East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, June 02, 1921, DAILY EDITION, Image 1

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    THE EAST OREGONIAN IS THE ONLY INLAND EMPI RE NEWSPAPER GIVING ITS READERS THE BENEFIT OF DAILY TELEGRAPHIC NEWS REPORTS FROM BOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ATiD L';.nTn Uin
1
DAILY EDITION
.1 I '1
Th net press run of yesterdsy'a Dully
3,364
Thl piper I a mn-i-r of and audited
by th Audit llur.au of Circulations.
Th East Oregonlin la Faster Or.
fron t greatest newspaper and ll
nf fore gives o the advertiser or
twles th guaranteed paid clreulstlcn
In Pendleton and Umatilla oountjf of
any othf newspaper.
1 uiy
COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPER
COUNTY OFHCIAL PAPES J
VOL. 33
DAILY EAST OREGONIAN, PENDLETON, OREGON, THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 2, 1921.
NO. 9842
DAILY EDITION
'SI
BLACK AliD WHITE
RIOTS IN TULSA
ARE INVESTIGATED
1
Will Fix Blame for Actual Kill-
. ing of 100 Persons and De
struction of Much Property.
RACE HATRED CONTINUING "
' FOR 24 HOURS CEASES
Entire Population Chiefly Con-
cerned in Finding Shelter for
10,000 Homeless Negroes.
TVlJiK CHtlo.. June 2. (U.
p.) white doad, 10; negro
dead, 0; White Injured 75; N'e-
Cro Injured ZOO; property Inn 4
11,500.000. Demrnyed by fire.
twelve blocke of realdeneea In
the nrro aeotton. Homeleea
1,000 necroea and 8,000 white.
v.auMt. aliened attempted rape on
White girl by necro. How quell-
ed Kour companies of atate
troopa. totalllnr (00 men. .
TULSA. Okla, June t.lV. P.)
Covernor Kobertson ordered a grand
Jury Inveatikotlon Into Wedneadny'a
rlota. Attorney Oenernl FYeellnu will
direct tha Inveatiaatlon to fix the
blame for the actual killing of 100
peraona and arson which brought de
struction to 1000 blacks and fiOOO
whites.
Tho race hatred, after flaring for
24 hotira, burned out. The whites who
fought a furious battle and the entire
black male population are now chiefly
Instrumental In finding a ahelier for
JO.000 homelesa negroes? '
Tha negroes who fled from the an
gry mob are returning to the city.
Karmera are rounding up the blacks
and returnlnfl- them.. l detention
camps. Practically the entire nea.ro
population spent the night under
guard. Armed motor trucks patrolled
the streets. He vera I thousand dollars
waa subscribed to rebuild the homes'
of the destitute and relieve the suffer
ing. Pick Rowland, a Jailed negro,
whnae attempted rescue started the
not, was amuggled from the city. The
whites are concealing him.
TuIhs Again Normal.
TULSA, Okla., June 2. (A. P.)
Tulwi has resumed a normal atmos
phere except for the presence of 500
national guardsmen sent here yester
day, after the rioting between the ne
groes and white men. Including a night
of Incendiarism In which virtually the
entire negro quarter was destroyed
with a lose df about a million and a
hall dollars. The estimates of dwid
has dwindled. Nine white dead are
Identified and 15 negroea are account-1
d tr. Tha wounded are estimated
at 240. Some still estimate the ne
gro dead aa high as 40, but a casual ;
aearch haa failed to disclose additional
bodlea or hones. Many of the 6000
negroea, under guard at the fair
grounds have lost their entire posses
sion in the fire.
WHITE MEN ARRESTED. "
TULSA. June 2.(A. 1.) Thir
teen white men were arrested by the
guardsmen, accused of looting the ne
gTO quarter.
E-
'AT HOME' THIS EVENING
Pendleton people will have an op
portunity to sea a $(0,000 Ice, butter
and Ice-cream plant In operation when
the Swythe-Lonergan Co. and the
Oolden West Creamery will throw
open their doors to the general public
tonight.
The new building, recently complet.
ed, will be open for guests and butte
Ice and Ice cream will be made,- the
machinery being the last word In mod
. ernlty. Charles Pmlth i in charge of
the making of. Ice cream. Jack Nahb
Is In charge of buttermaking and W.
It King la in charge of the Ice plant.
WUIIam O'Rourke Is assistant mana
ger for tha creamery.
An orchestra will provide music for
dancing upstairs and refreshments will
he served during the evening. The
whole affair Is In the nature of a
houaewarmlng and promises to be on
of entertainment and Inatructlon for
the public. ,
OLD,
AND
MAN
DESERTED, LONELY
. ..
DESPONDENT, AGED
ENDS HS LIFE
OREGON CITT. Ore., June 2.
(IT. P.) Old, deserted and
lonely, Pankratlng Murugg, 78
yeara of at. shot the top of his
head off with a 30-SO rifle. A
neighbor, pay.ng a visit found
the door and windows fastened.
Investigated and found the body.
The old man was despondent hi
neighbors any.
0'
I.
)
Arrow pnlnta to the rnrrlnxe of I
hl winter may at Ilnyama. The Japa
COUNCILMAN DESIRES '
STREET PAVED; WOMEN
CAUSE HIM TROUBLE
A hearty laugh waa enjoyed by-
members of the city council Inst
night when Councilman It. C.
Lawrence asked hla colleagues
how much longer It will be be
fore the proposed paving on
Thompson street Is underway.
Now there Is nothing of the
mlrth-pmvoklng nature about
such a question as that, hut
when Lawrence went Into details
and explained his reason for ask
ing for the Information It was
found that the third ward
councilman haa been approach
ed many times by many house
wives along the street on which
the Improvement Is planned, and
their questions have resulted In
much discomfort to him.
"They're cleaning house, and
about as fast as the houses are
cleaned the wind takes thnt loose
dust back Into rooms." Law
rence reported. "They're mak
ing It pretty lively for me. and 1
want to see thnt business fixed
up."
IL
E
Measure Does Wot Meet Hearty
Reception at Hands of City
Dads Who Take no Action.
The first draft of the milk ordinance
In the framing of which representa
tives of the Women's Club, the county
agent, the dairymen, the city physician
and middle men who sell milk hud a
hand was read to the council Inxt
nlaht.
The ordinance provides that the
dalrvnien must have a license from the
city, the fee to be regulated on a slid
ing scale with (5 an the minimum
charge for a dairy of five cows or less.
For dairies with from six to 10 cows,
the fee Is 110, and for every additional
cow above 10, an additional fifty cents
Is to be charged If the . measure Is
adopted.
The ordinance would also permit the
city to revoke licenses of dairies In
cases where It Is shown the law Is not
being observed. Provision Is also
made for Inspection of the .premises
and equipment used where milk Is
produced and bottled. It Is provided
that the money secured from license
fees shall be placed In a special fund
for defraying expenses of administra
tion incurred In the enforcing of the
ordinance.
Two faults were found with the pro.
posed measure by members of th"
council in the Informal discussion that
followed Its reading. There are no
provisions requiring' a specified
amount of butter fat to he contained
in th milk' sold In Pendleton. The
other crdlticlsm was that no dairy
men rouldT be reasonably expected to
comply with all the provisions of the
ordinance.
Estimates prepared by City Engineer
Frank B. Hayes for assessments in Im
provement districts Nob. 80 and 81
were submitted to the council.
The matinee of the Kelley Commed
lans for the benefit of the summer
normal school will be held Saturday
afternoon If th's date proves a -cept-ahle
to the company.
3 BRITISH SOLDERS
M.HL1N. June 2. (U. P.) Three
I British soldiers were killed by the
S nn Fein in amousn in tne county or
Ketry. The soldiers were trapped
near the town of Klllorglln, and shot
down without a chance to respond to
line Sinn Felner fire. An inspector.
sergeant wu killed with two consta-
1 bles and two constables were wound-
led.
'
!SERC.FANT XKl'MAS SENTENCED
i I.EIPS1C, June 2. (A. P.) Per-
geant Neumann, accused of 111 treat-
Ing British prisoners, was sentenced
to six months Imprisonment.
i
JAPANESE GET RARE SIGHT OF EMPEROR.
f
Iffl S It
-si
u
iff-. ?i
rLL.
hn Jim.in.rr cmnfror. Tha oirlur w
nHe aeldom hove eeen'thj-lr ruler In I
COAST CITIES EXTEND .
INVITATION FOR 1922
FEDERATION MEETING
Mrs. Ida B. Callahan, it is Pre
dicted, Will be Unopposed as
Candidate for President.
Pome coast city of Oregon will prob
ably he chosen as the convention city
for the next convention of the Oregon
Federation of Women's flubs, predict j
aeiegaies nere rnr tne 19Z1 convention
Tillamook and Newport will each ex
tend nn Invitation tomorrow and Med
ford will nlso ask to lie the convention
city for next year.
Mrs. Ida n. Chllahan, It Is predicted,
will be unopposed as candidate for re.
election to the state preaidency at the
election tomorrow. Most of the mem
bers of the state board, it la stated, will
' . rnh8l.lv fie elected but there ts talk of
a contest lor the first Mce-prwildency.
between Mrs. Collins Elklns, of Prlne
vllle. present Incurtbent. and Mrs. Wil
liam Bell, of Rosehurg, now second
vice-president.
(incuts of Athena Club
One hundred fifty delegates were
guests of the Athena Civic Club for
luncheon today In the neighboring
city, mntorlntr over from Pendleton fur
the event. Oreat baskets' of purple,
lupin were used as a decoration, an t
each guest received a boutonnlere of
old -fashioner flowers, the feature
claiming a shower of praise for Its
charm.
Mrs. D. Scott Fisher, president of
the club, gave the address of welcome
and Mrs. Callahan responded. Mem
bers of the committee who assisted
Mrs. Fisher In. making general ar
rangements were Mrs. Fay IOrnw,
Mrs. Marvel Watts. Mrs. F. E. Boyd
and Mrs. Ralph McEwen, prominent
Athena club women.
Musical numbers at the Athena
MANY AMERICANS ARE
IMPRISONED IN RUSSIA
LIVES ARE ENDANGERED
Secretary Hughes Working onj
Plans to Get Prisoners Out of I
Hands of Bolsheviki Alive. '
I
WASHINGTON. June !. (A. L
Bradford, l P. Staff Correspondent.)
Lives of more than n score of Am
erican citizens Impr soned or detained
In soviot Russia hinge on tho efforts
of Secretary Hughes to obta'n ,
release, it Is believed here. Hughes is
working out plans to get the Ameri
cans out of the bands of the bolshevik
ist authorities alive. Hughes fears a
mievarrlnite of the state department's
plans would result In tne deaths of
some, but the failure lo get them out
is a hint against the honor of the
I'ntteii Slates Is the opinion he holds.
The state department reee.veil ad
vices relating the serious plight of the
Anier cans. Some are Imprisoned. No
official reports, or names are being
made public for fear It might preju
dice the chances of the Americans be
ing rescued.
SEATTLE HAS EPIDEMIC
SEATTLE, June 2. (U. P.) An
epldom'c of suicides Is keeping the po
lice and coroner busy. , Four are dead.
two were gassed, one was hung and '
one Is dead from causes unknown, the
autopsy may establish the reason for
death. AH were men over SO years of
ng.
self,
ny.
James Carton, who hung him-
Is a member of a well-to-do fain-
" y.4v X
urn
J
JS X u
.1 1
n taben nn hi irrioi in Tni.
tie lanl two year becnuw of his lllnMK.
luncheon were.: love's In My Heart,
Thank Ood fiir a Oarden Nettie
tireen Taylor, of Portland. ( Meadyw
Lark and Lullaby Mrs. I). T. Stone,' of
Athena. piano Solo. Coricert Etude,
No. 4 Miss U.clnda Dell.
Club tietM ltewilts
The Athena club, of (4 members, has
during Its two years of existence rais.
ed (800 which has been expended foi
civic and craritahle purposes. The
club was active In securing a local
free auto camp groifhd and three pav
ed streets for Athena.
Mrs. Alexander Thompson, Mrs.
Collins Elkins, Mrs. p. L. Campbell
and others read reports this morning.
For this evening, scores of local motor-l
lets will take the visitors to Cabbage
Hill for a sunset drive. Presidents are
to he entertained at a big supper. .MIhs
Klnota Thomson, of the University of
Oregon extension department, sneaks
this evening andthere will be music bjL
Mrs.-Jane Thatcher, .. .r,.
Mrs. Winter Speaks
Mrs. Thomas G. Winter, national
president. In her address last night
which preceded the reception In her
honor, made a plea for keeping up the
high standard of. the American home
and family.
"The home Is the unit of American
society today." she declared. "The
questions of the finer relations be-tv.-een
the sexes, uniform marriage and
divorce laws all origlnnte In the home.
Our federations are outgrowths of
Uiese homes and they can do Much to.
ward saving our I'nlted States from
destructive elements."
fhe said every element that in trying
to disrupt the United States is playing
up group consciousness, creating an
tagonisms, and makinir us look at tach
other with distrust. The remedy lies
in developing national consciousness,
she declared, and said that toward
this, a hody like the federation, made
up of every type of wamen over the
whole land, can contribute materially.
TO FARM PROPERTY
Cyclone Was First in
of County; People
Safety in Storm
History
Sought
Cellars.
jKRON', Colo.. June 2. (l P.)
Hundreds of volunteers are assisting
the farmers In northern Washington
county to clenr the debris in the path
of the tornado. Tile tornado was the
first in the county's history. Striking
late yesterday, the storm killed live
stock and demolished farm houses.
People sought sarety In storm cellars.
TilRERTY BONDS SELL
NEW YORK. June 2. tU. P.V
Liberty bonds sold heavily, some Issues
at a record low price. The decline fol
lowed the announcement of the feder
al reserve board that after July first
liberty bonds would be valued at mar
ket prices in rediscounting counters!
loan. Heretofore the par value was
recognised.
KEL1OGO INTRODUCES IHIJj prm fwuins by drivers or o.u ' 'II h
WASHINGTON, June 2. (A. P.) I trot 1 y fining Individu il.i ww pi v.M
A bill giving the president authority toi'
Invoke the federal courts and to use1
the army and navy to enforce the court
ruling to maintain the treaty rights of
aliens irrespective of any state law,
was introduced by Senator Kellogg of
! Minnesota. Xhe president would be
authorized tn Instruct generally and 1
1 ussumo the defense of the aliens. j
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMnSSIONpnj IQII TDnflPC
TO SLASH RATES ON 5 DAYS' NOTICE
Officials Say it is up to Roads
Themselves; Rates 70 Per
Cent Over Pre-War Levels.
WASHINGTON', June 2. (Ralph K.
'"otich, IT. I Htaff Correspondent.)
The interstate commerce commission
believes the railroads are In a posi
tion to slash -rates. It Is up to the
roail themselves, the officials declar
ed. Four hundred tn'lllon in wage re
ducHon and J 100, 000,000 In coal pur
chase reductions, allow the roads to
j face the possibility to relieve the ship-
pert. The rates are now 70 per cent
over pre-war levels. Railroads and
shippers are workinjf together and
can put the new rHtes effective In five
days' notice, the officials maintain.
ltlVEK COXTLM ES TO HIKE.
PORTLAND, June 2. (A. P.) A
new rise in the Willamette river Sun
day is predicted. A stage then of 22
S-lfl Is fnieeaxt. The upper Columbia
and Pnake are again rising. Wenat
chee reported 6-10 rise and Lewipton
half a foot. " The Willamette here to
day Ik 22 1-10.
AXTI-BOlSIIKVIK REVOLT
SPREADS.
PEKING, June 2. The untt-bot-shevik
revolt in Eastern Siberia, which
began with the capture of Vladivostok
and nearby towns, has spread to
Blagovesichanesk, the capital of
Amur province. The new socialist
government at Vladivostok continues
functioning.
CONTOIS TOLD JO
OKMULGEE, Okla.. June 2. (A.
P.) Contractors In charge of con
struction of a seven-story building here
yesterday were warned to dismiss from
their employ all negroes when a notice
signed "committee" was found tacked
to the fence around the excavation for
a baaement her late today. The no
tice reads that "something will be
done" Is the order Is not observed.
PRODUCERS NEGOTIATE
Pacific Coast Fruit Men Claim
That High Rail Rates Are
Strangling Fruit Industry.
SEATTLE, June 2. (U. P.) Rep
resentatives of the Pacific Coast Pro
ducers Association of Oregon, Wash
ington and California, which was
foimed yesterday, are negotiating with
the Intercoastal steamship companies
tor a rate not exceeding 90 cents a box
for refrigerated space from Pacific to
Atlantic ports. C. S. Whitcomb, the
president of Loa Angeles, say he ex
pects a fair rate to be assured.
The association controls the total
production of 57.000, nno boxes annual
ly. The prime object of the associa
te is to move fruit by water and i
being supplemented by steps forming
an export trading corporation, under
the Webb act. to extend to western
fruit markets of foreign countries. The
"h'ah rail rates are strangling the
fruit Industry, the fruit men claim.
Four thousand carloads are expected
for transhipment this season and 600
carloads of California fruit additional.
T
T'ie pit.ctice of racm? wit.i the fire
truc lien alarms aro sounded and
.!.; tillier In front of the. 'iig out
fit i.r nailing; closely in th1? retir 's a
.Vint that Is likely to rM.i't n ii scri
rii r.i iilont, disenssien at Hie n-el-in.
of" tin council last .lin'U disclose!.
C iiui 'aims of the pr.V"'i i ce of th?
p:".ctic. were brought to tl.e s'.ten:ni
f the cornel! through .i teoo't male
l.y W. K Rlngold. fire !ill' to th"
i.5v'.rtuar of the fire committee.
Vhik ccosiilering thi 'test nivlhols
of tixckmg thin violation, u ivks dis-cl--Til
tint there Is a cny ordinance
I!, ii nukes it unlawful 'or cars tOj)ier husband. The woman plead guil-
iconic vithln 20 feet if fire nppnin-
t.is v Ii ic it is o.it miswcrln an aluii.i.
I 'm.vmally, a prop.il as nlso
In .mIo that traffic shout.) cvis during.
;-. t ine the bell Is .jii'ii-Tn.t the
a!arm. That would per.iv the fite
,i i:c"; tht right of way to which It is
cut Ht!.
Vii' practice of bieuK .g funeral
i-stunt, and the trart:-! officer
! bo instructed to see Hint the vl-
jo'enirs of thts city ordiiuu shall be
r.r;es;d and haled into sourt, l"e
cou-ie.l recommended,
MARKETS ARE STEADY
PORTLAND. Ore., June 2. (A. P.)
Markets are steady.
BAND CONCERT TO HAVE
BEEN HELD FRIDAY
NIGHT IS POSTPONED
The band concert which was
to have been held Friday night
as the opening number of th
series that has been arranged
4V for the summer months haa been
postponed. The necessity of
putting the date forward waa
realized this morning by Director
A. W. Lundell. Five of the
band's principals are either en-
gaged for playing at Weston on
that date, or they are sick and
will he unable to appear.
"I am sorry to change the
date." Mr. Lundell said this
morning, "but I feel that It
would be better to postpone.the
concert rather than to appear
with the organixatlon crippled
by the absence of so many play-
ers."
The concert will be held
Thursday evening, June 9.
J
4
ST.
Nine Young Ladies Will Receive
Diplomas at Oregon Theatre
Thursday at 2:30 P. M.
The annual graduating exercise of
St. Joseph's Academy will be held
next Thursday. June 9, in the Oregon
theater at 2:30 p. tn.. when nine girls
will r.a v a dlnlnmsi
The graduates are Miss Vera Rellew.
Miss Frances Carroll, Miss Estelle
Roden and Miss Laura Schwarz, who
will receive diplomas for the Latin
Scientific course; Miss Eunice Bott,
Misa Jessie Schubert, Miss Alice Mc
Keown, Miss Evelyn Anderson and
Misa Velma Dotson. who will receive
diplomas for the commercial course.
Misa Roden will receive a music diplo-l
ma also." " .
Following is the program, to which
the general public Is invited:
Motto "What we are to be. we are
now becoming."
Chorus Give' Me My Own Native
'Isle. (Harp accompaniment)...
Miss Daphne Belts
! instrumental TKo The School Fes
tival
Mifcs Jane Kavanaugh, Misa Dorrls
Sommervllle Miss Mary Helnen,
Miss Marine Daly, Miss Lavelle
Welch. Miss Bertha Monese. .
Violin Selection Valse Gracieuse. .
George Snmerville, George Heck
Ian. Joseph Pedro. Accompan
ist, Miss Ella Pedro.
Essay Character
Miss Frances Curroll
Donizetti Fantasia
Miss Vera Bellew, Miss Laura.
Srhwarz.
Violin Soio Gavotte Rococo
Miss lrma Richter
Song The- Gates Ajar
Miss Mae Kilkenny
Irish Harp, Miss Irene Bucsko.
Violin, Joseph Pedro.
Essay Ethics of the Dust
Miss Vera Bellew
Selection Liszt Miss Stella Roden
Valediotoiy Misa Vera Bellew
Conferring of diplomas and address
...Rev. J. M. Van Hoomissen
T
PLEADS GUILTY TODATfe;
FRANCISCO. Jun 3 U I
n ihe fifth anniversary -if his vcd
dl.m Roy Gardner, the trail ,1 H'.ilit.
I noVci guilty in the I' i'.vral court f
rv.-tKiik n mail train nttir . Uoseville.
t'.i
Cnrdner escaped vhlie i n roiilo)
to Mi-Neil's Island to ;crv"e
term f!
25 ;en!s, on May ,2 nth. l-'e rout ed
rail 'i.ick In San Dles: !'i 111 and
fi ,h w'ng a guilty ple-i. ' lardner w.us
sviier;re. lo 25 years m Mc Veil's Isi.
LIFE IMPRISONMENT
P.KIPO.KPOUT. Conn.. June 2
Mrs. Ktbel Nott was sentenced to life
imprisonment for assisting Klwood B.
Wade here paramour, in the murder of
ty to second degree murder. Wade
was hung In the state prison two
weeks ago,
AtxuniplHv Is Mitemvd
Shortly after JncUe Maltble sentenc
ed .Mrs. Ethel H. Not, to life Imprison
ment, he sentenced her accomplice,
John K Johnston, to a years imprison
ment following hia plea f guilty on
the charge of manslaughter.
ltO! .SI IKY 1ST AGENTS A1UIESTED
MEXICO CITY. June J. (A. P.)
Three alleged Bolshevist agents dis
rutnhed as hegmra. were arrested to
Guadalupe last night for attempting to
break tip religious services held by th
Knights of Columbus. They later wer
released and were stoned by a crowd.
FIGHT FREIICII III
UPPER SILESIA
Hungry Poles Mob French Sup
ply Train and-Guards Open
Fire, Insurgents Respond.
GERMANS THINK FRENCH
IN SYMPATHY WITH POLES
Germans Allowed lll-Feeling to
Break Into Active .Fighting; '
They Were Forced to Retreat
OPPELN, Upper Silesia, June 2.
(Carl D. Groat, U. P. Staff Correspond,
ent) The starving Polish Insurgents
are fightintc'the friendly French sol
diers. Alar.y live are lost n th sklr
mlshing. A report place the most vi
olent outburst at Kattowlts, where th
hungry Pole mobbed a French supply
train The French guards opened
fire, and the Insurgents responded.
Several were killed. Th German
are also harassing the French, believ
ing them sympathetic to the Polish
claim of the major portion of Upper '
Silesia.
Germans at Beuthen allowed Ill
feeling to break Into active fighting. '
Thousands surrounded the French gar
Jlaon and opened revolver fire, break -
tug windows and causing other dam -ag.
They attempted to seize th
French tanks. The tank crews re- '
pelled the attack, using revolver and -
I l.hrea,ened 8 "h'n un flr-
The
Germane were forced to retreat, learn
ing a number killed. ' '
Many Women Voluiitcc.
OPPKLN. Silesia. June 2 A. P.)
French aoldiera garrisoned at Beu
then, near the old Polish frontier,
have been attacked by organi2ed Ger
man inhabitant numbering g0O. "
i ne - German a ..attacfc- -wait welt
planned, wire between the French
Headquarters and the barrack had
bei-n cut, the sentries were driven back
and the headquarters detachment ur
roundedV The French rushed tank to
the scene, and the Germans, armed
with pistols attempted to capture th
machine but were driven into th
buildings from the windows of which1
a hot fire was opened. The tank "
charged the buildings, firing volley
through the .. doors and window.
There were many German casualties.
The Polish ' Insurgent aided th
French When the' Germans attacked
the French, - Germans and Poles en- ,
gaxed In a hattle near Gross-Strehlita, '
and Germans forced the Polish Insur
gents to withdraw from their strong
I positions. Women are volunteering
for service. Many are wearing men'
clothing and driving wagon and au
tomobiles. FARMERS' RELIEF BILL
PASSES SENATE TODAY
WASHINGTON, June 2. (A. .P)
Another farmers relief measure." th
I bill of Senator Curtis republican of
rvrtimus, lo IIHIII up III JO,UOU,UOV TO
the federal farm loan banks to dlstrt-
j uuie bhiuhx lurmers at not over a
percent Interest haa passed th senat
assurance of an early house ap-
j ,uc ,itiu.,iirii iPiunri V'lllMUl wilt
I passed the house and m as ent to th
Th. 1 1 .. V. .1. V. 1 1 1
senate.
POLICE DRAG KIVKR.
PORTLAND, June 2. P.)
The notice are rtruiririnc the Willum
ette river to recover tho body of th
man who jumped from the dock to
escape arrest following the discovery
of a break Into a box car. A patrol
man discovered the man, fired Into
the air, and gave chase. At th end
i of the dock the man threatened th
I policeman with a knife, then as th
officer, gun In hand, approached, be
turned and leaped Into the river. N
trace of the man ha been found.
Today's weather report by Mitjor
Lee Moorhouse, official observer; '
Maximum. 84.
Minimum, 4s.
Barometer, 29.43.
TODAY'S
FORECAST
Tonight and
Friday tu.tr:
r . r - . s
THE WEATHER
. j
i