The skanner. (Portland, Or.) 1975-2014, October 17, 2018, Page Page 2, Image 2

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    Page 2 The Skanner Portland & Seattle October 17, 2018
®
Challenging People to Shape
a Better Future Now
Bernie Foster
Founder/Publisher
Opinion
The Skanner News Endorsements for Nov. 2018 Elections
Bobbie Dore Foster
Executive Editor
U.S. REPRESENTATIVE, 3RD DISTRICT:
Earl Blumenauer
Jerry Foster
Advertising Manager
Christen McCurdy
News Editor
Patricia Irvin
Graphic Designer
Monica J. Foster
Seattle Office Coordinator
Earl Blumenauer is a proven leader and
advocate for the state of Oregon. Most Or-
egonians know him as the high-profile en-
vironmental Congress member. But he is
always at the forefront no matter which
issue is raised — voting rights, gun safety,
Earl Blumenauer health care, jobs, VA reform, social securi-
ty, he makes the strong case for the people
of this state. He is the most experienced, and best qualified to
continue representing Oregon in Washington, D.C.
GOVERNOR OF OREGON: Kate Brown
Susan Fried
Photographer
2017
MERIT
AWARD
WINNER
The Skanner Newspaper, es-
tablished in October 1975, is a
weekly publication, published
every Wednesday by IMM Publi-
cations Inc.
415 N. Killingsworth St.
P.O. Box 5455
Portland, OR 97228
Telephone (503) 285-5555
Fax: (503) 285-2900
info@theskanner.com
www.TheSkanner.com
The Skanner is a member of the
National Newspaper Pub lishers
Association and West Coast Black
Pub lishers Association.
All photos submitted become
the property of The Skanner. We
are not re spon sible for lost or
damaged photos either solicited
or unsolicited.
Kate Brown, the consistent, steady, strong
governor of this state has a reputation for
taking on tough issues, and fighting for the
people in an ethical and determined man-
ner. She is not a show-off, or grandstander,
she doesn’t need to shout to make a point,
but she gets the job done in her own deci-
sive way.
Kate Brown
While she represents everyone in the
state, rural and urban, she is known in communities of color as
a person who hears their concerns and takes action. In North
and Northeast Portland she is highly regarded as a champion
of health care for children and families, a strong supporter
of education, and making sure there are highly qualified ed-
ucators and programs for students. She has advocated for
making college affordable, especially for low-income students
through the expansion of the Oregon Opportunity Grants.
Governor Brown has worked to continue federal funding for
mental health and health-related disabilities, protection for
immigrant families, building affordable homes throughout the
state. She has also focused on housing for the homeless popula-
tion. And she is a proponent of sensible gun control.
Kate Brown is the proven leader who gets things done, she
and has a plan to do much more for the citizens of this state.
Her opponent, Knute Beuhler, wants to be all things to all peo-
ple, but has been held up to scrutiny and comes up inconsis-
tent. However, he is consistent in his opposition to sensible
gun control legislation, and to women’s reproductive health-
care rights. Not to mention immigrants’ rights, and a long list
of other issues we should be concerned about. He is not the per-
son we want to lead this state. We need a governor who stands
up for all people. Kate Brown is that person.
MULTNOMAH COUNTY AUDITOR: Scott Learn
A former Price Waterhouse accountant,
Scott Learn has a forensic knowledge of
budgets and has been called “the most high-
ly qualified person,” to run for Multnomah
County auditor. We agree and we endorse
Scott Learn.
©2018 The Skanner. All rights re served. Reproduction in
whole or in part without permission prohibited.
Scott Learn
Local News
Pacific NW News
World News
Opinions
Jobs, Bids
Entertainment
Community Calendar
PORTLAND CITY COUNCIL, POSITION 3:
Jo Ann Hardesty
Updated daily.
FAIRVIEW CITY COUNCIL, POSITION 5: Natalie Voruz
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LOCAL NEWS
BRIEFS
We endorsed former legislator, former
NAACP Portland Branch president Jo Ann
Hardesty this spring, and see no reason to
change our position. A former state repre-
sentative, she brings legislative experience
to the city council, as well as a lifelong com-
Jo Ann Hardesty mitment to equity and justice. Over the last
15 years she has shown herself to be a tire-
less grassroots community organizer and advocate.
Working on the Department of Justice settlement with the
City of Portland Police department, Hardesty used the courts to
push for police accountability. She also is almost single-hand-
edly responsible for bringing the NAACP back as a force in
Portland. Jo Ann is the right woman for the job. She will hold
her own on city council, work well with other commissioners
and insist on fairness, accountability, and good government.
OREGON STATE MEASURES:
MEASURE 102
YES
Amends Constitution to allow local bonds for financ-
ing affordable housing with nongovernmental enti-
ties. Vote Yes.
MEASURE 103
YES
This measure would amend the Oregon constitution
to proactively prevent a tax on groceries. Everybody
needs to buy groceries, and taxing them is regressive.
We endorse a “yes” vote.
MEASURE 104
NO
Amends the state constitution to expand current re-
quirements for legislative bills that increase revenue.
If passed, fees and changes to tax exemptions, deduc-
tions and credits – not just tax levies or increases –
would require a three-fifths majority. The current law
states that bills for raising revenue, which require a
three-fifths majority, are limited to bills that levy or
increase taxes. Vote No.
MEASURE 105
NO
Would repeal Oregon’s sanctuary state law. Vote No.
MEASURE 106
NO
Amends the constitution to prevent spending “pub-
lic funds” for abortion and to reduce abortion access.
Vote No.
CITY OF PORTLAND MEASURES
MEASURE 26-200
YES
Measure 26-200 would limit candidate contributions
and expenditures and require campaign communi-
cations to identify funders of city-level campaigns.
Politics, at the local and national level, is increasing-
ly a sport closed to those without enormous financial
resources. This measure would provide a necessary
corrective to that trend – while also requiring greater
transparency from candidates and funders. Vote Yes.
MEASURE 26-201
YES
This measure would charge a 1 percent surcharge
on revenues from large retailers to fund renewable
energy, with a focus on providing jobs training for
communities of color, women, people with disabili-
ties and those who have been chronically underem-
ployed. This measure was the result of a rare grass-
roots decision-making process where communities of
color led the way rather than being tokenized, and the
result is a win-win: a measure that helps Portlanders
shift away from a fossil-fuel economy while ensuring
people of color will benefit from the green economy.
Vote Yes.
MEASURE 26-199
YES
This measure would create a bond to fund affordable
housing in Washington, Clackamas and Multnomah
Counties. The housing crisis is now a statewide prob-
lem, with the Portland metro area being particularly
hard-hit and with rents increasing in nearly every
part of the region. Black families throughout the met-
ro area have been hit particularly hard by this crisis,
first facing gentrification and displacement, now fac-
ing spiraling rents in the suburbs and outer rings of
the city, along with stagnant wages and longer com-
mutes. It’s time to act to stanch the bleeding and get
more of our neighbors into stable housing. Vote Yes.
LAKE OSWEGO CITY COUNCIL: Massene Mboup
Massene Mboup, an educator and entrepreneur originally
from Senegal, is committed to making Lake Oswego a more af-
fordable and equitable place for all residents. We hope voters
give him the chance to do great things.
Incumbent Natalie Voruz has served on the Fairview City
Council since 2015. In that time, she’s demonstrated leadership
around transparency – calling for an audit of a stubborn col-
league’s emails – and a commitment to addressing the growing
community’s challenges head-on.
Christine Lewis has strong bipartisan support, and her fo-
cus on increasing available affordable housing and improving
infrastructure make her a formidable candidate for this often
overlooked but crucial seat.
GRESHAM CITY COUNCIL, POSITION 6: Janine M. Gladfelter
TROUTDALE CITY COUNCIL, POSITION 3: Jamie Kranz
Janine Gladfelter was appointed to fill a vacant seat on the
Gresham City Council in early 2017 and has risen to the oc-
casion. She seems ready to meet the challenges presented by
a community that is growing quickly and rapidly becoming
more diverse.
METRO COUNCIL, DISTRICT 2: Christine Lewis
Jamie Kranz’s diversity of experience – as a stay at home
mom, a teacher and someone who’s worked in the retail and
hospitality sectors — will bring a refreshing perspective to
Troutdale’s city council.
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