East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, July 18, 1904, DAILY EVENING EDITION, Page PAGE FOUR, Image 4

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DAILY EAST OREGONIAN, PENDLETON, OREGON MONDAY", JULY 18, fS(W.
PAGE FOUR.
AN' INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER.
Published every nftcrnoou (except Sunday)
at Pendleton. Oregon, by the
EAST OREGONIAN PUBLISHING
COMPANY.
the story of Moses Lore, of Union.
Eastern Oregon's oldest ptoneor,
which the Sunday Oregonlan printed
yesterday with credit to the Blue
Mountnln Eagle. The editor of the
East Oregonlan knew of Mr, Loru
and of his remarkable history, visited
Union,, Interviewed the old pioneer.
cure a list of students best nuulliled
to receive anil profit by a course or In
structlon nild education In thu United
StnteB shall be held under tho direc
tion of the division superintendents
on or boioru tho 31st or March in
each year licrcntter.
Candidates for examination must
be students or the public schools and
natives of the Philippine Islands, of
SUIlSCItHTION KATES.
Dally, oue year or mail
Dally, lx mouths by mall ,
Dally, three months by mall
Dally, one month by mall
Dally, per month by carrier
Weekly, one year by mall
Weekly, six months by mall
Weekly, four months by mall . . .
Heml-Veekly, one year by mall . .
Semi-Weekly, six months by mall
Heml-Weekly, three months by mull
and gathered history from him suf-jgood moral character, sound physicnl
flclent to build a biographical sketch condition and not less than 1G nor
KINSHIP.
..txoo ,,. Til0 story was first printed in mi thn 2t -vmrs (,f "B,
nn
lisr. the Dally East Oregonlan of June 2S,
und being Interesting history, wus
l.so
.50
2.00
1.00
.50
Member Scrlpps McItac
tlon.
News Assoola
The Hast Oregonlan Is uu sale nt It. 1!.
Rich's News Stands nt Hotel Portland and
Hotel reruns, rortiana, Oregon.
San Kranclsco llurenn. -(OS Fourth St.
Chlcaso Itureau. UO'.l Security Ilulldlng.
Washington. D. C. Ilureau, 501 Htb St.,
N W.
Telephone, Main 11.
Entered at Pendleton pixttottlce as second
cln matter.
a
If is not growing like a tree
In hulk, doth make mnn bet
ter bo;
Or standing long an oak, three
hundred year,
To fall a log at last, dry, bald
and sere:
A Illy of a day
Is fairer far In May
Although it fall and die that
night
It was the plant and flowor
of light;
In small proportions we just
beauties see,
And in short measures life
may perfect be.
Ben Jonson.
Immediately reprinted in nearly
every exchange In Eastern Oregon.
Most of tho papers using It were con
siderute nnd Just enough to credit tho
story to the East Oregonlan. Among
those which did not so observ.o tho
rules of legitimate Journalism was
the Dine Mountain Eaglo, of John
Day, the story appearing in that pa,'
per as nn original article. From that
paper the Sunday Oregonlan and the
Pendleton Tribune copy the story
giving credit to tho Eagle, three
weeks after it appeared in the East
Oregonlnu. Tho editor of tho Eaglo
did uot make the effort to get the
story, did not know of the character
perhaps, yet he appropriates the la
bor and property of a fellow laborer
and allows the mistake to go ttneor
reeled. The readurs of the Enst Or-
t'gontnn, however, were furnished the
story three weeks In advance of Its
use by the metropolitan press, which
fact compensates for all subsequent
injury.
UPBUILDING OREGON.
Awake to Oregon's highest interest
and keenly appreciating the valuo of
the best and widest advertisement
of the state's resources, the O. It. &
N. company, through the efforts of A.
L. Craig and H. M. Hail, has secured
the services of S. Olonn Andrus, n
special writer on the Chicago Record
Herald, to write up the states of Ore
gon, Washington and Idaho, in tho
height of the harvest season.
It. M. Hall, advertising agent of the
O. K. & X., accompanied by Mr. An
drus, was in the city yesterday, on a
tour of the wheat belt, "tnkin notes"
and will spend some time in Umatilla
county, Walla Walla and the Palouse
country, acquainting Mr. Andrus with
the features of a Pacific coast har
vest and giving him an estimate of
the magnitude or this Northwest
country.
Mr. Andrus Is a writer of striking
plcturesqueness, force and magnet
ism, and his letters on the Northwest
will start immigration westward with
a new impetus. Imbibing his first
and best draughts of Inspiration from
the infectious enthusiasm of Mr.
Hall, he may be expected to produce
a western fever that will tax the
carrying ability of the Harriman
lines.
Mr. Hall has established a reputa
tion for himself and the O. It. & X.
company with the people of the In
land Empire, by his faithful portray,
al of facts in recent editions of "Or
egon, Washington nnd Idaho," th.e Il
lustrated booklet Issued by the O. R.
& N. company, and the coming of
Mr. Hall to the Inland Empire In
search of data, Is sufficient cause for
stopping harvesters, water wagons,
cook wagons and nil other busy ele
ments in a Umatilla county harvest,
until his wlHhes are supplied and his
note-book filled with statistics.
He has treated the Northwest
states royally In his former statisti
cal reports and write-ups. Not one
man has been deceived by his reports
and to such a man the peoplo of the
Inland Empire turn with genuine
friendship and admiration.
The people of this county and
Eastern Oregon are invited to furnish
Mr. Hall and his friend, Mr. Andrus,
all available crop and harvest infor
mation, for It will bo used to the best
advantage in the Interest of the state.
The desire of the Harriman sys
tem In publishing these booklets and
Illustrated letters Is to place true
conditions before dissatisfied peoplo
In the East. An untrue condition por
trayed by this company would only
redound to its loss and discredit,
after the first rush of homeseokors.
Dut truthful and fair portrayal of
Western conditions and opportuni
ties, results In a continued, growing,
appreciative host of friends who
como to look upon the system and
Us faithful agents as tho true sources
of Information and who como West
on the merits of the case presented
to them. Such people usually stay
to become citizens and homo builders.
While the Eagles' carnival has been
a success, nnd the lodge lias made n
eat forward step in collecting funds
f'ir nn elegant building in this city,
yet the fact remains that the money
spout with the foreign carnival com
pany might have been better i spent
In patronizing a home fnir associa
tion. The fact is demonstrated again
that the people of Pendleton will pat
ronize any public enterprise, cheer
fully, cordially, generously. Had this
carnival just closed oeen an agricul
tural fair, and speed program, five
times the nniount of money would
have changed hands In Pendleton,
much of It would have remnlncd with
the farmers and stockmen of this
county lu prizes and purses, where,
us'lt is, the bulk of It goes to a for
oign concern which can do the city
ut earthly good, and which will for
g? ilui Pent 'eton Is on the map,
until another route for a summer
:ai nival program Is laid out. With
the ec -operation of the state and the
leghletors from Eastern -Oregon, it
seems that Imatllla county could get
a county fnir organization. The peo
ple art- amusement-hungry, as shown
by their patronage of the carnivals.
How much better would a stock and
agricultural fair be for the city and
county?
L'xamlnntlous were held last Bum-
mer nnd 100 boys were sent to Cali
fornia, where they are now In the pub
lic schools. They were tho bright
est pupils In the public schools of the
different provinces of the archipelago.
The public schools of Southern Cali
fornia wore selected for them be
cause It was considered desirable to
educate them In the most democratic
manner possible and to have them
come Into direct dally contnet with
American children of their own age;
they were distributed as boarders
among homes of well-to-do Christian
people, who would tench them by ex
ample and precept the duties, the
pleasures the blessings and the ethics
of home life, and the climate of Cali
fornia wns considered the most nd
vuntngeotis because it is nearer thnt
of the Philippine islands than can be
found in any other part of tho United
States.
The cost of maintaining them Is
about $25 n month each, not including
clothing, for which they are allowed
$150 n year, and bonks, for which
they are allowed $0 a month. The
government pays all expenses and
provides them with an outfit. Ex
change.
One of the most interesting tilings
occurring In the Socialist movement
just now is the persistent and care
ful study and Investigation that Is
being made by socialists of the times
and the teachings of Jesus, says the
Vanguard, It has been claimed that
socialism Is hostile to Christianity,
and It Is constantly asserted that
Jesus had nothing to say about social
and economic problems. This has
driven some of the socialists to Inves
tigate the matter and they have gone
at the task with the evident faith
that Jesus could not by any fair In
terpretation, be held to be hostile to
socialism. With characteristic zeal
and thoroughness the beginners of
this study of the times of Christ
have already been made. And some
most interesting matter is being
brought to light. The condition of
the laborers at the time of Christ,
the labor unions of that time, the
Christian communion, and the rela
tion of the unions to the struggles of
the Christians, Christ's open denun
ciation of the rich and espousal of
the cause of the poor all these and
many more Interesting facts are be
ing investigated.
If the Blue Mountain Eagle has any
respect for the rules and amenities
of respectahljo Journalism, It will give
the East Oregonlan proper credit for
EDUCATING THE FILIPINOS,
One of the wisest things the Philip
pine commission has done was to pass
act 854, under which the superinten
dent of education is authorized to
send to the United States each year
100 boys and girls of high school age
for tho purpose of training them to
become teachers, lawyers, doctors, en
gineers and for other professions ou
condition that for five years after
their return they shall be subject to
the orders of the government for pub
lic service. This wise law reads as
follows:
"In each of the school divisions of
tho archipelago examinations to so-
In the Summer.
During tho summer month soma
member of tho family Is sure to suf
fer from Cramps, Bowel Complaint or
Diarrhoea. Always keop a bottle of
Hostettor's Stomach Bitters In tho
house for such cases. A dose at the
first symptom will afford prpmpt re
lief. Then It always cur.es Headache,
Belching, Poor Appetite, Nausea, In
digestion, Dyspepsia and Malaria.
Try one bottle. The genuine has our
Private stamp over tho neck,
HOSTETTER'S
STOMACH BITTERS.
DOMINION DAY.
It Is 37 years since the scattered
provinces of Canada were consolidat
ed Into one dominion which gave
birth to the impulse of nationhood.
The start was made by men of great
faith men who believed In the abili
ty of the people to make the dominion
strong and great. That faith has been
more than justified. The pulse of the
nation heats with full and quickening
life. The most sanguine anticipa
tions of those who laid the founda
tions of the dominion are being real
ized. There have been days of trial,
days of adversity, days of gloom;
there have been good times nnd there
have been bad times; there hnve been
race differences which have been fol
lowed by fuller and clearer under
standings, religious differences which
have led to broader toleration, but.
looking around us and above us,
there is hardly a cloud visible on the
sky. The sun or Canada's prosperity
shines clear and high. Ottawa Free
Press.
I nut the voice of the voiceless,
Through mo tile dumb shnlf spoil:,
Till the denf world's ear bo mado to
hear
The wrongs or tho wordless wonk.
From street, from cngo nnd from
kcnnol,
From stable nnd zoo, the wall
Of my tortured kin proclaims the sin
Of the mighty ngninst the frail.
Oh. shnme to the praying Churchman
With his unstnlled steed nt the
door,
Where tho winters bent with snow
nnd sleet
Or tho summer sun-rays pour!
And shnmo on tho mothers of mor
tals Who have not stooped to tonch
Of the sorrow that lies In the dear,
dumb eyes
Tho sorrow that hns no speech.
The same Forco formed the sparrow
Thnt fashioned Man, the King.
The Cod of tho Whole gave a spark
of soul
To furred and to feathered tiling.
And I nm my brother's keoper,
And I will fight his fight.
And speak the word for boaBt nnd
bird
Till the world shall set things
right.
Ella Wheeler Wilcox.
RHEUMATISM
JOINTS AHDHUSCLES SW0LIEN AND STIFF
A disease so painful and far-rcachinp- , .
upon the human system as Rheumatism nnVt i lU effWs
and well-laid foundation. It originates Zi iadt
the blood, nnd, like other diseases of Z n
qucntly inherited. The poisonous acids u-i.i. ,' is
blood is charged circulate through the svst, ch "it
down the health, irritating stcm' ltaliiBj
uci vvs, ;i;iiiiiju 111 juillis T l,n,l Coin ,
ntul tnilRlW nml -ncin ft,, tlim rS"?W attack 1SW.
.-.urn i., .iiiiihB puma peculiar lelno evoV J"a,mnooMatMif
to Rheumatism. Unless the .m.dVU?? aV$
blood Is purified, joints nnd S gSJn,S,5f. STo'IWM
muscles become coated with could not "o swoli :. u,g
the acrid mntternndnre rcn- .t".?5?urFea whinW'aopwi?
dercd stiff and sore, nnd the wSti w.'S'Wntla"!
nerves completely wrecked. "85 Mt. VoruonA.. -ubI
Rheumatism, beintr a constitutional l.Wi '
ment. Liniments, nlasters nnd kmMi ti.i ' e' Quires i.
' " ""' """;' as arc annli.i
uiuy temporary relief 8 S q r. . , uHit!l
, . punuers nnd toni ,Pca
flflPQ lK npf c, ... . 'U1"CS, and m -
does itnet so promptly and wV?,4mi
t.sm, nentralWK 'the acid, and 1 1
to n Mire, lien Mi -...t:. uu !Kwnntvl
j loiuiip; up me nerves anu nil parts of the svstcm It ;7 ,UT,a
! vegetable. Write u should you desire medical advic J"ra,!tt
uouiinir. Tr cuirr- J
co., ATlAn2
HOW MAUDE GOT SQUARE.
Oregon State Normal School, Mo
.Maud Muller, on a summer's morn,
Heard tho toot of an nuto horn.
She saw the judge go whirling past.
"Geo!" said Maud, "he's going fast,"
And then she thought of tho sighs and
tenrs
The judge had caused her nil these
yenre.
"He's breaking tho law at that speed,"
quoth she,
"Ha' ha! ha! hn
me!"
I
Heglns Its twontv.tw.j I
tcmber 20. 1904. Fn, J.6? I
school year, attorttar
. ior beginning a course B 3
I November, February ud Ap
I The Bes Training for Tei;S
r & I u 0 Ilorn,al mirBe. lth It. .
SJftV ot Ba Positions at JfJ
iur new caia omiK
,?!& Write
W'wlv fU," lnf0rmatl01 concerning
study, traliilnc In nn,i i..S
rr., .,!.! i
u..w,i,Cu uiiuit real conuitlonj U t
,uu i-iiuuuy senonifl. nnrl i..
about the advanced course of study with the additional
f,,r tnelin.I ",U"B
Address Secretary J.
So she set her teeth, and ne'er e'en
flinched,
While she took his numhor nnd had
him pinched.
B. V. Butler, or President E. 0. Ressltr
., .
"lunmouin, OrtjtJ
FAIRBANKS A TEETOTALER.
It is said that Senator Fairbanks
never took u drop of liquor In his
life and is heartily opposed to the
trimtlli linhlt. In fnnt hi, Vine r
use for a person who tr.eats. "That j
reminds me of a fellow who used to
travel around with the boys, says
Colonel Clifton, In the Arkansas Ho
publican. "He liked liquor, hut hat
ed to treat. We never knew him to
buy, but when any one else ordered
he was Johnny on the spot. Suddenly
he got sick, and when about to
breatho his last sent for a friend and
said: "I'm a goner. Here's my bank
book. I have no heirs. Take It all.
We have been friends for many years
and you know ray style. Give me a
decent burial, erect a tombstone over
my grave and put on It an appropri
ate Inscription.' The friend liad a
square block of marble placed on the
grave, with these words on each
side: 'This Is On Me.' Now York
Cost of Producing Crops.
A writer In the Ohio Farmer makes
the following interesting comment
"The cost in time and money to grow
our crops lias iiuen reduced by nin
chlnory. but not enough to meet the
demands of. and the scarcity of labor
ers. Once It required four hours and
3D minutes' labor to grow a bushel
of corn, now 41 minutes of tlmo is
enough. The cost was 3G?i conts
now It Is 10 cents. One hour tot
shell It once; now one minute. In
the old time of 35 hours was con-1
sinned In growing a ton of bay; now
11 hours and 34 minutes. The cost'
wus $3.liC; now $1.29 ier ton. The
saving ou the corn crop was $!i:!3,fl00,-
000.
GAINING
Dr. Frantz H, Coo, president of the
Washington Medical Society, warned
his family that his death was near,
and on Saturday night, 48 hours
afterward, fell dead from complica
tions of Ilrlglit's disease.
American rice has been introduced
into Cuba.
Press.
No Whips In Moscow.
There Is a notable law In force
In most of the large Russian towns
concerning horses. Among the curi
ous things that arrest tho attention
on arriving In Moscow Is the entire
absence of whips among drivers of
cabs, carriages and all sorts of vehi
cles. There Is a law prohibiting their
use, and there is not a single whip
In use In Moscow. Tho excellent ooi.
ditlon of the horses attest the benefit
of this humane law. Nothing can ex
ceed the beauty of the sleek and. well-
groomed horses used In the carriages
of Moscow.
The Pacific Northwest Publishing
Company has been formed by John
E. Lathrop, John W. Cook and It. 1,.
Darrow. of Portland, cnnltal
$5000. They will enlnrge and con
tinue to publish Lathrop's Northwest
Magazine of Portland.
Risk and extravagance all
taken out-of
In btkiiif .powdct
coffet nivorinc itrcte
oil
by Schilling's Best goods ant'
dealing.
Your grocer's; money back
HALF PniCE SALE ON LATE
BOOKS.
Frederick Nolf & Co.
ISO Books now 75c. 'Here aro
a fow titles:
"Truth Dexter," by McCall.
"Lying Prophets," by Phlllpots.
"Tho Ward of King Canuto."
".Martin Brooks," by Batos.
"Sir IUchnrd Calmady," by Mo
let. "A Woman's Man," by Norris.
And many others. Call and
see the balance of titles.
Drink
OffiSCENT
REAM. .
It is Fine
IN 1 and 2 LB..
SEALED TINS. ONL.y
AND
lNlON frfADE,
Hand made.,
Clear Havana.
A STANDARD FOR QUALITY.
CLEANLINESS AND WORKMANSHIP.
When you call for a TRIUMPH,0
GET IT. Don't accept a substitute;
Jul an
Ell II A
FLYNi
MAKERS
Oregon
Portland
St. Helen's Hall !
A OIItLS SCHOOL OF THE HIGH
EST CLASS corps of teachers, loca
tion, building, equipment the best.
Send for catalogue.
Opens September 1C, 1904.
Walters' Flouring Mills
Capacity, 150 barrels ft day.
Flour exchanged for wheat.
Flour. Mill Feed, Chopped
etc., always on hand.
Feed,
GOOD DRY WOOD
All Kinds
i nave good sound wood
which is delivered at
reasonable prices
For Cash.
W. C. MINNIS
Leave orders at Neuaun's
Cigar Store.
HARVESTERS'
HEADQUARTERS
OUR STOCK OF SUPPLIES FOR THIS HARVEST SEASON IS NOW COMPLETE IN EVERY
RESPECT. IF IN NEED OF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING ITEMS, VIZ.:
5i
FORKS,
HOEDOWN8, t
RAKE3, ;
SCYTHE8,
SNATHS, . f
WATER BAG8,
'WATER KEQ8, , "
' CURRY COMB8,
BRU8HE8,
MACHINE OIL8,
AXLE GREA8E COMPOUND,
LACE LEATHER,
CAP SCREWS,
8ET SCREWS,
SMITHING COAL,
BAR, BAND AND SHEET IRON
BABBIV,
ROPE, j
WHIPS, . i''
OIL CUPS, . , . i
VALVES, . ' ' '
PIPE,
8TOVES,
RANGE8,
GRANITE AND TINWARE, ETC.
3 ' t 'PHONE MAIN 211, OR CALL ON
W. J. CLARKE & CO.
211 COURT STREET
sal
DE
il
ItM0"" '
Te
CO!
Bet
Ha, Nit'
(MilHt)(rs.