East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, May 20, 1904, DAILY EVENING EDITION, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3

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rEN PACES-
II
MOUNTAINS
LT PEAK IN UNiTED
STATES IS MT. WHimtr.
.nIa climbers Take the Altitude
Mountain, Which Is 14,522
Above the Sea-Mt. Shasta
)nd Highest. 14,446 Feet and
. . j aa aaa P-t Carne-
f ,er THira,
WIH Build Observatory on Mt.
n
L are many very lofty snow
1 on the Facinc i""
m.t.l ".. ),n mentioned Mts.
fersw.tr Hood. Rainier, Ba
PCJ . ttir,c Inffnrson and
am8' 'XvA VnPV. located In
r?' u" , miehtv Sierra Ne-
BOiintalnB. In Kern county. Cal
mo . .no rtlst net on ot be-
Re highest snow peak in the
Id States,
L. ,eCcntly the exact aitmmc oi
Fvt mountain was ascertained
I " .,..iis fBtitlpraen nrofes-
McAdle and Joseph LeCon e.
I of the University m v,a......
f ' j .ooHmpnts were made.
ihe exact altitude of this mignty
Ltaln accurately oeifruiu.uu-ii,
feet above tide water.
V ... l.nn.tnnt
lis fact semes oc
that Mount wimncy js mo
I peak In the unuen oiuius.. u
e Mount St. Ellas and Mount
.v..ntpil. these two be-
located far In the north, and
Iteir to be considered as proper
c United States. The next high
Cv. io Mnnnt Shasta, located in
northern part of California. . be-
B4.460 feet ine imru in wuiuuo
tho state of
hinston 14,444 feet above the
llerel.
lily of recent years has Mount
finer been ascended. The ascent
(descent are attendee: wltn mucn
hardship and peril, liecenny
peak was ascended by the fam
eurra rhili" of Mountain cllmb-
lof San Francisco, California.
he round trip, which consumea
ni wpoks. vb8 made without any
dent. Among the large party
fe a number of ladles, ana acspue
ions and terrible climb, they
id the trip very wen.
He photographs taken show Mc-
U anrl T.fVintn lust in the act of
Iputlng the altitude of this grand
fct snow peak. After completing
measurement of the peak's height
r Hung to the irozen air "uio,
rr" In hnnnr nf HlR flirt that the
flse height of the vast mountnln
heen determined: and that the
Im that Mount Whitney is the lof
It peak in the United States had
PA-QE THREE.
uinm nr thf irrigation m 1
DAILY EAST OREGONIAN, PENDLETON, OREGON, FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1804.
been vindicated. It was tho first
time that the Stars and Stripes were
unfurled from tho highest point in
North America.
. Very recently a letter was "receiv
ed in San Francisco from Mr. George
E. Hale of Chicago, secretary ot the
commission of observatories, stating
that a Carnegie observatory will soon
be built on the crest of Mount Whit
ney. This building is to be 103 feet long
and 30 feet wide, with a porch ex
tending around It It will be con
structed of granite, and all of the
equipments are to be of the latest
and most modern type. Such an ob
servatory will be of great service
and importance to scientific experi
ments. From tho summit of Mount Whit
ney tho view Is one of incomparable
grandeur and beauty, and the glories
revealed by tho vast panorama will
live In memory during n lifetime.
Pacific Monthly for May.
Oliti
"Miss Screecher comes from a mus
ical family."
"Is that so?"
"Yes. Her father is a drummer
and her brother Is a tutor."
Secretary Hitchcock has set aside
from tho irrigation fund tho sum of
$1,000,000 to begin building the Path
finder dam in Central Wyoming. The
dam at the Junction of the Yellowstone
and Sweetwater rivers Is the first to
be begun under the new arrangement
for Irrigation by the United States
government a system which will
work astounding changes in tho as
pect and wealth of the country.
The new dam will furnish water
enough to irrigate 250,000 acres of
land at a cost of $10 per acre. As Ir
rigated land is suitable for concen
trated farming, this area will support
125,000 persons, though not nearly so
many will at first find homes upon it.
This single fertile belt along a single
stream will therefore support moro
people than there are today in all
Wyoming.
t irrigation means closely set com
jmunities. These mean again thnt
J farm life will not bo lonely: that good
schools and churches and splendid
roads can be made by the settlers, en
hancing the comforts of rural life.
Fruits and vegetables will abound on
irrigated land. The desert will blos
som as the rose. Irrigated land in
one place will be Hised under the law
to begin other projects, so that tho
construction of irrigating works will
Increase at n constantly accelerating
pace.
There are half a billion acres of
public lands remaining unclaimed, ex
clusive of Alaska. Very much of this
domain Is uttlizable through Irrigation.
Besides, there are vast areas of prl
vnte land available for agriculture of
higher productiveness through water
supply by the government. With" Ir
rigation there Is almost no limit to the
capacity of the United States to feed
Its own people and spare grain for the
world. Two hundred millions can live
In the Missouri Purchase alone.
The next great problem Is to get tho
people on the land as Commander
Booth-Tucker, of the Salvation Array
put It, to fit the landless man to the
manless land.
The late Mark Hanna was greatly
Aunt Sally (from the west) Wal
do, would you like to take a ride on
the choo choo cars with me?
Waldo Brownbeans (of Boston)
Why, certainly, my dear aunt. If there
be such a method of locomotion.
Doubtless it would be extremely in
teresting. I had hitherto presumed
that the old methods of steam con
veyance were still in vogue. Chicago
News.
Interested In n bill advocated by Mr.
Booth-Tucker to establish a depart
ment of, colonization, and provide an
initial fund of $50,000,000 to advance
to actual settlers upon Irrigated land.
Tho experience of tho Salvntton Army
In Colorado seems to show that poor
men who have conclusively failed to
make In the cities a decent living for
their fnmllles have succeeded in gain
ing independence upon tho farm col
onies of Colorndo. What these cati do
others can do.
Paternal government with a ven
geance for the United States to es
tablish settlers In tho West? Per
haps, but not moro paternal than tho
homestead act. Mr. Booth-Tucker
points out thnt the government would
risk nothing In advancing money to
settlers, as the partial payment they
would mnko In return would not only
replace the principal but repay Inter-
'est nt the rate ot 6 per cent. Thus
ithls fund, like the Irrigation money,
would constantly Increaso and con
stantly, as repaid, bo available In part
,'for use In now localities.
I Another phase of irrigation Is of
i tremendous importance to the lower
I Mississippi valley its effect upon
floods.
The Pathfinder dam alone will Im
pound the flood waters of 400 miles of
the Yellowstone and 300 miles of tho
Sweetwnter river, with their tributary
mountnln streams. The silt will not
get n chance to roll down Into the
Mississippi valley nnd raise the river
bottom. Tho water will be restrained
from joining the great June floods.
Other reservoirs upon other head
waters will havo tho same effect.
Whnt might happen in tho Missis
sippi valley If the levee policy were
to contlnde indefinitely without aid
from reservoirs Is shown by the de
structive Hoods of the Honngho In
China, whose broken levee less than
20 years ago devastaded whole prov
inces and actually drowned 7,000,000
people.
The Hoangho is a river in the air;
tho Mississippi Is becoming one. Head-
I water reservoirs alo'no can restrain It.
New York World.
Spain Reduces Wheat Duty.
The duty on wheat has been re
duced from S pesetas to 6 pesetas per
100 kilograms ($1,544 to $1,158 per 220
pounds), and on wheat flour from
13.20 pesetas to 10 pesetas per 100
kilograms ($2.55 to $1.93 per 220
pounds). The above reduction is to
remain In force as long as the price of
wheat exceeds 27 pesetas per 100 kilo
grams ($5.31 per 220 pounds) in the
markets of Castile, taking for the quo
tations the markets of Valladolid, Sal
amanca, Zamora and Burgos. R. M.
Bartleman, consul, Cadiz. Spain,
March 19, 1904.
When the Sap Rises
Weak lungs should bo careful. Coughs
nnd colds are dangerous then. One
Minute Cough Cure cures coughs and
colds and gives strength to tho
lungs. Mrs. G. E. Fenner of Marlon,
Ind.. says: "I suffered with a cough
until I run down In weight from 148
to 92 pounds. I tried n number of
remedies to no avail until I used One
Mlnuto Cough Cure. Four bottles of
thl wonderful remedy cured mo en
tirely of the cough, strengthened my
lungs and restored me to my normal
weight, health and strength." Sold
by Tallman & Co.
Closing-Out Sale
Trotting-Bred
Horses
HAVING DECIDED TO DEVOTE MY ATTENTION TO
MINING, I WILL ON SATURDAY, JUNE 4, AT THE OREGON
FEED YARD, PENDLETON, ORE., OFFER FOR 8ALE AT
PUBLIC AUCTION, THE FOLLOWING HOR3E8. TERMS
cash. c. L. COX.
BELLE SPOTSWOOD Bay mare (14) weight 1200, with -est Al
ton B colt yet foaled In Umntllla county, by side, by Alblcore,
Hoc. 2:27i4 trotting, by Alwood, by Almont 3.1. Dam by Holle
founder. Dam Hello Morgan, n high-classed mare ot Huniblcl nlnn and
Morgan breeding.
LITTLE MARGARET Bay mnro (11) weight 1100, with a flno
Wostfleld colt by sldo, by Alblcoro; dam, Mng by Tanillalno, n
I.unnnux horso; 2d dniu, a Morgnn mare.
' FITZ LEE Bay gelding (0) weight 1250, by Wostfleld.
Dam, Hello Spotswood; 2d dam Belle Morgan.
BAY GELDING (3) Full brother to Fltz I.co.
BAY GELDING (3) AND BAY FILLY (2) By Wostfleld.
Dam, Little Margaret.
BAY FILLY (3) AND BAY COLT (2) ny Hassaloo, by Woatflold;
dam, Alta, by AUemonL
Dam, Belle Wostfleld, by Westflold; 2d dnm Bollo Spots wood; 3d
dam, Bollo Morgnn.
BAY COLT (1) By Caution, by Electioneer.
Dam, Bollo Wostfleld, by Wostlluld; 2d dam Bollo Spotswood, by Al
blcore, by Almont 33; dnm by Bcllfooundor; 3d dam Hello Morgan.
LEGAL BLANKS Xtli
alogoe of them. A fall supply always kept In stock.
linn:
miiiiiiiixiiiiinxxxim
THE REMOVAL SALE
At the Owl Tea House starts Saturday morning at 9 o'clock
i
-t
Ilk
I u in
s, ;
... 1 1
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' AFTER HAVING CLOSED OUR STORE FOR THREE DAYS TO MARK DOWN GOOD", OdR
DOORS WILL BE THROWN OFEN TO THE PUBLIC SATURDAY MORNING,
GLASSWARE, CHINAWARE, CUT GLASS, CROCKERY AND NOTIONS ALL GO AT THI8
SALE. '
WE HAVE GOT TO MOVE AND WANT YOU TO COME AND HELP US BY TAKING THE
GOODS TO YOUR HOME AT UNHEARD OF LOW PRICES.
EVERY ARTICLE IN OUR STORE MU8T BE SOLD WITHOUT DELAY, NOTHING RESERV
ED. YOU WILL PROFIT BY THE P08ITION WE ARE IN.
WE HAVE SLAUGHTERED THE PRICE ALL THE WAY DOWN THE LINE ON OUR
LARGE AND WELL-KEPT STOCK, SO THAT YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO LET OPPORTUNITY GO
BY.
COME-IN EARLY AND LEARN WHAT A GREAT SAVING YOU CAN MAKE AT THI8
SALE. OUR L088 IS YOUR GAIN. WE HAVE GOT TOJ VACATE THE 'ROOM AND.A8 OUR LINE
OF -GOODS 18 PARTICULARLY SUBJECT TO MUCH DAMAGE IN BEING MOVED, THEREFORE
WE tWlLL iMAKE IT A BIG OBJECT Tp. YpP.TO'BUY.
ALL GOODS ARE MARKED IN PLAIN FIGURES, 80 YOU CAN SELECT WHAT YOU
WANT AND 8EE WHAT 'IT W60LD COST YOU..,,FIR8T COME FIR6T SERVED,
'
f
! 1
)
I " I
K I P
The
Court Street
OWL TEA HOUSE
Great Sacrifice Sale starts Saturday morning at 9 o'clock
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xxxxi
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