The skanner. (Portland, Or.) 1975-2014, January 17, 2018, Image 1

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    JANUARY 17, 2018
Portland and Seattle Volume XL No. 16
25
CENTS
News ..................................3,10 A & E .................................... 8-9
Opinion ...................................2 MLK Breakfast Photos .6-7
Calendars ........................... 4-5 Bids/Classifieds ....................11
CHALLENGING PEOPLE TO SHAPE A BETTER FUTURE NOW
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE STATE OF OREGON
MLK BREAKFAST
Justice Adrienne Nelson
Adrienne Nelson, the
first Black Supreme
Court Justice, talks
about her record and
new role
By Christen McCurdy
Of The Skanner News
O
regon’s first Black Supreme
Court Justice went to work last
week.
Adrienne Nelson is the African
American to serve on the Oregon Su-
preme Court. She was appointed to the
position by Gov. Kate Brown on Jan. 2
to fill a vacancy left by retiring justice
Jack L. Landau.
Prior to this appointment, Nelson
served as a Multnomah County Circuit
Court judge starting in 2006. Before
that, she worked at Portland State Uni-
versity as a senior attorney and coordi-
nator of student legal and medication
services, and in private practice for
the Portland firm Bennett, Hartman,
Morris and Kaplan, LLP, from 1999 to
2004. She began her legal career as
a public defender at Multnomah De-
fenders, Inc., and served from 1996 to
1999. Judge Nelson grew up in Arkan-
sas, and earned her undergraduate de-
gree from the University of Arkansas
and her law degree from the Universi-
ty of Texas.
See NELSON on page 3
Cheryl Grace addressed an audience of about 1,000 people at the Red Lion Hotel on the River on Hayden Island for The Skanner Foundation’s 32nd Annual
Martin Luther King Jr. Day Breakfast. Twenty-two Oregon students received scholarships at the event.
‘Use Your Power,’ Grace Tells Breakfast Attendees
At MLK Breakfast, Nielsen VP urged audience to move past fear
By Christen McCurdy
Of The Skanner News
T
wenty-two
Oregon
students
received
scholarships Monday
morning at The Skan-
ner Foundation’s 32nd
Annual Martin Luther
King Jr. Day Breakfast —
the highest number in the
foundation’s history.
About 1,000 people gath-
ered Monday at the as-
sembled crowd of 1,000 at
the Red Lion Hotel on the
River on Hayden Island for
the breakfast, which was
keynoted by Cheryl Grace,
the senior vice president
of U.S. strategic communi-
ty alliances and consumer
engagement at Nielsen.
Mayor Ted Wheeler, Gov.
Kate Brown and Daisy
Santos, corporate trainer
at Northwest Natural all
shared brief remarks at the
beginning of the event, as
did representatives from
several sponsoring organi-
zations.
“I cannot recall a time
in our history more ur-
gent than right now. Our
nation is at a crossroads,”
Wheeler said. “Now more
than ever, we must take Dr.
King’s words to heart.”
Grace started her key-
note address with a
five-question survey about
Black culture. After asking
the audience to fill in the
blanks on the aphorism
“Black don’t crack” and
asking where Black people
go for therapy (church),
Grace remarked her adult
son knew the answer to
every single one of the
questions on the list, even
though she didn’t recall ex-
plicitly teaching him any of
them.
“Black culture is bigger
than all of us,” Grace said.
“Being Black is kind of
cool.”
At Nielsen Grace has
spearheaded several years
of research on Black con-
sumers and their influence
on consumers of other rac-
es. At the same time Afri-
can Americans are regard-
ed as tastemakers, Grace
said, conversations about
the Black experience are
increasingly about some-
thing else: fear.
“Lately when any con-
versation about African
Americans is had, it’s
about fear. It’s about what
we are afraid of or who is
afraid,” she said.
She went on to recite a
quote from King: “People
don’t get along because
they fear each other. Peo-
ple fear each other because
they don’t know each other.
They don’t know each oth-
er because they don’t com-
municate.”
Grace shared a personal
See BREAKFAST on page 3
Minority Business Owners Talk Capital at Feb. 2 Event
Public event on securing funds for minority and
women entrepreneurs
page 9
Leaders React to Trump’s
‘Sh–hole Countries’
Remarks
page 10
By Melanie Sevcenko
Of The Skanner News
A
sk any small business owner
and they’ll likely tell you se-
curing a loan is no easy feat.
And if the proprietor is a mi-
nority or a woman, the barriers to
capital are often tougher to break.
According to 2015 figures by the
U.S. Small Business Association, mi-
nority-owned businesses make up
30.9 percent of all small businesses
in Oregon.
But while that number is a slight
increase from previous years, the
financial challenges facing these
groups far outpace non-minority en-
trepreneurs.
It’s the reason Ascent Funding
formed back in 2008. Originally
called Albina Opportunities Corpo-
ration and headed by Terry Brandt,
See BUSINESS on page 3
PHOTO COURTESY OF ASCENT FUNDING
NAACP
Image
Awards
PHOTO BY ANTONIO HARRIS
Justice
Nelson
Sworn In
If a proprietor is a woman or person of color, the
barriers to capital are often tougher to break