East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, July 08, 1904, DAILY EVENING EDITION, Page PAGE EIGHT, Image 8

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    DAILY EAST OREGONIAN, PENDLETON, OREGON, FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1904.
PAGE EIGHT.
t
July Clearance Sale
From July Gth to 31st, wo will mako It n special Inducement
for you to buy your shoes and Oxfords from us. On all brokon
lines of shoes and Oxfords wo will mnlto BIG nEDUCTIONS, nnd
you will save money by purchasing at this salo.
Tho best of shoes at bed-rock prices.
DINDXNGER, WILSON & CO.
GOOD 8H0E8 CHEAP. 'Phone Main 1131.
DIED LAST EVENING
UNEXPECTED PASSING OF
MRS. CUNNINGHAM.
Was 45 Years of Age and the Second
Wife of Charles Cunningham, the
"Sheep Kink" Her Husband and
Two Children Survive Her Was a
Native of Ohio Funeral at the
Catholic Church Tomorrow.
.Tho death of Sirs. Charles Cunning
ham .wife of tho Eastern Oregon
"sheep ting," which occurred yester
day afternoon at 5:30 o'clock, enmo
as a complete surprise to Her rela
tives and friends. Sho underwent an
operation for removal of a tumor at
the hospital last Saturday, and nn
peared to be recovering from Its ef
fects. It developed, however, that;
her system was too weak to rally from
tho shock, and when what Httlo vi
tality she had .left- was exhausted, sho
sank rapidly to hor deatll.
The deceased woman was born In
Hamilton county, Ohio; and was 45
years of age. Her maiden name was
Cecilia Flanlgan. She came West
about 12 years ago and was wedded
to Mr. Cunningham while living with
her aunt, Mrs. Patrick Kino,, a. resi
dent of this city. She had a largo
circle of friends who will sincerely
mourn her untimely demise.
Mrs. Cunningham Is survived by hor
husband and two children Cecilia,
aged 10 years, and Charles, aged 7.
She also leaves a mother, a brother
and a sister, all living In Indiana.
Her aunt, Mrs. KJne. is the only rol
ftUre living in the West. Mr. Cun
ningham was married previously and
by his former marriage had a daugh
ter, Sadie, aged 20 years, who Is em
ployed as bookkeeper by a largo bus
iness house of Portland.
Tho funeral will tako place from
tho Catholic church at 9 o'clock to
morrow morning, tho Ilev. Father
Van Dor Veldon ofllclating. Inter
ment will bo in tho Catholic cemetery.
FIRST NEW WHEAT.
Sudden
Summer
Sickness
Al bis season ti ere Is al
ways the danger of sudden at
tacks from stomach and bowol
troubles. It Is best to be pre
pared to prevent serious re
sults by having always at
hand a bottle of our
Blackberry Balsam
Thero Is nothing like having
a good r jedy when it is need
ed. For tho quick relief and
cure of colic, cramps, cholera
morbus, dysentory and ordinary
diarrhoea, It is pleasant and
may be tsken by young or old.
Your lonoy back if It falls to
give satisfaction.
Tallman (Sb Co.
LEADINC DRUGCISTS
Light Land North of Yoakum Is Yield
ing About 26 Bushels Per Acre.
E. W. McComns, tho grain buyer,
has Just received samples of now
wheat from tho William Yonka place,
north of Yoakum and west of this
city, one of the first crops threshed
In tho county this year.
The wheat Is of an excellent grade
and Mr. McComns estimates that -the
crop will yield about 200 sacks to tho
quarter section, or about. 25 to 2C
bushels per acre, a surprisingly heavy
yield for that district.
Other crops in that locality will
yield about tho same quality and
quantity of wheat and tho farmers In
that dry district aro highly olated
over the extraordinary crop.
Tho average crop in the country
west of this city and north of Yoakum
is from IS to 20 bushels, and pros
pects of getting from 25 to 30 hush
els hnd given nn Impetus to real es
tate there.
John Crow's barley crop on tho res
ervation Is also being threshed and
Is yielding about 35 bushels per acre.
His wheat was slightly damnged by
the rains, but will yield well.
ONE FARE TICKETS
RAILROADS HELP SWELL
MASS MEETING IN PORTLAND.
SOLDIER BOYS WEST.
Last
the
Idaho Companies Pass Through
Evening to Portland to Join
Advance to Summer Camp.
Tho Idaho militia companies, in two
trains consisting of 15 cars, passed
down tho O. It. &NN. last evening to
Portland, where they will Join tho Or
egon companies and proceeded today,
in five special trains, to American
Lake, Idaho, where tho summer out
ing will be enjoyed.
Tho first train was in charge of
Conductor Wieden, with engine 310,
and the second In chargo of Conduc
tor Stull, with engino 304. Thero
were about 800 men in the two train
loads, which included about 20 men
.from Baker City and La, Grande.
Packers Meet in Portland.
Charles F. Martin, secretary of tho
National Livestock Association, pass
ed through the city today en route to
Portland, where ho will meet with a
committee from tho Independent
Packing Company, with regard to es
tabllshlng the first plant in Portland.
Vote for King of the Carnival.
I vote for
to bo king of tho Eagles' Car-
nival, Pendleton, July 11-16.
This coupon is good for five
votes and must be voted at
this office not later than G p.
m., July 14. All candidates for
king must bo members of tho
local aerie of Eagles.
A Bank
Account Drawing
Interest
WE RECEIVE DEP08IT8 FOR ANY BUM FROM ONE DOL
LAR UPWARDS. A PA88-BOOK WILL BE GIVEN YOU WHEN
YOU MAKE THE FIRST DEP08IT. YOU THEN HAVE A BANK
ACCOUNT WHICH DRAWS INTEREST. YOU CAN ADD TO
THI8 ACCOUNT AT YOUR PLEASURE.
Commercial National Bank
OF PENDLETON
Oregon Towns Invited to Send Dele'
gates to Portland on August 2 to
Organize the Oregon Development
League Mayors of Towns and VII
lages and All Industrial Organlza
tlons May Appoint Delegates No
Restrictions on Tickets for the Oc
caslon.
Recognizing tho vital importanco
to Portland, and to the state of Ore
Ron. of havlnc a representative dele'
Ration from every corner of tho stnto
at tho mass meeting In Portland, on
August 2, for the organization of tho
Oregon Development League, tno rail'
roads liavo mnde n one fare round trip
rate from all points in tho state, for
that occasion.
This remarkably low faro will In
duco dolecntes from every isolated
noliit to mnko tho trip nnd bo pros
ont at the organization. It Is tho aim
of the Portland Commercial Club to
have a representative from every
town in the state at this meeting. No
pains will bo spared to securo tho
appointment of delegates, if not by
mayors nnd regular industrial organ
Izatlon. then, by tho citizens them
selves, in mass meetings.
No noliit Is so small as to bo ex
eluded from this meeting in roruanu,
A state Industrial union is to bo
formed at that time. A combination
of Industrial interests, Including every
branch in tho state will bo consum
mated for tho purpose of directing
Oregon cnpltnl to Oregon resources
nnd for tho nunioso of directing Ore
gon products to tho nearest and host
markets, so that no industry m uio
state may suffer from congestion nor
overproduction.
The commercial organizntlons now
oxistlng In tho cities of tho state aro
all strictly local. Tills Oregon devel
opment League Is to bo general and
embrace all tho different portions of
Mm stnto nnd every interest in tho
state In Its organization.
This movement is being promoted
by Tom Itlchardson. manager of the
Portland Commercial Club, under
whose nusplces tho meeting on Aug
ust 2 will he held. Every town and
city In every county is urged to send
delegates. .Mayors may appoint dole
gates, farmers' clubs, Irrigation, horti
cultural, livestock, mining, agricultu
ral, manufacturing, fishing, dairying
or other associations may also send
delegates and are all entitled to rep
resentation, Portland Invites the peoplo of Ore
con to meet In that city on August 2,
and form this league, for mutual pro
tection and mutual development.
There Is no restriction on tne num
ber or occupation of those buying tho
ono fare tickets. The field Is open to
Oregon. All roads leading to Port
land have granteVl a one fare round
trip rate, without certificates, good
for all trains arriving in Portland on
tho afternoon of August 1 and tno
morning of August 2. Oregon will do
the rest.
TWO MILLION POUNDS.
Furnish Warehouse Handles That
Amount of Wool.
It Is estimated by Manager W. F.
Taylor that by tho close of tho sea
son about 2,000,000 pounds of wool
will have betfn handled at the Furn
ish warchouso. Tho remainder of tho
month will ho occupied in baling nnd
then grain will bo handled. Grain
will be coming in and some will bo
handled prior to that time, but tho
big grain business will not come on
until about August 1.
It has been commonly believed that
considerable wool was damaged by
the recent storm. It develops that
the damage was not nearly so largo
as thought at first; certainly not at
tho Furnish warehouse.
"About 50 sacks were exposed to
the rain on tho south sido of tho
house," said Mr. Taylor. "Wo had to
cut open about 40 sacks and placo the
wool out to dry. These were under
tho drip and wero wetted tho worst.
The damago amounts practically to
tho extent of tho exponso of handl
ing tho wet wool.
"I hardly think any of tho wool will
have to be scoured, as It is drying out
In a satisfactory manner. Of course,
it will bo graded after tho drying pro
cess Is completed."
also had a dozen men hang nroitnd
the O. It. & N. depot, waiting to help
unload n harvester which ho claimed
was to arrho from the East. Clar
enco told Judge Fltz Gerald ho was
only Joking. His honor thought It
would ho n good plan to got In on tho
ground floor nnd participate.
Ono of tho men complnlnlng to
Marshal Carney about Bell said the
prisoner hnd -hired his mothor to do
tho cooking for tho harvest hands ho
had promised employment. Tho au
thorities arc of the opinion Hint Dell
Is demented, as ho had not been
drinking when placed under arrest
WOOLGROWERS INTERESTED.
Delegates From Oregon Association
Will Probably Be Appointed to the
Portland Meeting.
J. H. Owinn, secretary of tho Oro
gon Woolgrowors' Association, In
speaking of tho appointment of dele
gates from the association to tho
mass meeting to be held In Portland
on August 2 for tho purpose of or
ganizing tho Oregon Development
League, said tho woolgrowors wero
deeply interested and would In nil
probability appoint delegates.
Tho Bheopgrowlng Industry Is one
of tho lending enterprises in tho stnto
nnd thoso Interested In It nro very
anxious to advance every branch of
Industry In the state nnd would co
oporato with other Industries in bring
ing capital and tho opportunity to
gether, nnd nlso desire to Bee the
widest development of nil the resour
ces. Mr. Owinn will pcrhnps attend tho
meeting nnd tho rcgulnr dclegntcs
will bo announced Inter, nftor ho enn
confer with President Douglas Holts,
who is now on his Hirch creek ranch.
Man Wanted at La Grande.
City Mnrshnl Cnrnoy received n tel
ephone messngo thlo morning from
La Grande to be at tho depot when
train No. 1 passed through, and see if
a mnn wanted for obtaining nionoy by
laiso pretenses wns aboard. HIh
nnmo Is not known to tho La Ornndo
authorities, but a good description
was furnished. Tho marshal was on
hand, but wns unablo to catch sight of
any person answering the descrip
tion.
Returning From Europe.
Miss Grace G. Isaacs, of Walla
Walla, a friend of Miss Ida Boyd, and
a sister of J. P. and E. S. Isaacs, well
known Walla Walla citizens, returned
tins morning from an extended trip
through Europe. Sho also visited tho
St. Louis fnlr. and other points of in
terest in tho East and South. She
has been absent from Walla Walla
for soveral months and returns great'
ly delighted with her visit to Europe.
Fish Did Not Bite Well.
Postmaster I.ivermoro and his two
sons, Robert and Lynwood, who went
on n fishing excursion in tho vicinity
of Cayuse, returned last night. The
day was warm and the fish did not
bite well, but the sportsmen do not
regret the trip, as thoy saw tho res'
ervation Indians engaging tn a war
dance. About a dozen bucks partlcl
pated In tho dance.
Large New Barn.
H. E. Cook is building a largo
barn for H. W. McCormmach on tho
lattcr's ranch, near Fulton. Tho
structure Is n frame, 50x90 feet, two
full stories with basement. It will
cost nearly $4000.
Bids Wanted.
Bids wanted for excavating for the
now Schmidt building on Main street.
Bids will bo opened Tuesday noon,
July 12. Call at John Schmidt's at
Louvre saloon for particulars.
Waugh House ,Sold.
E. T. "Wado-fc Son yesterday sold
tho Alexander Wangh property, on
Thompson street, occupied by J. H.
Dunham, to ,11. Lalng, for $2200.
CEMENT DIPPING VAT.
Plant, Including Engine, Cost Eight
Hundred Fifty Dollars.
Ono of the best cement vats for dip
ping mangy cattle In tho state, has
been constructed on tho 'Butter crook
farm of Asa B. Thomson at Echo. He
sent to Portland for a two-horso
boiler, which was installed today and
everything will bo in readiness for
putting" the cattle through the dipping
process tomorrow. Tho vat and ac;
cessorles cost 9850.
Tho vat Is tho property of Thomson,'
It. B. Stanflold and J. B, Baylor. Six
or seven hundred head of cattle own
ed by them will bo dipped first, re
quiring about two days' tlmo, and
thon rango cattlo to tho number of
two or throo thousand will take tholr
turn in .the big tub. As soon as the
cattlo owned by tho three men inter
ested in tho dipping process aro put
through thoy will bo shipped to the
Omaha market.
CRUEL JOKE.
Perpetrator Gets Five Days for "Fool
ing" Men Who Want Work,
For perpetrating a Joko on a num.
her of harvest hands, Claronco Bell
wns hauled boforu Pollco Judge Fltz
Gerald yesterday aftornoon and givon
five days in the city Jail. Ho ongaged
about 30 of them to work for him on'
an Imaginary farm near tho city, and
had them watting to begin work. Ho
Amorlcan trade with South America
litis Increased hut 5 per cent in 30
years. Consular reports attribute
this condition to lack of banks and
shipping facilities, and Inefficient
agents.
tfrink
REAM
m
St Is Fine
IN 1 and 2 LB.
SEALED TINS ONLY
Havo you a "boomerang"? Great
sport for tho boys; 25, 35 and 50c
each,
Frederick Nolf &Co.
Bird cages, enameled and brass, 16
different styles, 73c to $1.65.
Almost 200 patterns fancy cups and
saucers, 10c to $1.45 each.
Curtain stretchers, two styles, $1.65
and $2.95. Made of bard wood and
moving pins.
J. L. VAUGHN
Electrician
Prompt attention given and all
J work executed properly.
Bleetrieal Supplies of all kinds
OFFICE-121 WEST COURT ST.
(Tribune Balldlnf)
Removal
Prices
1 dozen tin top half-pint JeW
Glasses tor Sdc
15 lbs. Sugar for $1, to J
the jelly with.
Owl Tea House
REMEMBER
THIS IS THE TIME OF YEAR WHEN WE ARE
MORE THAN
GENEROUS
THE END OF THE SPRING SEASON AND MID-SUMMI
FINDS US WITH A NUMBER OF BARGAINS ON HAN
THE8E WILL BE MADE EVEN MORE ATTRACTIVE BY Fllj
THER PRICE REDUCTIONS. YOU WILL FIND THEM
EVERY DEPARTMENT. j
The Boston Stori
Shoes and Clothing
GREAT
SAVING
Men's and Boys' Clothing at
Slashed Prices
J $12.50 Men's Suits m
$15.00 Men's Suit
$17.50 Men's Suits ' $1
$20.00 Men's Suits
rpM. Mnftnn nnnllfiH to till Other prfC"1 tW
BOYS' CLOTHING
We will give a special discount upon oil boys' clotbh
Straw Hats at
Half Price
I BAER. Sb DALEY
HHkiiiSMisXAiii