The skanner. (Portland, Or.) 1975-2014, December 20, 2017, Page Page 5, Image 5

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    December 20, 2017 The Skanner Page 5
News
Events & Announcements
Community
Calendar 2017
cont’d from pg 4
Seattle Metro
MONDAY – SATURDAY, DEC. 18 – 23
30TH ANNUAL ISSAQUAHREINDEER FESTIVAL: Come by the great-
est holiday festival in the Northwest. Enjoy the festive sights
and sounds of the holiday season with family and friends. Come
meet Santa and reindeer team. Free festival, Cougar Mountain
Zoo, 19525 SE 54th St., Issaquah.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23
PHOTO BY SUSAN FRIED
CASCADIAN HOLIDAY POP-UP: A holiday gift pop-up with local
crafts, books and collectables. Free. Noon – 7 p.m., Horizon
Books, 1423 10th Ave.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 30
Seattle Stand Down
Optometrist Dr. Edward L. Jones exams Veteran Jason Newman’s eyes during the 7th Annual Seattle Stand Down held Dec. 14 and 15 at
the Georgetown Campus of South Seattle College. The annual event provides a place where Veterans can access a variety of services
including basic health, dental and optical care, free haircuts, they can get socks, boots, and other apparel and they can also receive
help finding other services available to veterans in the community. Veterans could use free transit to get to the event. More than 440
Veterans were served by 250 volunteers and 50 service providers at this year’s Stand Down.
Briefs cont’d from pg 4
Lowenstein and his inspiring model of public service.
In his will, Steve provided for an annual financial
award for those individuals who make enduring con-
tributions to help the underprivileged in the City of
Portland. Steve’s sense of purpose, integrity and per-
severance was a model for many working on human
rights and social justice. A life-long civil rights advo-
cate, Steve served in the Peace Corps after law school
in the early 1960’s, was a founding director of Oregon
Legal Services and authored The Jews of Oregon –
1850-1950, a groundbreaking history. At the time of
his death in 1990, Steve had served for six years as
Chief of Staff to former Portland City Commissioner
Mike Lindberg.
Seattle News Briefs
Mayor Durkan Announces
Department Leadership
Mayor Jenny A. Durkan announced several offi-
cials last week who will serve in her administration
including department leaders focused on housing,
homelessness, civil rights, transportation, and eco-
nomic opportunity.
Following the resignation of Seattle Department of
Transportation (SDOT) Director Scott Kubly, Mayor
Durkan named Goran Sparrman as Interim Director,
effective January 5, 2018. Sparrman was previously
the Interim Director and Deputy Director of SDOT as
well as the former Director of Transportation at the
City of Bellevue and at Portland’s Bureau of Traffic
Management. Durkan will launch a national search
process to find a candidate for the permanent posi-
tion.
With the resignation of Patricia Lally, the Direc-
tor of the Office for Civil Rights, Mayor Durkan an-
nounced Mariko Lockhart will serve as the Interim
Director of the Office for Civil Rights effective Jan-
uary 3, 2018. Lockhart currently leads the 100,000
Opportunities Initiative – Demonstration Cities for
the Aspen Forum on Community Solutions. She pre-
viously served as the Director of the City of Seattle’s
Youth Violence Prevention Initiative.
Additionally, Mayor Durkan announced several
officials focused on housing, homelessness, and eco-
nomic opportunity who will continue to serve in
their roles including:
• Dwane Chappelle, Director of the Department of
Education and Early Learning
• Fred Podesta, Director of Finance and Administra-
tive Services
• Catherine Lester, Director of the Seattle Human
Services Department
• Rebecca Lovell, Acting Director of the Office of Eco-
nomic Development
• Steve Walker, Director of the Office of Housing
• Cuc Vu, Director of the Office of Immigrant and Ref-
ugee Affairs
Andrew Wyeth Exhibit at SAM to
Close Jan. 15
The Seattle Art Museum’s major exhibition, “An-
drew Wyeth: In Retrospect,” closes Jan. 15. Exploring
groundbreaking perspectives on the art and legacy
of the American painter’s 75-year career, the exhi-
bition brings togeth-
er over 100 paintings
and drawings ranging
from the late 1930s
to 2008, including
Wyeth’s last painting,
“Goodbye” (2008).
Held on the 100th
anniversary of the
artist’s birth, In Ret-
rospect features the
cast of characters from
Wyeth’s world who
feature in his most fa-
mous portraits, such
“Christina Olson” by Andrew Wyeth, as Christina Olson,
Anna and Karl Kuern-
1947
er, and Helga Testorf.
It also explores less-understood influences on Wyeth,
such as film and images of war.
SAM will be open for Christmas Eve, New Year’s
Eve, and New Year’s Day, as well as the final two
Mondays of the exhibition (Jan. 8 and 15). There will
be extended hours until 6 pm each Wednesday, Fri-
day-Sunday, and Monday beginning December 27
through January 12. Finally, special extended hours
until 9 pm will be held for the final three days of the
exhibition. Thursdays are still 10 am–9 pm.
• Dec. 24 (Christmas Eve): 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. (closing
early)
• Dec. 25 (Christmas Day): CLOSED
• Dec. 27: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Dec. 29: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Dec. 30: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Dec. 31 (New Year’s Eve): 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Jan. 1 (New Year’s Day): 10 a.m.–6 p.m
• Jan. 3: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Jan. 5: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Jan. 6: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Jan. 7: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Jan. 8: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Jan. 10: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Jan. 12: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
• Jan. 13: 10 a.m.–9 p.m. (Closing Weekend Hours)
NEW YEAR’S EVE EVENT AT NOON: Bring the kids for play time
New Year’s Eve crafts, face painting, hats, noise makers, a silly
photo booth and more. Free. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Lott’s Wet Science
Center, 500 Adams St. NE, Olympia.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 31
A NEW YEAR’S HIKE AT LEWIS CREEK PARK: Join a park ranger
to reflect on the passage of time in nature. Please dress for the
weather and wear sturdy shoes. Free. 10:30 a.m. – noon, Lewis
Creek Visitor Center, 5808 Lakemont Blvd. SE.
MUSEUM FUN DAYS: NEW YEAR’S EVE: Ring in the New Year by
creating your very own musical shaker. Museum staff will lead
visitors in a dance party to use your new noise maker. 10 a.m. –
6 p.m., Normal admission prices. Children’s Museum, 1501 Pacific
Ave., Tacoma.
• Jan. 14: 10 a.m.–9 p.m. (Closing Weekend Hours)
• Jan. 15 (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day & Closing
Weekend Hours): 10 a.m.–9 p.m.
Mayor Durkan and City
Councilmembers Announces $1
Million to Ensure a Continuation of
Homeless Services
SEATTLE— Following the completion of the RFP
process to focus on longer term housing strategies,
Mayor Jenny A. Durkan, City Councilmembers,
and Seattle Human Services Department (HSD) an-
nounced $1 million available to ensure a continuation
of homeless services for current providers to ensure
no shelters close this winter. With up to six months
of funding for all operating shelters in 2017, the City
is working with agencies to ensure no current shel-
ter programs serving people experiencing homeless-
ness will close in the upcoming months, including
those offering overnight-only programs like those
run by SHARE/WHEEL.
In November, HSD recently awarded $34 million in
homeless investments for 2018 to move more people
into housing, and to address racial disparities among
Black/African American and Native American/Alas-
ka Native communities.  In the funded proposals, pro-
viders outlined their strategies to move more than
7,000 households experiencing homelessness into
permanent housing in 2018. 
For programs that have seen funding changes for
2018, HSD will be allocating resources and transition
funds to ensure providers are eligible for short-term
assistance while adjusting their operations. The de-
partment has assembled $1 million in funding, pri-
marily from savings from projects in other divisions
within HSD, staff savings, and other departmental
administrative savings. There are 33 programs at
12 agencies who are eligible for transition funds to
seamlessly continue operations from 2017 into the
new year and for up to six months of 2018, which in-
cludes investments to DESC to enhance their shelter
program.
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