East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, May 31, 1916, DAILY EVENING EDITION, Image 1

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    DAILY EVENING EDITION
weather
Tonight and Thursday generally
fair.
YESTERDAY'S WEATHER DATA.
Maximum temperature, tt, mini
mum. J; rainfall. I; wind, fair, n
tie, weather clear
TO ADVERTISERS.
The Bast Oregonlan baa the largest bona
fide and guaranteed paid circulation of any
paper to Oragoa, eaat of Portland and by
tar the largest olrcolatlou In Pendleton of
any uempaper. ,
COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPER
VOL. 28
DAILY EAST OREGONIAN, PENDLETON, OREGON, WEDNESDAY, MAY 31, 1916.
NO. 8828
I ' mMMmm
V
Jl MILLION MEN
MAY BE HURLED
AGAINSTVERDUN
Forecast is Made That Germany Will
Bring Up Immense Force for the
Supreme Test.
FRENCH ARE VERY CONFIDENT
IliaWic That Defender Uau Hold Out
All Attacks That Teuton
tiny Hurt; In Counter Assault,
rranck Ran Much of boat
BERLIN, May 31 All Frenuti
troops bans been cleared from
the forest mhjUi of Cummleren,
the Germans taking M prisoners,
It waa officially announced. Tor
pedo boats which atmroacned
the Belgian coast were driven off.
Between the latitat- canal and
Arras lively fighting was report
ed. Thirty-eight Urltlsb soldiers
and 18 machine guns wen can
tared near Neuvc Oiapelle. A
aaval cannon and a quantity of
salne throwers were taken In the
(taarette woods.
(BY HENRY WOOD.)
PARIS. May 31. The hundredth
day of terrific fighting at Verdun
found the (Sermon Crown prince
bringing up fresh legions Into action
west of the Mouse. Critics agreed to
day that the Teuton offensive Initiat
ed Sunday waa the rinal supreme ef
fort designed tu pierce the French
line. The kaiser was reported re
turning to Verdun to witness the Ti
tanic struggle. The Germans have un
loaded fresh dlvtilons from Russia.
It was rumored also that Austrians
war en route to Verdun. Dome be
lief that the Austrian smash on the
Italian front was merely a blind to
cover the shifting of the Austrians to
vrdan
The French in a counter attack at
midnight, regained their losses south
of Cumleres. The French had evacu
ated the first line of trenches and re
tired toward Chattancourt under the
most violent attacks that the oldest
veterans had experienced.
Before the end of the week, it was
forecasted that the Germsns would
have a million men hammering at Ver
dua. The French public Is calm and
confident that General Nevielle will
maintain the northwest forts tena
ciously lr he Is forced to retire upon
i hem.
The fighting northwest of Verdun
grew more furious at nightfall and
ontinued today. The Germans re
lieatedly attacked on a front two and
a half miles long. Each charge was
shattered. Meanwhile the Germans
threw scores of high explosive shells
into the French defenses, leveling the
trench, which naturally was abandon
ed. A German detachment which
reached the Meuse Was surrounded
nil annihilated.
Mouth of Cumleres the French retir
ed along the Chattancourt railway and
!uKbt behind the embankment. In
a oounter-attack delivered there at
twilight, the Germans were thrust
back.
The French ousted the Germans
who had penetrated trenches east of
suffers In Alsace.
3
THE LOCAL HIGH
IL FILLED
HOARD NAMES TEACHERS TO
TAKF. UP POSITIONS MAIF
VACANT.
At a meeting of the school board
held yesterday, three vacancies In the
high school faculty ror next year
were filled by the election of J. Lau
rence Whitman to the chair of science,
Ukw Camllle Dolson as Instructor In
the department of Latin and (lermnn
and Mr. Kendall to the department of
agriculture.
This action fills all vacancies except
the prlnclpalshlp which, It la an
nounced, will probably not bo filled
until late in the summer. The nor
mal department has been abolished
and Miss Norma Graves, the normal
instructor, haa been sniffed to another
department. She and the principal
will take the classes formerly con
ducted by Mrs. Osmer B. Smith.
Mr. Whitman succeeds W K. Liv
ingston. He la a Pendleton boy, a
graduate of the Pendleton high
school and of the University of ore
gun where he received the degree of
VACANCIES
SCHOG
(Continued on page eight.)
Asquith Sees No
Hope of An Early
Peace in Europe
1 KUM HOUSE OF COMMONS THAT
homjwkg amn no en-
COU RAG KM KMT.
LONDON. May 31. Hollweg's last
speech held no hope of an early
peace, Asuulth told the house of com
mons, responding to queries whether
the allies were willing to consider
peace overtures. Sir Arthur Mark
ham, u luborlte, asked the question,
based on Wilson's rumored intention
of making overtures. Asquith briefly
said that Hollweg's last address had
not Indicated that Germany was ready
to consider peace terms which would
safeguard the allies interests. He had
nothing to add to Grey's reply.
Churchill, discussing the motion to re
duce Kitchener's salary, made the
harshest criticism heard in commons
since the war began.
Churchill charged the British war
cfflce with "grave mismanagement
I'd inefficiency." He called it a "de
fective organization." He said that
for every six soldiers In the British
army it has only one rifle leveled at
the enemy.
E, E, CALVIN IS ELECTED
PRESIDENT UNION PACIFIC
NEW YOKK. May 31. E. E.
Calvin of the Oregon Short Line
was elected president of the Dni-
f Pacific today succeeding A.
Mohler. The change is effec
tive July L It was announced
that an injury sustained when he
fell while Ice sklatlng In January
caused Mohler's resignation.
MRS. LOWELL IS CANDIDATE
FOR THE SCHOOL BOARD
ANNOUNCEMENT IS MADE THIS
AFTERNOON OF HER
ENTERING RACE.
Mrs. S. A. Lowell Is a candidate for
the position of school director to suc
ceed J. V. Tallman who Is to retire
from the board in June. At the pres
ent time It appears the race will be
between Mrs. Lowell and Dr. 1. V.
Temple though there Is yet time for
other candidates to enter the con
test. The announcement In behalf of
.Mrs. Lowell was made to the East
Oregoniun this afternoon by a dele
gation of ladies. They stated Mrs.
Lowell was urged to enter the race as
a candidate of the women of the cltj
but not of any particular organiza
tion. She possesses the proper quali
fication necessary for the position.
Only Man Delegate to Women's Convention, and Some of the Women
Get acquainted with Mr. Smith
Herschel T. Smith of Fulton. Ky.
Mr. Smith is a famous man. he has
just stepped Into the brightest spot
llfcht that will shine In this country,
outside of the national conventions
this year. For. Mr. Smith is Oil only
man delegate to the Thirteenth Bi
ennial Convention of the General
Federation of Women's Clubs, which
held forth in New York City.
WITHDRAWAL IS
ASKED
CARRANZA NOTE
De Facto Head Says Troops Should
Leave Mexico as Evidence of
Good Faith of U. S.
EXPLANATION ALSO DEMANDED
Unlaw Administration Acts Promptly
in Meeting LsUest Request, Carran
xa Dedans Mexico Must Consider
the Presence of Troops aa Un
friendly. WASHINGTON. May 31. The
withdrawal of American troops from
Mexico us evidence of good faith on
the part of the United States was re
quested in Carranza's latest note de
livered today. Pending the withdraw
al, Carranza asked for a definite ex
planation of the reason for keeping
the expedition there and what its
purpose is. He declared that the
American force Is remaining Idle. If
the troops are not withdrawn, and no
explanation Is made the communica
tion asserted that Mexico must con
sider the presence of the soldiers an
unfriendly Invasion.
COLUMBUS, May 31 Pershing
started for Dublan today to confer
with (Savlra. He expects to arrive to
night. WASHINGTON. May 31. Carran
za's latest communication was de
livered to Lansing today. Officials
declared it merely was a "continua
tion of diplomatic correspondence be
tween the Mexican and the American
governments."
May Options Low
at Close of Market
CHICAGO. May 31. (Special to
the East Oregonlan) Today's range
of prices
Open High Close
May 11.06 tt 11.07 11.04 tt
July 31.07 11.07 31.07 tt
Portland.
PORTLAND, Ore., May 31. (Spe
cial) Club 87 bid. 91 asked; bluestem
9s bid. 31 asked.
Zeppelin Is Destroyed.
LONDON. May 31. Descending
near Vales, a German Zeppelin struck
a tree and was destroyed, an Amster
dam dispatch stated.
HEUSCHELL T.
AGAIN
. l ,-' ' 1
- on
, Mm mf
MRiT RALPH TROUT MAM.
Mr. Smith Is proud of himself, of
his distinction and of the ladles.
RIGHTS OF INDIANS TO USE WATER ON
RESERVATION LANDS UPHELD BY COURT
All Trains Stop
For Five Minutes
For Hill Funeral
OPERATIONS GOME TO PA I. Sr.
OIT OF TRHHTE TO LATE
MAGNATE.
In tribute to the late James J. Hi::,
the empire builder, who died several
days ago, all operation! on the O.-W.
R. & N. and Nothefn Pacific were
stopped for five minutes today. Early
this morning the local office of the
O.-W. received orders from President
Farrell to4 cease operations between
12 noon aid 12:05 and similar orders
were recewd ut the N. P. office. The
orders lncpde the stopping of all
trains in transit The hour of noon,
western time, corresponds with 2 o'
clock at St. Paul, the hour of the fu
neral of the empire builder.
HYPHENATES ARE
FLAYED BY I. R.
COLONEL INVADES STRONGHOLD
OF GERMAN-AMERICAN
CITIZENS.
ST. LOUIS. May 31 (U. P.) Col
onel Roosevelt dissected, flayed and
excoriated the hyphenated American
here today in a city having the sec
end largest German-American popu
lation in the United States The for
mer president has seldom been so vit-
rolioltc as he was in denouncing the
moral treson of hyphenates. He spoke
at a luncheon of the City Club.
The German-American alliance
came in for a larger snare of the col
onel's wrath. He held this organiza
tion and Its branches to be composed
of people "disloyal" to the United
States and "unfit for citizenship." Ho
made a powerful appeal for "America
for Americans," while lauding in
glowing terms the patriotism of the
foreigners who came to America and
as citizens proved their fealty to the
stars and stripes by deeds of heroism
and public service.
"Here in St. Louis I wish to speak
briefly on the subject of American
Ism," the colonel began. "I stand for
straight Americanism, unconditioned
and unqualified, and I stand against
every form of hyphenated American
ism. I do not speak of the hyphen
(Continued on Page Eight.)
SMITH . KEN.
Moreover, he is a very popular man.
No mere woman delegate enjoys half
bis popularity.
Memorandum of Decree in Matter of Adjudica
tion of Rights on Umatilla River and Tribu
taries is Filed by Judge Phelps; Provides In
crease in Maximum Allowance to Users
Along Umatilla; Appeal Likely Will be Taken
to Determine Respective Rights of Indians
and the Byers Milling Interests.
Confirmation of the Indians' claim
to a primary' right to a use of water
on the Umatilla reservation; an In
crease of the maximum allowance of
water from one-half inch to one Inch
per acre to the waterusers along the
Umatilla river; a revision of the lists
and schedules of landa in the west end
of the county according to relative
dates of priority; and a general agree
ment with the findings of the state
water board.
These will be the principal points in
the decree of Circuit Judge helps in
the matter of the adjudication of the
water rights of the Umatilla liver
and its tributaries, as Indicated by a
memorandum which he filed today.
The preparation of the decree will
commence tomorrow and Judge
Phelps will be assisted by George T.
Cochran, superintendent of water di
vision No. 2.
The decree of Judge Phelps is giv
en upon an appeal from the findings
of the state water board which took
testimony for five years. It is very
probable that an appeal will be taken
to the state supreme court from judge
Phelps' decree and the United States
supreme court will doubtless be called
upon to make the final determination
of the respective rights of the Indiana
and the Byers milling interests to the
use of the water of the river
Indian Rights Upheld .
The decision of Judge Phelps as to
the rights of the Indians to use water
on the reservation lands la of much
interest and importance locally. In
asmuch as, upon the ultimate determi
i.ation of this question depends wheth
er the reservation lands can be irrl
gated.
Judge Phelps does not attempt to
say whether or not the right of the
Byers' milling company, as given by
an act of congress. Is a temporary or
permanent one. However, he does
hold, that the treaty with the Indians,
setting aside the lands of the reserva
tion for the use of the Indians, implied
a right to the use of water too for do
mestle and agricultural, purposes.
In this connection he says:
"It is my opinion that when the
United States by its treaty of 1855 set
aside for the use of the Indian the
land included within the Umatilla res
ervation that such water as was or
MRS.
W.E.
ANDREWS
VA4-H.0.C,
"I have attended each and every
session of the convention.' said he.
"And I have attended each and every
luncheon my delegnteship entitles me
to. As a matter of fact, I nm regu
lar luncheon fiend."
The mere women, clustered here
about Mr. Smith, are among the
t.olables of the Federation. Some ot
them arc officials.
might be needed for domestic uses,
end for the purposes of agriculture
was also set aside or reversed, and
that to the extent said water may be
required hi the cultivation of the
lands upon the reservation there la
tested In the Indian a paramount
right"
In this finding he follows the ruling
of the U. S. Supreme court In the case
of Wlnteds vs. the United States. That
case had to do with the implied res
ervation of waters of Milk river for
litigation purposes in favor of the
Indians on the Ft. Belknap reservation
in Montana, and in that case the gov
ernment's contentions in behalf of the
Indians were upheld. The fact that
the Umatilla reservation lands are of
(Continued on Page Four.)
T. JR. Believed to
be Willing to Go
Back Into G.O.P.
WOULD AMALGAMATE IF HIS
PRINCIPLES ARE SUPPORTED.
IS THOUGHT.
ST. LOUIS, May SI. Addressing
800 citizens at breakfast preliminary
to his regular speech later. Roosevelt
served notice that he is fighting for
the principles of preparedness and
Americanism, wherever he found
them, in a party or tn Individuals. His
talk burned with vitriolic condemna
tion of Wilson's atttlude toward pre
paredness and military service. His
auditors variously interpreted his re
marks as Indicating his readiness to
amalgamate with the republicans If
they support his beliefs or his deter
mination to herald his principles
through a third party.
He vehemently branded as Infa
mous falsehood the charges that mu
nitions makers were behind the pre
paredness movement.
Prominent Athena
Farmer Dies After
Stroke of Apoplexy
JAMES S. MYRICK PASSES AWAY
THREE MONTHS AFTER
HIS WIFE.
Stricken with apoplexy about 11 o'
clock yesterday morning, James S.
Myrick. prominent Athena farmer,
died about 3 in the afternoon at St.
Anthony s hospital. His death follow
ed that of his wife by about three
months.
Deceased was the eldest child of
the late Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Myrick,
f loneer residents for whom Myrick
station was named. He came to this
iounty with his parents in 18S5. com
ing here from Takima. Before living
In Yakima the Myrick family had liv
ed in Missouri and Illinois. There
were four other children in the fam
ily. J. W. and B. F. Myrick of this city
A. P. Myrick and Mrs. Ida Nushaum
of Helix.
Deceased Is survived by two daugh
ters. Miss Dora Myrick of this city,
and Miss Pauline Myrick of Athena.
The body will be shipped to Athena
for burial.
Hughes Kceis Silent.
WASHINGTON. May 31. Hughes
remained silent today regarding his
presidential candidacy. He directed
his secretary to reply, "Nothing to
say," to every inquiry.
12,000 Men Ready to Strike
in Cities on the Pacific Coast
Water Traffic in Danger of Big Tie-Up
PORTLAND, Ore., May 11.
Members of the International
Urns-shoremen's Union will strike
in every 1'ariflc coast city from
Skugway to San Diego at six
o'clock tomorrow morning unless
the demands for higher wages are
granted. It was predicted that
waterfront shipping will he para
lyzed If the men strike. Twelve
thousand men were reported
ready to strike.
Foreigner Admits
He Meant to Kill
J. D. Rockefeller
THROWS BRICKS THROUGH
WRONG HOUSE nOWEVER;
IS ARRESTED.
NEW TORE. May SI After throw
ing three bricks through the window
of William Vanderbllt's mansion, be
lieving he was enangerlng John D.
Rockefeller's life, Saerbes Rsowrdd,
a foreigner, was overpowered and ar
rested. He told the police that ha
planned to Kill Rockefeller when ha
ran from the house.
The bricks wrecked a valuable mir
ror and damaged some furniture Po
liceman Lavender heard the crash and
arrived on the scene Just as Vandar
bilt and his wife appeared at a second
story window to learn what was
transpiring. Believing a bomb had
been thrown, the policeman hurled
himself upon the man and they fought
fiercely for several mlnutea Rsowrd
des will be examined for his sanity. He
is a native of Italy
WARNED NOT TO
DEFY AMERICA
PRESIDENT WILSON INSISTS ON
SVUb AliLBGIANOE TO THE
UNITED STATES.
WASHINGTON. May 31 President
Wilson delivered a Memorial day ad
dress here yesterday, in which he de
fined the spirit of America, warned
citizens of foreign birth not to set
themselves against the purpose of the
nation, called upon young men to
perform voluntary military service and
defended hla recent suggestion for an
alliance of nations to preserve peace.
He spoke at Arlington National Cem
etery before an audience made up
largely of civil war veterans, who ap
plauded him vigorously.
While he declared he had no harsh
ness in his heart for Americans of for
eign birth and expected them still to
love the sources of their origin, the
president said "America must com
first in every purpose we entertain
and every man must count upon being
cast out of our confidence, cast out
even of our tolerance, who does not
submit to that great ruling principle."
Readtuess to Fight Asserted.
Speaking of America, made up out
of all the peoples of the world, as the
champion of the right of mankind.
he said:
"We are not only ready to co-operate,
but we are ready to fight against
any aggression, whether from within
j or without. But we must guard our
selves against any sort of aggression
which would be unworthy of America.
We are ready to fight for our rights
when there lights are coincident with
the rights of man and humanity "
The president reiterated his sugges
tion before the League to Enforce
Peace last week that the United
States was ready to become a partner
in any alliance of the nation "which
would guarantee public right against
selfish aggression."
AUSTRIANS TAKE TOWNS
VIENNA. May 31. The Mistrl.
an stornteil ami cupttirvd tin- a
lined towns of Astavo ami AM.
ero, upon wtuVh resto! the Ital
ian's main Alpine dvfinn- tt was
officially anmnmeil (KJht im
portant ...sic:i.n- iti.-Huii ,. M"n
tcbaldo. ata wt-re taken, it was
deosarejat,
Seattle and Sun Francisco em
ployers already have declared
themselves against the wage In
creases. There is little hope of
averting a walkout. Seattle
dockworkers already are atrlk
Ing. Portland steamboat men
threaten to strike tomorrow
simultaneously with the long
shoremen. Seattle dock worker,
however, oppose the longshore
men, making the fight thtr a
three (Ided on.
FOREIGN
BOM