thing as good or better. Harding was elected but no such hopes
Lave been realized as yet. Consequently there is some impa
tience manifest.
In a most respectful but earnest letter to President Harding,
Hamilton Holt, editor of The Independent (New York) calls
upon him to disclose his plans for world peace, declaring that
the time has come for him to redeem his promises in this re
rpect. After recalling Mr. Harding's campaign promise to seek
to establish an Association of Nations, Mr. Holt says :
. "You have not yet given the American people the slightest
inkling of the terms of this Harding Association that you pro
pose shall supplant the Wilsn League. . . . You cannot
hope to get public opinion behind your association without tak
ing your countrymen into your confidence."
Pointing out that democratic support is necessary to the rat
ification of the covenant of such an association, because the
democrats control more than one-third of the senate, Mr. Holt
continues: .
"Mr. President, the time has come for you to redeem your
,. romises. The country and the world have waited long enough
to know just what kind of an association of nations you have in
mind. If you delay much further people everywhere will in
evitably conclude that either you have no concrete plan at all or
else that you propose to put party harmony above world wel
fare." That letter was written some weeks ago and the president
has not answered it. There is plenty of time yet and the presi
dent should not be judged too quickly. He may have something
splendid in mind. On the other hand he may not. No one
seems to know.
Meanwhile that 93 per cent expenditure continues and other
countries are arming, too, because, they dont know whether to
prepare to love us or to fight us.
And the $225,000 allotted for the McKay project on the last
day of the Wilson administration is missing and is missed.
ROUND -UP
SOUVENIR
ENVELOPES
Use them for your cor re
spondence Neat, attractive,
Picturesque. Send them
away
Advertise the Round-Up.
Cnn Bo Had at I ho
rlair fQreon5ij)
ONE CENT EACH
Cheer up, some wool is being sold and a million bushels of
this year's wheat is sure of $1 a bushel or thereabouts.
We dont want to know why we cant get the Grant county
road ; we want to know how we can get it.
o e o e a e o a-oe e o e e a e
In choosing a man for chief justice the president could have
gone far and found no better man than William H. Tat't.
Those boys "from Astoria" opened up an argument that is
proving very beneficial to the auto tourist camp ground.
The Jugo-Slav Orchestra
Chautauqua Brings Unique European Musical
Organization on Fourth Day
This Store Will Remain
Closed Monday, July 4th
To coniiVieiiiorate the Declaration of Independence.- 1 "
Many of you will take a two days' trip or outing and will
?ed something "extra" in the way of wearing apparel. Shop
net
tonight, the store will he open till 8:30 P. M.
A MEW COLLECTION OF LOW
PRICED MUSLIN GOWNS AND
UNDERSKIRTS
made of long cloths ap4 nainsooks,
trimmed with laces and embroideries,
sizes 15 to 19, various styles in low
neck, short sleeves, high neck long
sleeves, prices from . . .$1.13 to $2.25
Luxite Italian Silk Underwear
Vests and bloomers are made of very
best heavy Italian silk, ' reinforced
where needed, vests $3.50, bloomers
$4.50i : . ,
JANTZEN BATHING SUITS
for women and misses. Nothing bet
ter made in swimming suits, $5.75 to
$9.00.
Rain or Shine Silk Umbrellas, ideal
for sun or rain, colors are navy, pur
ple, red green and brown '$0.23 'to
$9.39. . 1
ONE PIECE OF 98c PONGEE SILK
left. This exceptional quality will
not be here long as the price is e'x
cedingly low. The yard . , . . 98c
SEE THE WINDOW DISPLAY OF
KHAKI OUTING WEAR
Hats, breeches skirts, coveralls, leg
gings, jackets, etc., all priced reason
ably. ...
Chautauqua
July 10th to ICth
i .
i -
? I f0n f28 YEMS ABB J
SL'.I F & JP & the Daily East IMVRon.an, .
J&St JU AVM, A h" ft ! term of m-hool in district S Immidi- O
f 'K , fWf after ,he Fourth. ; g
I ' Vl! UfS tTjf, f& I Countv- Surveyor' Arnold, noptity ; O
W li Vi " ?J? lf V VSii tl' Surveyor W hitney and party were en- (
V. 0 v i r I ' ' eamued Thursday niKht at Uhman 0
II - J ' ' ' i . I I Snrines. Thev a re loca t i nc the con n- ' O 1 , , i
2 i " ' j? - CJ3f5. (t. i O. D. Feebler says drain conditions o
H'U L , "J I 1 A at Stage Uuuh are excellent. ig
W i I" -- i i Tom FaKe left last nlpht for n
t YiJ " & ' V? ' ) '" i ' 1 huMnna tH" '" portlan"- ig
f:. .Wi IS ROBBED OF DiAMONDSi
llTtV ' . .;V4T:7ir.:riyW V' "eancfl Fred VoBler. preHident I mW I iK
I ll ii r-; - r -il " I , I "'" I 11
Chautauqua
July 10th to Kith
East Oregonian Priming Department !
Quality PRINTING at Reasonable Prices-
From tfio heart of Europe 'romps to us nttp of the most unusual find fit
tractive musical comp.-inirs on the Chautauqua platform. The Juco-Slnv Tarn
burica Orchestra is ahsolutely uniqtir the only one of Its kind in America.
These young "minstrels of the Balkans" appear in the hrisht colorful rostiiines
of their native land, sincinj? anil playing tlieir Slavie miisi", extraordinary Id
its sweetness and thrilling power. They use various sizes of the tamhurica,
their household instrument of their people for generations. They will give a
full afternoon concert on the fourth day and a prelude in 'the evening.
MMMMtllMIMMMMMMMMMMMiMMMMMMM
DICE TONIGHT
-Payant'
Union Hall
Some Dance
UNDER AUSPICES AMERICAN LEGION
Orchestra
All Welcome
niHtMMHIIHMMUIIIMMimHHIMMIMMMMM
VI HtTLANIV July S.s !.' P.)--Yckks
beaitcft Fred VoKlcr, "resident
of the Northwest Auto Co., and rob
bed him of J loot) worth of diamonds,
then escaped.
Help tame from the skies when a
man walked off the -sea wall recently
into the Potomac Itivi r. . The pilot of
a seaplane five hundred feet in the air
saw him piiinKe into the wuter and
swoopinx down enabled his companion
flier to drag the drowning man to
mifety.
DOINGS OF THE DUFFS
THINGS CAME IN RAPID ORDER.
BY ALLMAN
llN MM
1 -fj KRElSLERr I
LET HOUSEWIVES BEWARE!
HE statistics of the Fire Underwriters show
that electricity
I causes more fires than any other single cause, and of those,
electric irons produce per cent! I he second most pro
lific source is matches and smoking; the third is defective chim
neys, and so on. Gasoline must answer for a large share of the
increase in fires in recent years. There are many, housewives
vho use gasoline for cleaning purposes, and who let the open
can of it stand near the hearth or the kitchen stove. Those peo
ple would not let dynamite lie around in such places, yet it takes
eighty-three pounds of dynamite to equal the explosive power of
u single eonuii ui. sojjiiuc. Aiuin jiiu Aiarcn oi invents in
uie vvoria s vvorx lor July.
'1
In His "Four-Gallon" Hat
f . - '!. ':.
il- . i; .' . . .'.:..'. :".!...:
t ' v
-' v' " J
. 'V
wctiiintf th' cowls.y hat Kiwn turn a un Uivl-
5AV, TOKVOO KNOW THAT GOOD
I ' LOOKING GIRL THAT '5 VI5ITING ACROSS!,
v, THE STREET FROM US? WElU r
J 1$ . ' JU5T5AW HER AMD SHE WINKED ( . P-
"
( f I 1 " - T THEN CAME. HER PARASOL If
I. Dip . I yX: on the top of my m
I . j , i 1 y head! i m
X i And Them 'A L
Kreisler's Tribute to
General
Dawes
"Melody in A Major"
This air was written by an American
General, Charles G. Dawes, and, selected by
Krcisler because of its simple, unaffected
loveliness. - '
VkU Rd Seal Record. 64961
Amazing Record by Galli-Curci
"Scnnambula-Come per me sereno"
A brilliant, dazzling aria, wherein Mme.
Gilli-Curci displays the gloriops heights of
her vocal power.
Victor Red SmI Record. 74644
New Rachmaninoff Prelude
"Prelude in G Sharp Minor "
Thisw-a treat for mustcians and lovers
of music Rachmaninoff playing one of
own preludes. Do not miss it.
Victor Red Seal Record. 64963
Let us play for you these
New Victor Records for July
FXOrsOMY'DIUIG
r COMPANY '
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